Home 2011 Summary
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Spacecrafts launched in 2011:
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1) Elektro-L1 / GOMS 2 2) NROL-49 (USA 224) 3) HTV-2 / Kounotori 2 4) Progress M-09M / ISS-41P
5) Geo-IK 2 (Kosmos 2470) 6) NROL-66 / RPP (USA 225) 7) ATV-2 Johannes Kepler 8) STS-133 / ULF-5
9) Glonass-K 1 (Kosmos 2471) 10) Glory 11) E1P / Explorer 1 Prime 12) Hermes
13) KySat 1 14) OTV-2 F1 (USA 226) 15) NROL-27 (USA 227) 16) Soyoz TMA-21 / ISS-26S
17) Beidou 12 (IGSO 3) 18) NROL-34 (USA 228) 19) NROL-34 Sub- satellite (USA 229) 20) Resourcesat 2
21) IMS-1A Youthsat 22) X-SAT 23) Yahsat Y1A 24) Intelsat New Dawn
25) Progress M-10M / ISS-42P 26) Meridian 4 27) SBIRS GEO-1 (USA 230) 23) STS-134 / ULF-6
29) AMS-02 30) Telstar 14R / Estrela do Sul 2 31) GSAT 8 / GrainSat 8 32) ST 2
33) Soyuz TMA-02M / ISS-27S 34) SAC-D / Aquarius 35) Rasad 1 36) Zhongxing 10 / Chinasat 10
37) Progress M-11M / ISS-43P 38) Kosmos 2472 / Korabl-M 39) ORS 1 (USA 231) 40) SJ-11-03 / Shi Jian 11-03
41) STS-135 / ULF-7 42) TL 1-02 / TianLian 1-02 43) Globalstar II-7 44) Globalstar II-8
45) Globalstar II-9 46) Globalstar II-10 47) Globalstar II-11 48) Globalstar II-12
49) GSAT 12 / GrainSat 12 50) SES 3 51) Kazsat 2 52) Navstar 66 (USA 232)
53) Spektr-R / RadioAstron 54) PSSC 2 55) Beidou 13 (IGSO 4) 56) SJ-11-02 /Shi Jiun 11-02
57) Kedr 1 / ARISSat 1 ("RADIOSKAF 2") 58) Juno 59) Astra 1N 60) BSAT 3c / JCSAT 110R
61) Paksat 1R 62) Haiyang 2 63) Edusat 64) NigeriaSat 2
65) NigeriaSat-X / NX 66) Rasat 67) AprizeSat 5 68) AprizeSat 6
69) Sich 2 70) BPA 2 71) Ekspress AM-4 72) SJ-11-04 /Shi Jiun 11-04
73) Progress M-12M / ISS-44P 74) GRAIL-A 75) GRAIL-B 76) Zhongxing 1A / Chinasat 1A
77) Kosmos 2473 / Garpun 78) Arabsat 5C 79) SES 2 80) IGS O-4
81) Atlantic Bird 7 82) Tacsat 4 83) Tiangong 1 84) Quetzsat 1
85) Glonass-M (Kosmos 2474) 86) Intelsat 18 / IS-18 87) Eutelsat W3C 88) Megha-Tropiques
89) Jugnu 90) VesselSat 1 91) SRMSat 92) ViaSat 1
93) Galileo IOV PFM / Thijs 94) Galileo IOV FM2 / Natalia 95) NPP 96) M-Cubed
97) AubieSat 1 98) E1PU2 99) RAX 2 100) DICE 1
101) DICE 2 102) Progress M-13M / ISS-45P 103) Shenzhou VIII 104) Glonass-M (Kosmos 2475)
105) Glonass-M (Kosmos 2476) 106) Glonass-M (Kosmos 2477) 107) Fobos-Grunt 108) Yinghuo 1
109) YW-12 / Yaogan Weixing 12 110) Tianxun 1 111) Soyuz TMA-22 / ISS-28S 112) SW-4 / Shiyan Weixing 4
113) Chuanxin 1-03 114) )AsiaSat 7 115) Curiosity / MSL 116) Glonass-M (Kosmos 2478
117) YW-13 / Yaogan Weixing 13 118) Beidou 14 (IGSO 5) 119) Luch 5A 120) Amos 5
121) IGS Radar-3 122) Pleiades 1 123) Elisa 124) Elisa
125) Elisa 126) Elisa 127) SSOT / Fasat-Charlie 128) Nigcomsat 1R
129) Soyuz TMA-03M / ISS-29S 130) Ziyuan I-02C 131) Meridian (5) 132) Globalstar II-13
133) Globalstar II-14 134) Globalstar II-15 135) Globalstar II-16 136) Globalstar II-17
137) Globalstar II-18
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Elektro-L1 / GOMS 2
Spacecraft: GOMS stands for Geostationary Operational Meteorological Satellite
Chronologies: 2011 payload #1 ; 2011-01A ; 6,984th spacecraft.
Type: Meteorology
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Sponsor: Russia's Roscosmos, Roshydromet and Planeta Agencies
Launch: 20 January 2011 at 12h29 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-45, by a Zenit 3SLBF.
Orbit: Geostationary at 76° East longitude.
Mission: Electro-L1 is a 1,701-kg meteorological satellite. Also known as GOMS 2, it captures real-time images of clouds and storm systems, collecting weather imagery several times per hour with visible and infrared cameras. The satellite also studies space weather phenomena and provide communications for search-and-rescue services. NPO Lavochkin built the spacecraft for a consortium of Russian government institutions led by Roscosmos and two official weather agencies (Roshydromet and Planeta). Elektro-L is the first use of the Lavochkin's new Navigator bus, also to be used for future science satellites. The craft is expected to function for up to ten years. Electro-L1 is Russia's second high-altitude weather observatory, coming after the troubled Elektro 1 launched in 1994 that never achieved all of its goals. The program faced years of delays because of interruptions in funding.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 637 ; Spacewarn No. 687 ; NSSDC 2011-001A ; Spaceflight Now's 20 Jan 11 ; NSSDC 2011-001A
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NROL-49 (USA 224)
Spacecraft: CRYSTAL / KH-11 type ?
Chronologies: 2011 payload #2 ; 2011-02A ; 6,985th spacecraft.
Type: Surveillance
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Sponsor: U.S.'s NRO / National Reconnaissance Office
Launch: 20 January 2011 at 21h10 UT, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-6, by a Delta 4H.
Orbit: 252 km x 1,023 km x 97.9°
Mission: NROL-49 is a National Reconnaissance Office classified satellite. Observations of its orbit are consistent with reports that it is an Improved CRYSTAL type (KH-11 derivative) imaging reconnaissance satellite.  The NRO is a joint Department of Defense-Intelligence Community organization responsible for developing, launching, and operating America’s signals, imagery, and communications satellites. The spacecraft flew in Delta's "heavy" configuration - the highest capacity variant and the most powerful unmanned rocket currently in service in the U.S. This was the first Delta IV Heavy launched from Vandenberg. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 637 ; Spacewarn No. 687 ; NSSDC 2011-002A ; NRO's 20 Jan 11 ; Spaceflight Now's 19 Jan 11, 20 Jan 11, 23 Jan 11 ; NYT 20 Jan 11 ; China Daily's 21 Jan 11 ;
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HTV-2 / Kounotori 2
Spacecraft: HTV stands for H-II Transfer Vehicle.
Kounotori means white stork in Japanese
Chronologies: 2011 payload #3 ; 2011-03A ; 6,986th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
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Sponsor: JAXA / Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
Launch: 22 January 2011 at 5h37 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's Yoshinobu Pad 2 (Y2), by a H-IIB (H-IIB F2).
Orbit: Initial: 200 km x 300 km x 51.6°
At docking: circular at 350 km x 51.6°
Deorbit: 30 March 2011
Mission: HTV 2 is a 10,500-kg cargo ship that delivers supplies and equipment to the International Space Station. It delivers up to six tons of food, clothes, and various experiment devices to ISS, then is reloaded with used devices and clothes to be burned when it reenters the atmosphere. It carried pressurized and unpressurized cargo consisting of scientific gear, spare parts and provisions for the ISS crew. HTV-2 was successfully grappled by the Space station Remote Manipulator System (Canadarm2) on 27 January 2011 at 11h39 UT and berthed to the nadir port of Harmony at ~15h00. This mission is the second time Japan has launched the H-2B rocket and HTV cargo ship. JAXA and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries developed both vehicles as part of their contribution to the space station program. NASA reserves room on HTV missions for U.S. equipment as part of a barter agreement in return for the space shuttle's launch of Japan's Kibo module, the station's largest laboratory.
     On 28 March 2011, HTV-2 was unberthed at 13h43 UT and released from the Canadarm2 at 15h45 UT. On 30 March 200, it was deorbited at 2h44 UT and reentered the atmosphere over the South Pacific at 3h09 UT.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 637, 638 & 640 ; Spacewarn No. 687 ; NSSDC 2011-003A ; Spaceflight Now's 19 Jan 11, 22 Jan 11, 27 Jan 11, 27 Mar 11, 28 Mar 11, 29 Mar 11 ; JAXA 22 Jan 11 & HTV-2 ; ISS On-orbit 27 Jan 11, 28 Mar 11 :
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Progress M-09M / ISS-41P
Spacecraft: Progress M (7K-TGM) No. 409
Chronologies: 2011 payload #4 ; 2011-04A ; 6,987th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
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Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 28 January 2011 at 1h31 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Initial: 193.4 km x 254.6 km x 51.65° x 88.69 min.
At docking: circular at 350 km x 51.6°
Deorbit: 26 April 2011
Mission: Progress M-09M is a resupply craft which carries 2.6 tonnes of cargo, including propellant, oxygen, food, crew parcels, scientific equipment, and additional hardware for the ISS. Among the cargo was was ARISSAT 1 (Kedr) minisatellite. Other payloads on-board are books by Russian space exploration founder Konstantin Tsiolkovsky, and a birthday gift for ISS Commander Scott Kelly. The Progress docked to  Pirs module on 30 January 2011 at 2h39 UT. Progress M-09M will remain docked to the ISS until 26 April 2011, and is expected to undock from the ISS during the STS-134 mission, a first for the ISS program.
     On 22 April 2011, Progress M-09M undocked nominally at 11h41 UT. The cargo ship, loaded with trash, continued to phase away from the station until deorbit burn on 26 April.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 638, 640, 641, 642, 643 ; Spacewarn No. 687 ; NSSDC 2011-004A ; Spaceflight Now's 27 Jan 11 & 29 Jan 11 ; RSC Energia's 28 Jan 11 & 30 Jan 11 ; ISS On-orbit 28 Jan 11, 22 Apr 11 ;
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Geo-IK 2 (Kosmos 2470)
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #5 ; 2011-05A (failure) ; 6,988th spacecraft.
Type: Geogetic
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Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 1 February 2011 at 14h00 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by a Rokot/Briz-KM.
Orbit: 370 km km x 1020 km x 99.5°
Mission: Geo-IK 2 No. 11 was the first of two new military satellites planned for geodetic measurements of Earth's shape, rotation, and gravitational field. It was also designed to probe plate tectonics, tides, and movements of the poles. The craft was intended to operate in a circular orbit at an altitude of approximately 1,000 km, but its launch was unsuccessful when the Rokot's Briz-KM upper stage failed to restart for its second burnas and stranded the satellite into a lower orbit. Communication was establish with the satellite, which apparently functions normally. However, its could be used for its intended purpose only for a very brief period of time. The model 14F31 satellite is based on the Glonass-M bus and so probably has a mass around 1400 kg
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 638 ; Spacewarn No. 688 ; NSSDC 2011-005A ; Spaceflight Now's 1 Feb 11 ; RSNF's 1 Feb 11 & 28 Jun 11 ; China Daily's 23 Apr 11 ;
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NROL-66 / RPP (USA 225)
Spacecraft: RPP stands for Rapid Pathfinder Program
Chronologies: 2011 payload #6 ; 2011-06A ; 6,989th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
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Sponsor: U.S. National Reconnaissance Office
Launch: 6 February 2011 at 12h26 UT, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-8, by Minotaur I.
Orbit: From 500 to 1500 km polar orbit? 
Mission: RPP is a National Reconnaissance Office classified technology development satellite for the Rapid Pathfinder Program. No details are available, but the satellite was presumably placed into a polar orbit between 500 and 1,500 km. “This mission is just one example of our ability to rapidly build and launch small spacecraft with on-orbit capabilities that increase the value of NRO systems to our Nation’s future,” said AS&T Director Robert A. Brodowski. The spy satellite agency hasn't revealed what techniques or sensors the craft will test in space, but the lightweight Minotaur 1 rocket can haul about 450 kg into low-altitude polar orbits.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 638 ; Spacewarn No. 688 ; NSSDC 2011-006A ; Spaceflight Now's 2 Feb 11, 6 Feb 11 ; NRO's 6 Feb 11; 
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ATV-2 Johannes Kepler
Spacecraft: ATV stands for Automated Transfer Vehicle
Chronologies: 2011 payload #7 ; 2011-07A ; 6,990th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
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Sponsor: ESA / European Space Agency
At left, two drawings of an ATV cargo ship and, at right, two photos of ATV-2 (with its crossed solar panels) docked to the rear of the Space Station.
Launch: 16 February 2011 at 21h51 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ES.
Orbit: Initial: 254.9 km x 262.2 km x 51.6°
At docking: 348.0 km x 354.0 km x 51.65° x 91.56 min.
Dorbit: 21 June 2011
Mission: Weighing 19,712 kg, the ATV-2 "Johannes Kepler" resupply ship delivers critical supplies to the ISS: 1,600 kg dry cargo (including food, clothes and equipment), 850 kg ISS refuel propellants, plus 4,534 kg propellant for reboost and attitude control) and 100 kg of oxygen. It also reboosts the station during its almost four-month mission. Named after the famous German astronomer and mathematician Johannes Kepler, it is the second flight of the ATV system, and the first operational ATV, following the qualification flight of ATV-1 Jules Verne. ATV-2 docked at the Zvezda aft port on 24 February 2011 at 15h59 UT. With this doking, ISS has for the first time all logistics vehicles of the international partnership docked at the same time: one Russian Progress cargo ship, two Russian Soyuz spacecraft, Japan's HTV (H-II Transfer Vehicle) and Europe's ATV, truly a moment of historic significance.
     After 116 days docked to the Statin  the ATV-2 undocked on 20 June 2011, at 14h46 UT, and 60 sec later performed its departure boost. The cargo craft performed nominal separation burns. The ship is carrying some 1,200 pounds of trash for the re-entry. Almost all the spacecraft will burn up in the atmosphere, but the hardiest components could survive to impact the Pacific Ocean. The craft burn up in the atmosphere on 21 June; flight controllers of the ATV lost radio contact with the spacecraft at 20h41 UT. Debris from the ATV, including its main engines and docking adapter, should have impacted the remote Pacific Ocean around 21h00 UT, ESA officials said,  at about 43.05° south latitude and 147.02° west longitude, or  about 2,400 kilometres east of New Zealand and 6,000 km west of Chile. 
Note: this launch marks the 200th flight of an Ariane vehicle since the debut in December 1979. Weighing about 20 tonnes, ATV-2 is the heaviest Ariane payload to dateaking. (Ariane 5 ES' payload was 20,050 kg, including ATV-2's 19,700 kg plus associated integration hardware.)  It's also the biggest space station resupply craft after the Space Shuttle.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 638, 643 ; Spacewarn No. 688 ; NSSDC 2011-007A ; Spaceflight Now's 17 Feb 11, 24 Feb 11, 20 Jun 11, 22 Jun 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit, 16 Feb 11 ; ESA's 16 Feb 11, 24 Feb 11 ; ISS On-orbit 17 Feb 11, 24 Feb 1120 Jun 11  ;
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An Historic Moment
With the arrival of Discovery at the International Space Station on 26 February 2011, all the station's docking ports were for the first time occupied by spacecrafts representing the major contributors to the program. On this computer-generated view, Discovery is docked on PMA-2 (left) and the Japanese HTV-2 cargo craft on the Harmony’s zenith port (top, near Discovery head). Under the station (center), there are the Soyuz TMA-20 crew transport ship and the Progress M-09M cargo ship docked respectively on Rassvet and Poisk Russian ports. At the rear of the station (right), there is the European cargo ship ATV-2 and, on top of the station, the crew transport ship Soyuz TMA-01M. This was the only time in the ISS program that transport ships from all participating nations are present at the same time. (The other major contributor, Canada, which do not provide any transport ship, is represented on this view by its Canadarm2 robot arm, at the right of the HTV-2.)
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STS-133 / ULF-5
Spacecraft: Space Shuttle's 133th flight, Discovery's 39th and final flight and 35th Shuttle flight to ISS.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #8 ; 2011-08A ; 6,991st spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spacecraft
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Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 24 February 2011 at 21h53 UT, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit: At docking: 349.2 km x 354.2 km x 51.65° x 91.57 min.
Landing 9 March 2011 at 16h58 UT at the Kennedy Space Center
Mission: STS-133 is a cargo delivery mission to the International Space Station. It carries a six-member all-veteran crew (Steve Lindsey, Eric Boe, Alvin Drew, Steve Bowen, Michael Barratt and Nicole Stott). Primary payloads are the Permanent Multipurpose Module (formly the Italian-built Multipurpose Logistics Module Leonardo), the first human-like robot in space, Robonaut-2 (or R2), critical station hardware and the EXPRESS Logistics Carrier 4. The mission includes two 6-hr. spacewalks by Bowen and Drew. Discovery docked at PMA-2 on 26 February 2001 at 19h14 UT.
     Note: the Space Shuttle lifted off with only 2 seconds remaining in the launch window. The launch was delayed due to issues that arose late in the count with the Range Safety System. Also, major debris from the External Tank were seen four minutes after lift-off (no damage apparent). After the soft docking, an hour was needed (an unexpectedly long time) for the relative motions of the two masses to dampen out). Then the crew enter the station 20 minutes after hatch opening. 
     Discovery returned to Earth after a 203-orbit flight that lasts 12 days, 19 hours and 5 minutes. It was Discovery's 39th flight, the 13th and last flight at ISS. Total days in orbit: 365. Total distance travelled: 238,488,675 kilometres. Total orbits of the Earth: 5,830. Total crew members: 252. Its touchdown was the 76th landing at the Kennedy Space Center. (Photo: Discovery with its payload bay empty following its undocking from ISS.)
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 638, 639 ; Spacewarn No. 688 ; NSSDC 2011-008A ; NASA's STS-133, Press Kit & Status Report : Spaceflight Now's 24 Feb 11, 25 Feb 11, 25 Feb 11, 25 Feb 11, 26 Feb 11, 26 Feb 11, 27 Feb 11, 27 Feb 11, 28 Feb 11, 28 Feb 11, 28 Feb 11, 28 Feb 11, 28 Feb 11, 28 Feb 11, 1 Mar 11, 1 Mar 11, 2 Mar 11, 2 Mar 11, 2 Mar 11, 3 Mar 11, 3 Mar 11, 4 Mar 11, 5 Mar 11, 5 Mar 11, 6 Mar 11, 7 Mar 11, 7 Mar 11, 8 Mar 11, 8 Mar 11, 9 Mar 11, 9 Mar 11 ; ISS On-orbit's 25 Feb 11, 26 Feb 11, 28 Feb 11, 9 Mar 11 ;
Three spectacular views of the International Space Station following Discovery departure.
(ISS, which houses six persons, spans 109 meters (from left to wright) and weights 370 tons.)
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Glonass-K 1 (Kosmos 2471)
Spacecraft: Glonass-K s/n 11
Chronologies: 2011 payload #9 ; 2011-09A ; 6,992nd spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
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Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
A unique scene: a rocket launched in snow; the Soyuz rocket carrying the first 
Glonass K was rolled out to its launch pad in the Northern Plesetsk cosmodrome.
(Note the proximity of trees). Credit: Roscosmos / Spaceflight Now.
Launch: 26 February 2011 at 3h07 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/4, by a Soyuz-2-1B.
Orbit: 19,279 km x 19,715 km x 64.8°
Mission: Glonass-K 1 (Kosmos 2471?) is a 935-kg navigation satellite of the Glonass system. It is the first Glonass-K satellite of the fleet, smaller than earlier Glonass-M. It transmits more navigation signals with a longer design life (10 years). Glonass-K are based on ISS Reshetnev's Ekspress-1000 bus. Earlier Glonass satellites used Reshetnev's Uragan pressurized bus; the new satellite bus is unpressurized and the payload includes both an extra navigation signal in the GPS L3 band and a COSPAS-SARSAT search and rescue transponder payload.  It is not clear whether the satellite will receive a Cosmos designation. The Glonass constellation currently includes twenty-two operational satellites and four in maintenance. The fleet requires twenty-four operational satellites to achieve global navigation service.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 639 ; Spacewarn No. 688 ; NSSDC 2011-009A ; RSNF's 26 Feb 11 ; Spaceflight Now's 25 Feb 11, 26 Feb 11 ; RSNF's 26 Feb 11 ; China Daily's 24 Feb 11 ;
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Glory
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #10 ; 2011 1st failure ; 6,993rd spacecraft.
Type: Earth Science
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Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 4 March 2011 at 10h09 UT, from Vandenberg Aif Force Base's 576-E, by a Taurus XL.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: The Glory satellite carried an aerosol polarimetry sensor that would have provided a global map of aerosol particulates (soot and sulphates) which would have helped calibrate climate change models. The satellite also carried a radiometer to measure the total solar output. But its launcher, a Taurus rocket, suffered its second launch failure in a row as its fairing failed once again to separate. The extra mass being carried by the incident meant that the payload impacted probably in the Antarctic (instead of achieving orbit).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 639 ; NASA's Glory ; Spaceflight Now's 4 Mar 11, 4 Mar 11 ; NASA's Glory ;
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E1P / Explorer 1 Prime
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #11 ; 2011 2nd failure ; 6,994th spacecraft.
Type: Student
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Sponsor: Montana State University
Launch: 4 March 2011 at 10h09 UT, from Vandenberg Aif Force Base's 576-E, by a Taurus XL.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: A cubesat payload lost in the Taurus launch failure.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 639 ; Spaceflight Now's 4 Mar 11
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Hermes
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #12 ; 2011 3rd failure ; 6,995th spacecraft.
Type: Student
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Sponsor: University of Colorado
Launch: 4 March 2011 at 10h09 UT, from Vandenberg Aif Force Base's 576-E, by a Taurus XL.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: A cubesat payload lost in the Taurus launch failure.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  639 ; Spaceflight Now's 4 Mar 11 ;
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KySat 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #13 ; 2011 4th failure ; 6,996th spacecraft.
Type: Student
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Sponsor: University of Kentucky
Launch: 4 March 2011 at 10h09 UT, from Vandenberg Aif Force Base's 576-E, by a Taurus XL.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: A cubesat payload lost in the Taurus launch failure.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  639 ; Spaceflight Now's 4 Mar 11 ;
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OTV-2 F1 (USA 226)
Spacecraft: OTV 2 stnds for Orbital Test Vehicle 2
Chronologies: 2011 payload #14 ; 2011-10A ; 6,997th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
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Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 5 March 2011 at 22h46 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-41, by an Atlas V 501.
Orbit: 330 km x 340 km x 42.8°
Recovered: 16 June 2012 at at 12h48 UT
Mission: Second flight test of the 5-ton X-37B unmanned shuttle craft and the first flight of the OTV-2.  OTV-2 F1 mission was expected to last about nine months, but the vehicle landed on the runway at Vandenberg Air Force Base at on June 16, after a 469-day flight (nearly 16 months). 
     The X-37B spaceplane, called the Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV) by the U.S. Air Force, is a reusable lifting body similar in concept to the Space Shuttle Orbiter but much smaller (5 tons rather than 100 tons). At least two OTVs have been built; OTV-1 made its first flight in 2010. The X-37B project is managed by the USAF's Rapid Capabilities Office in Washington; the vehicle was developed by Air Force Research Laboratory offices AFRL/RV at Kirtland AFB, New Mexico and AFRL/RB (Air Vehicles) at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, with Boeing Phantom Works. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 639 & 661 ; Spacewarn No. 689 ; NSSDC 2011-010A ; Spaceflight Now's 31 Jan 11, 3 Mar 11, 5 Mar 11, 7 Mar 11, 29 Nov 11 , 5 Mar 12, 30 May 12, 16 Jun 12 ;
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NROL-27 (USA 227)
Spacecraft: SDS / Satellite Data System
Chronologies: 2011 payload #15 ; 2011-11A ; 6,998th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
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Sponsor: U.S. National Reconnaissance Office
Launch: 11 March 2011 at 23h38 UT, from Cape Canaveral's Air Force Station SLC-37, by a Delta IV (4M+(4,2)).
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: NROL-27 is thought to be a Satellite Data System communications satellite placed in geostationary orbit. A few weeks after launch, the sky-watchers have observed the spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit and determined it is a data relay satellite. This launch marked the seventh flight of the Delta IV medium+ (4,2) configuration and the 16th flight of the Delta IV family of launch vehicles.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 639 ; Spacewarn No. 689 ; NSSDC 2011-011A ; ULA''s 11 Mar 11 ; Spaceflight Now's 11 Apr 11 ;
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Soyuz TMA-21 / ISS 26S (“Yuri Gagarin”)
Spacecraft: Soyuz 11F732 (7K-STMA) No. 231
Chronologies: 2011 payload #16 ; 2011-12A ; 6,999th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
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Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 4 April 2011 at 22h18 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz-FG.
Orbit: Initial:201.2 km km x 254.7 km x 51.65° x 88.76 min
Mission: Soyuz TMA-21 is a crew transport ship which carries two Russian cosmonauts (Aleksander Samokutyayev and Andrei Borisenko) and an American astronaut (Ronald Garan) who join ISS Expedition 27 crew, bringing the station"s crew to six. The launch took place one week shy of the 50th anniversary of the first human spaceflight, and the Soyuz rocket was decorated with Yuri Gagarin's name (photo).  This is the 110th mission to the ISS, the  71th Russian missions. The spacecraft, which is an earlier 'non-digital' Soyuz version, docked on 6 April 2011 at 23h09 UT on the Poisk module, 9 minutes ahead of schedule.
     Return of Soyuz TMA-21 was delayed by eight days following the Progress M-12M accieent. On 16 Septemvber 2011, the craft undocked from the Poisk module on at 0h38 UT. But just before module separation, Russian flight controllers lost communications with the spacecraft and the crew returned in an apparent radio blackout, with repeated calls from mission control near Moscow going unanswered. Recovery forces at the landing site in Kazakhstan regained communications just before touchdown, but mission control never did. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 640 & 647 ; Spacewarn No. 690 ; NSSDC 2011-012A ; RSC Energia's 5 Apr 11, 16 Sep 11 ; ISS On-orbit's 5 Apr 11, 7 Apr 11 ; Spaceflight Now's 14 Mar 11, 4 Apr 11, 6 Apr 11, 22 Sep 11, 16 Sep 11, 22 Sep 11 ; Aerospace Daily's 11 Mar 11 ;
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Beidou 12 (IGSO 3)
Spacecraft: Beidou DW8 (“Eight orbiter”)
IGSO stands for the 4th Inclined Geo Synchronous Orbit satellite.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #17 ; 2011-13A ; 7,000th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
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Sponsor: Chinese Defense Ministry
Launch: 9 April 2011 at 20h47 UT, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3A.
Orbit: Initial: 192 km x 34,892 km x 55.1° transfer orbit
35,694 km x 35,870 km x 55.3° (inclined geosynchronous orbit)
Mission: This eighth operational Beidou or Compass navigation satellite join seven other satellites already in orbit to form a network which will eventually consist of more than 30 satellites. According to Chinese sources, the launching of the satellite marks the establishment of a basic system for the navigation and positioning network. It is a second-generation Beidou satellite (Beidou-2 series).
     Thie launch marks the first space launch in China this year. China plans to launch at least 20 satellites and spaceships, including the Tiangong-1 space module and Shenzhou VIII spaceship during the latter half of this year for China's first unmanned rendezvous and docking, and four Beidou satellites. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 640 ; Spacewarn No. 690 ; NSSDC 2011-013A ; Spaceflight Now's 11 Apr 11 ; China Daily's 10 Apr 11 & 11 Apr 11 ; China Daily's8 Apr 11, 9 Apr 11, 10 Apr 11, 11 Apr 11 ;
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NROL-34 (USA 228)
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #18 ; 2011-14A ; 7,001st spacecraft.
Type: Ocean Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. National Reconnaissance Office
Launch: 15 April 2011 at 4h24 UT, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's LC-3, by an Atlas 5 (411).
Orbit: 1015 km x 1207 km x 63.4°
Mission: NROL-34 is a naval ocean surveillance pair which carry equipment to track ships and aircraft via their radio transmissions. (One of the two is cataloged by the U.S. as a debris, apparently in an attempt at misdirection.) The two satellites are similar in size and maneuver to stationkeep relative to one another. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 640 ; Spacewarn No. 690 ; NSSDC 2011-014A ; Spaceflight Now's 13 Apr 11, 13 Apr 11, 18 Apr 11 ; NRO's 14 Apr 11 ;
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NROL-34 Sub-satellite (USA 229)
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #19 ; 2011-14B ; 7,002nd spacecraft.
Type: Ocean Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. National Reconnaissance Office
Launch: 15 April 2011 at 4h24 UT, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's LC-3, by an Atlas 5 (411).
Orbit: 1015 km x 1207 km x 63.4°
Mission: NROL-34 is a naval ocean surveillance pair which carry equipment to track ships and aircraft via their radio transmissions. (One of the two is cataloged by the U.S. as a debris, apparently in an attempt at misdirection.) The two satellites are similar in size and maneuver to stationkeep relative to one another. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 640 ; NSSDC 2011-014B ; Spaceflight Now's 13 Apr 11, 18 Apr 11; NRO's 14 Apr 11 ;
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Resourcesat 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #20 ; 2011-15A ; 7,003rd spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ISRO / Indian Space Research Organization
Launch: 20 April 2011 at 4h42 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV.
Orbit: 800 km x 820 km x 98.8°
Mission: Resourcesat-2 is a 1206-kg advanced remote sensing satellite for the study and management of natural resources. The spacecraft carries three visible and infrared cameras with a peak resolution of 5.8 meters. The craft will help officials respond to natural disasters, monitor agriculture and manage urban and rural roads and infrastructure. It will aid environmental scientists in measuring soil contamination, tracking water resources and monitoring land use trends. The spacecraft is designed to operate for at least five years and replaced the ResourceSat launched in 2003.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 640 ; Spacewarn No. 690 ; NSSDC 2011-015A ; Spaceflight Now's 20 Apr 11 ; ISRO's 21 Apr 11 ; China Daily's 7 Mar 11 ;
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IMS-1A Youthsat
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #21 ; 2011-15B ; 7,004th spacecraft.
Type: Student (Earth/Space Sciences)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: India-Russia students
Launch: 20 April 2011 at 4h42 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV.
Orbit: 800 km x 820 km x 98.8°
Mission: Youthsat is a 92-kg satellite for stellar and atmospheric studies. A joint mission between Indian and Russian students, it carries three science instruments to study the upper atmosphere and measure solar cosmic rays.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 640 ; Spacewarn No. 690 ; NSSDC 2011-015B ; Spaceflight Now's 20 Apr 11 ; ISRO's 21 Apr 11 ;
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X-SAT
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #22 ; 2011-15C ; 7,005th spacecraft.
Type: Student (Earth-remote Sensing)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Singapore's Nanyang Technological University
Launch: 20 April 2011 at 4h42 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV.
Orbit: 800 km x 820 km x 98.8° 
Mission: X-SAT is a 106-kg microsatellite for imaging applications. Singapore's first national satellite, it has a 10-metre multi-spectral camera to demonstrate space-based remote sensing and image processing technologies. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 640 ; Spacewarn No. 690 ; NSSDC 2011-015C ; Spaceflight Now's 20 Apr 11 ; ISRO's 21 Apr 11 ;
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Yahsat Y1A
Spacecraft: Yahsat stands for Al Yah Satellite Communications Company
Chronologies: 2011 payload #23 ; 2011-16A ; 7,006th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: United Arab Emirates' Yahsat Co.
Launch: 22 April 2011 at 21h37 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECS.
Orbit: Geostationary at 52.5° East longitude.
Mission: Yahsat Y1A is a 5,935-kg communications satellite with 25 Ku-band and 14 C-band transponders to provide services for both government and commercial customers in the Middle East, Africa, Europe and Southeast Asia. The craft offers Internet, business data and high-definition television (HDTV) services. Built by Astrium and Thales Alenia Space, it has a design life of 15 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 640 ; Spacewarn No. 690 ; NSSDC 2011-016B ; Arianespace's Press Kit, 30 Mar 11, 22 Apr 11 ; Spaceflight Now's 29 Mar 11, 30 Mar 11, 18 Apr 11, 22 Apr 11 ;
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Intelsat New Dawn
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #24 ; 2011-16B ; 7,007th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: New Dawn Satellite Company Ltd.
Launch: 22 April 2011 at 21h37 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECS.
Orbit: Geostationary at 32.8° East longitude.
Mission: New Dawn is a 3,000-kg communications satellite with 28 C-band and 24 Ku-band transponders to offer a wide range of services for Africa, 
including telephony, Internet, media and data networks. Built by Orbital Sciences Corporation, it has a design life exceeding 15 years. New Dawn Satellite Company Ltd. is a joint venture between Intelsat and Convergence Partners.
     The satellite couldn't unfold its C-band antenna dish, although its Ku-band system is working well.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 640 , 642 ; Spacewarn No. 690 ; NSSDC  2011-016A ; Arianespace's Press Kit, 30 Mar 11, 22 Apr 11 ; Spaceflight Now's 29 Mar 11, 30 Mar 11, 18 Apr 11, 22 Apr 11, 11 May 11, 26 May 11 ; Intelsat's 16 Feb 11, 28 Mar 11, 30 Mar 11, 22 Apr 11, 3 May 11, ; 
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Progress M-10M / ISS-42P
Spacecraft: Progress M (7K-TGM) No. 410
Chronologies: 2011 payload #25 ; 2011-17A ; 7,008th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
The Progress M-10M cargo ship prepared for launch. (Credit: RSc Energia)
Launch: (27 April 2011) at 13h05 UT,  from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Initial: 193,83 km x 245,91 km x 51,64° x 88,62 min 
At docking: 344.9 km x 348.3 km x 51.64° x 91.47 min. 
De-orbit: 29 October 2011
Mission: Progress M-10M is a cargo transport spaceshi that carries more than 2.6 tons of different cargo to the International Space Station. It docked with the Station's Pirs module on 29 April 2011 at 14h28 UT. 
     The craft undocked from the Pirs module on 29 October 2011 at 9h04 UT and fired its deorbit engines at 12h10 UT and reentered over the Pacific at 12h48 UT.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 640, 641 & 650 ; Spacewarn No. 690 ; NSSDC 2011-017A ; Spaceflight Now's 27 Apr 11 ; ISS On-orbit 27 Apr 11 ; RSC Energia's 27 Apr 11, 29 Apr 11
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Meridian 4
Spacecraft: Meridian No. 14L 
Chronologies: 2011 payload #26 ; 2011-18A ; 7,009th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 4 May 2011 at 17h41 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/4, by Soyuz-2-1A.
Orbit: 978 km x 39,734 km x 62.8° 
Mission: Meridian 4 communications satellite provides services for the Russian Defense Ministry, and replaces the older Molniya satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 641 ; Spacewarn No. 691 ; NSSDC 2011-018A ; Spaceflight Now's 4 May 11 ;
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SBIRS GEO-1 (USA 230)
Spacecraft: SBIRS GEO 1 stands for Space Based Infrared System Geosynchronous 1
Chronologies: 2011 payload #27 ; 2011-19A ; 7,010th spacecraft.
Type: Missile Early Warning
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 7 May 2011 at 18h10 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-41, by an Atlas V 401.
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: SBIRS GEO-1 missile early warning satellite is the first dedicated satellite in the Space-Based Infrared System, which will be the successor to the Defense Support Program satellites in operation since 1970. It carries an infrared telescope with a large focal plane infrared array to monitor large areas of the Earth at once. An internal movabl 
mirror is used to scan the field of view across the visible disk of the Earth  looking for possible missile launches. This is in contrast to the
older spinning DSP satellites, whose telescopes were canted at an angle to the spin axis so that the motion of the entire satellite swept the field of view around.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 641 ; Spacewarn No. 691 ; NSSDC 2011-019A ; Spaceflight Now's 6 Mar 11, 7 May 11 ;
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STS-134 / ULF-6
Spacecraft: Space Shuttle's 134th flight, Endeavour's 25th and final flight and 36th Shuttle flight to ISS.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #28 ; 2011-20A ; 7,011th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 16 May 2011 at 12h56 UT, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit: Initial: 231 km x 324 km x 51.6°
At docking: 342.2 km x 346.1 km x 51.65° x 91.42 min.
Recovery: 1 June 2011 at 2:35 EDT at the Kennedy Space Center.
Mission: STS-134 / ULF-6 is a crew transport ship carrying six astronauts, equipment and logistics to the International Space Station. It is the second-to-last Space Shuttle mission. The Endeavour Orbiter carries a six-veteran crew (Mark Kelly, Gregory Johnson, Mike Fincke, Roberto Vittori, Drew Feustel and Gregory Chamitoff) as well as the AMS-2 (Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 2) and EXPRESS Logistics Carrier 3 (ELC-3). It docked smoothly at the ISS PMA-2 port on 18 May at 6:14 EDT and. The mission includes four spacewalks and a Soyuz flyabout for documentary station photography. During the flight, Mike Fincke set a new record for the time a U.S. astronaut has spent in space – 382 days - surpassing previous record holder Peggy Whitson.
     Endeavour undocked from ISS on 29 May at 23:55 EDT. The crew performed the Sensor Test for Orion Relative Navigation Risk Mitigation, whose data will be applied to the future Orion capsule. On 1 June, the Orbiter returned to Earth safely on the first opportunity, after a 16-day, 248-orbit flight, It made the 77th landing at the Kennedy Space Center. It was Endeavour’s last flight for the youngest of Space Shuttle’s Orbiter. Since 1992, this ORbiter has flown 25 missions, spent 299 days in space, orbited Earth 4,671 times and traveled 197,7 million km.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 641, 642 ; Spacewarn No. 691 ; NSSDC 2011-020A ; NASA's STS-134, Press Kit & Status Report ; Spaceflight Now's 19 Apr 11, 29 Apr 11, 29 Apr 11, 30 Apr 11, 1 May 11, 2 May 11, 4 May 11, 6 May 11, 9 May 11, 13 'May 11, 14 May 11, 16 May 11, 17 May 11, 18 May 11, 18 May 11, 18 May 11, 19 May 11, 20 May 11, 20 May 11, 21 May 11, 21 May 11, 22 May 11, 22 May 11, 22 May 11, 22 May 11, 22 May 11, 23 May 11, 24 May 11, 26 May 11, 27 May 11, 28 May 11, 28 May 11, 29 May 11, 29 May 11, 29 May 11, 30 May 11, 31 May 11, 31 May 11 ; ISS On-orbit's 16 May 11, 18 May 11, 19 May 11, 20 May 11, 30 May 11, 1 Jun 11 ;
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Exceptional photos taken by spacewalking astronauts
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The eight exceptional photos below of the International Space Station were taken with a “fish-eye” camera during the fourth space walk of STS-134. They gave us an idea of what spacewalking astronauts are seeing. (Click on each photo to view detail.) 

These photos were taken by astronaut Greg Chamitoff as he stood on the left-hand side of the long backbone truss structure which supports ISS solar arrays and radiators. Photo at right shows ISS components depicted on the following photos.

A short video (30 sec.) shows astronaut Chamitoff taking these pictures. The view is from his helmet camera, as if we are him!

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The first pair of images shows the front end of the station on which the Orbiter Endeavour is docked (at left). In front of the Orbiter is the science platform of the Japanese Kibo lab. In the center of the right photo, Michael Fincke is working on the truss.
These photos show the front end of the station as viewed from the middle of the truss. They show the science section of the space station. In the background, the cockpit of Endeavour. The cylinder at the left of the photos is the Japanese Kibo laboratory. The cylinder at right is the European Columbus lab. Between them, the Harmony module and, at the bottom of the photo, the U.S. Destiny lab. The arms that appears on the top left-side of the photos are sections of the Canadian Canadarm2’s telemanipulator system.
These photos show mostly the big truss that supports solar panels and radiators of the station (radiators on the right side). In the top center of the left photo, right of Endeavour cockpit, is the Canadarm2 robot arm. 
These photos show mainly the long truss structure that supports ISS solar arrays and radiators. Radiators are the undulating panels that dominate the right section of these photos. Between them, the dark cylinders are the Russian segment of the station: the Zarya and Zvezda habitation module. On top of Zvezda, a Soyuz crew transport ship (with a pair of wings). At the rear of Zvezda (at right), the grey ATV-2 Kepler resupply cargo ship (with its pairs of crossed solar arrays), On top right of the second photo, the Sun is bathing the station.
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AMS-02
Spacecraft: AMS stands for Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer
Chronologies: 2011 payload #29 ; 2011 n/a ; 7,012th spacecraft.
Type: Space Station Component
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 16 May 2011 at 12h56 UT, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Installed on ISS ITS-S3 (Zenith side) on 19 May 2011.
Orbit: Part of the International Space Station
Mission:
On 18 June 2011, It is reported that “Each day, AMS continues to collect about 100 Gigabytes of data from 40 million cosmic rays, over 2 Tetrabytes of data and 1 billion events to date.”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 641 ; NASA's AMS-02 ; ISS On-orbit 18 Jun 11 ; Spaceflight Now's 19 May 11 ;
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Telstar 14R / Estrela do Sul 2
Spacecraft: Estrela do Sul is Portuguese for Southern Star.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #30 ; 2011-21A ; 7,013th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Telesat Brasil Capacidade de Satélites Ltda.
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Launch: 20 May 2011 at 19h15 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-200/39, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 63° West longitude.
Mission: Telstar 14R is a 4,970-kg communications satellite equipped with 46 Ku-band transponders to coverthe Americas and Atlantic Ocean regions. It is also known in Brazil as Estrela do Sul 2, "southern star" in Portuguese, The satellite replaced the crippled Telstar 14, or Estrela do Sul 1, spacecraft that failed to fully deploy one of its solar panels after launch in 2004. However, the Telstar 14R failed to fully deploy one of its solar arrays, a similar failure to that suffered by the Telstar 14 spacecraft it is replacing. The south solar array has deployed successfully and is providing power to the spacecraft, which is stable and is otherwise operating as expected.  it is expected that the satellite will, at a minimum, support all of the existing services to customers presently provided by Telstar 14/Estrela do Sul, the satellite it will replace at 63 degrees West.
     The communications payload is divided between five beams focusing capacity on Brazil, the Atlantic Ocean, the continental United States, the southern cone of South America and the Andean region, including Central America. The craf has a 15-year desing lifespan. The satellite is owned by Telesat of Ottawa, but probably managed and operated by its Bedminster, of New Jersey.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 642 ; Spacewarn No. 691 ; NSSDC 2011-021A ; Spaceflight Now's 20 May 11, 20 May 11, 25 May 11 ; ILS' 21 May 11 ; Telesat's 25 May 11 ;
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 GSAT 8 / GrainSat B
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #31 ; 2011-22A ; 7,014th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ISRO / Indian Space Research Organization
Launch: 20 May 2011 at 20h38 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 55° East longitude.
Mission: GSAT-8 is a 3,100-kg (dry mass: 1,425 kg) communications satellite fitted with 24 Ku-band transponders to provide direct-to-home TV broadcast and radionavigation services. Its coverage zone includes the entire Indian subcontinent. Built by ISRO, it has a design life exceeding 12 years. The GSAT program has now superseded the old Insat system; GSAT-8 was formerly known as Insat 4G. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 642 ; Spacewarn No. 691 ; NSSDC 2011-022A ; Spaceflight Now's 20 May 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit & 20 May 11 ;
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ST 2
Spacecraft: ST stands for Singapore/Taiwan
Chronologies: 2011 payload #32 ; 2011-22B ; 7,015th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ST-2 Satellite Ventures Pte Ltd. (Singapore)
Launch: 20 May 2011 at 20h38 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 88° East longitude.
Mission: ST-2 is a 5,090-kg communications satellite equipped with 41 Ku-band and 10 C-band transponders. to provide IP-based fixed and mobile, voice and data transmission satellite services to businesses, especially direct broadcast TV operators and maritime companies in Asia and the Middle East. The satellite replaces and expands communications services provided by ST 1 launched in 1998 and that is now at the end of its design life. Built by Mitsubishi Electric Company of Japan, it has a design life of 15 years. The ST-2 operator is a joint venture of Singapore Telecommunications Limited and Chunghwa Telecom Company Limited.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 642 ; Spacewarn No. 691 ; NSSDC 2011-022B ; Spaceflight Now's 20 May 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit & 20 May 11 ;
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Soyuz TMA-02M / ISS-27S
Spacecraft: Soyuz 11F732 (7K-STMA) No. 702
Chronologies: 2011 payload #33 ; 2011-23A ; 7,016th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
The Soyuz TMA-02M spacecraft prepared for its launch at the Baikonur Cosmodrome.
Launch: 7 June 2011 at 20h13 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz-FG.
Orbit: Initial:199.98 km x 257.78 km x 51.67° x 88.80 min.
At docking: 345.2 km x 346.6 km x 51.64° x 91.45 min. 
Recovered: 22 November 2011 at 2h26 UT.
Mission:
Soyuz TMA-02M is a crew transport ship that carried ISS Expedition 28/29 cremembers to the International Space Station. Aboard were Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov and ISS Flight Engineers Satoshi Furukawa and Mike Fossum (who will become ISS Commander for Increment 29). This is the second flight of an upgraded Soyuz TMA-M series with an improved digital avionics system that is more capable, yet lighter, than the preceding model. This flight is the 113th mission to the International Space Station and the 73th Russian. Docking at MRM1 Rassvet module occurred on 9 June 2011 at 21:18 UT, 5 minutes ahead of schedule.
     On 21 Novembver 2011, Soyuz TMA-02M undocked from Rassvet at 23h00 UT.  (The return was delayed by 5 days following the Progress M-12M accieent.) This was followed five minutes later by the planned test of an upgraded version of the new RODK Manual Attitude Control which provides automated attitude control. Then the craft landed successfully on 22 November at 2h26 UT in central Kazakhstan, not far from Arkalyk, in below-freezing weather (local time of touchdown was 8h26). The capsule tipped over, and the crew, which was in excellent condition, was quickly extracted by Search & Rescue personnel. Mike Fossum and Satoshi Furukawa later boarded the waiting NASA-990 Gulfstream-III airplane and brought back to Houston. For his part, Sergey Volkov was flown to the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center.
The crew inside their
Soyuz TMA-02M capsule.
The ISS station as viewed 
from the approching Soyuz.
Expedition 28 and 29
crews onboard ISS.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 643 & 651 ; Spacewarn No. 692 ; NSSDC 2011-023A ; Spaceflight Now's 7 Jun 11, 7 Jun 11, 9 Jun 11, 21 Nov 11 ; RSC Energia's 8 Jun 11, 10 Jun 11, 22 Nov 11 ; ISS On-orbit 8 Jun 11, 10 Jun 11 , 22 Nov 11 ;
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SAC-D / Aquarius
Spacecraft: SAC stands for Satelite de Aplicaciones Cientificas
Chronologies: 2011 payload #34 ; 2011-24A ; 7,017th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Sciences
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Argentina/NASA
Launch: 10 June 2011 at 14h20 UT, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-2W, by a Delta 7320.
Orbit: 653 km x 655 km x 98.0°
Mission: SAC-D is a 1,350-kg Earth observation satellite equipped with multiple scientific instruments from several countries including its primary instrument: NASA's Aquarius sensor package. Aquarius is designed to study the salinity of the Earth's oceans by means of three radiometers and a radar scatterometer. Aquarius will accumulate entire global maps of the planet each week, unveiling how salinity changes across the entire globe month-to-month, season-to-season and year-to-year. The satellite is expected to operate for five years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 643 ; Spacewarn No. 692 ; NSSDC 2011-024A ; Spaceflight Now's 10 Jun 11
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Rasad 1
Spacecraft: Rasad means observation.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #35 ; 2011-25A ; 7,018th spacecraft.
Type: Technology (Earth Imaging)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Iran
Launch: 15 June 2011 at 9h14? UT, from Semnan?, by a Safir.
Orbit: 236 km x 299 km x 55.7°
Re-entry 6 July 2011
Mission: Rasad 1 is a 15-kg experimental Earth observation satellite. It had an expected operational life of two months but the satellite reentered on 6 July 2011, after three weeks in orbit. Iranian TV reports the satellite was designed to produce high resolution maps. "Our glorious scientists successfully put Iran's first image-collecting satellite into orbit," the TV report said. (Iran's space program has expressed a goal of putting a man in orbit within 10 years.) 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 643 & 644 ; Spacewarn No. 692 ; NSSDC 2011-025A ; Spaceflight Now's 17 Jun 11 ; China Daily's 7 Feb 11, 17 Mar 11, 18 Mar 11, 10 Jun 11 ; AFI/IRNA's 17 Mar 11 ;
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Zhongxing 10 / Chinasat 10 
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #36 ; 2011-26A ; 7,019th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China (China Academy of Space Technology)
Launch: 20 June 2011 at 16h13 UT, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3BE.
Orbit: Geostationary at 110.5° East longitude.
Mission: Zhongxing 10 is a 5.1-ton communicatons satellite which carries C-band and Ku-band transponders to provide broadcasting, data transmission, digital broadband multimedia system and media streaming services across China and the Asia-Pacific region. It has a 15-year service life and will replace the Chinasat 5B satellite launched in 1998. The craft is also known as Xinnuo-5 (Sinosat-5), following the merger of the Sinosat and ChinaSat organizations.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 643 ; Spacewarn No. 692 ; NSSDC 2011-026A ; Spaceflight Now's 20 Jun 11 ; China Daily's19 Jun 11, 21 Jun 11
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Progress M-11M / ISS-43P
Spacecraft: Progress M (7K-TGM) No. 411
Chronologies: 2011 payload #37 ; 2011-27A ; 7,020th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 21 June 2011 at 14h38 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Initial: 193.96 km x 240.09 km x 51.64°x 88.54 min.
At docking (about): 373.8 km x 389.2 km x 51.64° x 92.18 min.
De-orbit: 1 September 2011 at 9h34 UT
Mission: Progress M-11M is a cargo ship which delivers 2.6 tons of cargoes required to continue the International Space Station operations. The dry cargo amounts to 1,900 kg of food, spare parts, life support gear and experiment hardware. The refueling module carries 500 kg of propellant as well as 50 kg of oxygen and air. 
     The carft docked successfully on 23 June 2011 at 16h37 UT at the rear of the Service Module under precise automatic Kurs control. Docking probe retraction and hook closure occurred at about 16:57, after motion damp-out. Next were the standard 1-hour leak checking and opening of the hatches (at about 19h35), followed by the standard air sampling inside Progress, powering down the spacecraft and installing the ventilation/heating air duct, and dismantling the docking mechanism between the cargo ship and the Station aft port.
     Progress M-11M undocked from Zvezda on 23 August 2011 at 9h38 UT. After several maneuvers to carry out the Radar-4 experiment, it was deorbited over the Pacific on 1 September 2011 at 9h34 UT.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 643 & 646 ; Spacewarn No. 692 ; NSSDC 2011-027A ; Spaceflight Now's 21 Jun 11, 23 Jun 11 ; RSC Energia's 21 Jun 11, 23 Jun 11 ; ISS On-orbit 21 June 11, 23 Jun 11  ;
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Kosmos 2472
Spacecraft: Kobalt-M
Chronologies: 2011 payload #38 ; 2011-28A ; 7,021st spacecraft.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry 
Launch: 27 June 2011 at 16h00 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-16/2, by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Initial (27 Jun 11):195 km x 337 km x 81.5°
29 Jun 11: 217 x 338 km x 81.4°
29 Jun-14 Aug 11: 215-223 km x 315-340 km
Then: 210 km x 250 km 
Recovered: 24 October 2011
Mission: Kosmos 2472 is believed to be an optical reconnaissance satellite of the Kobalt-M type. It was deployed in an orbit with inclination of 81.4 degrees, which is fairly unusual for satellites of this type. The last Kobalt-M satellite, Kosmos 2462, launched in April 2010, was deployed in an orbit with inclination of 67.2 degrees. This is the first Russian spy satellite launch to 81-82 degree orbit since 1994 and the first to the once-popular 81.4 deg value since 1979; all recent launches have been to the 64-67 degree inclination slots. The satellite probably carried two SpK small film recovery capsules which were jettisoned and deorbited to a parachute landing sometime during the mission
     Kosmos-2472 landed on 24 October 2011. It fired its retro-rocket around 20h35 UT; its descent module then separated, reentered around 20h37 UT and landed at about 20h48 UT, after a 119.2-day flight.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 643 & 650; Spacewarn No. 692 ; NSSDC 2011-028A ; Spaceflight Now's 27 Jun 11 ; RSNF's 27 Jun 11, 24 Oct 11 ;
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ORS 1 (USA 231)
Spacecraft: ORS stands for Operationally Responsive Space
Chronologies: 2011 payload #39 ; 2011-29A ; 7,022nd spacecraft.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory
Launch: 30 June 2011 at 3h09 UT, from Wallops Island's LA-0B, by a Minotaur 1.
Orbit: 396 km x 409 km x 40.0°
Mission: ORS 1 is the first spacecraft to be launched as part of the Operationally Responsive Space program. It is designed to provide tactical reconnaissance to forces in the field. Derived from the experimental Tacsat 3 vehicle, it carries an optical/infrared imaging sensor. The USAF hopes that satellites like this can be launched quickly on need.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 643 ; Spacewarn No. 692 ; NSSDC 2011-029A ; Spaceflight Now's 27 Jun 11, 30 Jun 11
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SJ-11-03 / Shi Jian 11-03
Spacecraft: Shi Jian 11 03 means Practice-11 Satellite 3.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #40 ; 2011-30A ; 7,023rd spacecraft.
Type: Technology? (Missile Early Warning?)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 6 July 2011 at 4h28 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2C.
Orbit: 690 km x 703 km x 98.2°
Mission: It is thought that the SJ-11 satellites are followons to the Shiyan
Weixing 2 satellite which tested infrared sensors. It has further
been speculated that the vehicles may be missile early warning satellites. According to Chinese press: “The orbiter, developed by China Spacesat Co. Ltd under China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation, will be used to conduct space scientific experiments.”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644 ; NSSDC 2011-030A ; Spaceflight Now's ; China Daily's 6 Jul 11, 7 Jul 11, 13 Jul 11 ;
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STS-135 / ULF-7
Spacecraft: Space Shuttle's 135th and last flight, Atlantis' 33rd and final flight and 37th Shuttle flight to ISS.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #41 ; 2011-31A ; 7,024th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceflight
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
The last Space Shuttle mission, the end of an era...
Launch: 8 July 2011 at 15h29 UT, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit: Initial: 155 km x 230 km
Recevory: 21 July 2011 at 9h57 UT
Mission: STS-135 is a crew transport ship that resupplied the International Space Station. Only four astronauts were aboard (instead of the usual six or seven) to make it easier to return them on Soyuz if anything had gone wrong: Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Doug Hurley and Mission Specialists Sandra Magnus and Rex Walheim. Atlantis was carrying the Raffaello MultiPurpose Logistics Module stuffed with resupplying racks. In the cargo bay was the LMC carrier with the Robotic Refuelling Mission box and an attachment plate for the return of a failed Pump Module.
     The Orbiter docked on PMA-2 on 10 July 2011 at 15h07 UT. During eight days, the crew work with the six ISS residents to transfer tons of supplies. Astronauts Mike Fossum and Ron Garan made a spacewalk on 12 July to retrieved the failed Pump Module removed from the ISS truss in February and put it on the LMC in Atlantis' cargo bay, to be brought back to Earth for analysis. The Orbiter undocked from ISS on 19 July at 6h28 UT and, on 20 July, it deployed the small PSSC-2 satellite. On 21 July, Atlantis returned to Earth and touched down on on the  Kennedy Space Center's Runway 15 at 9h57 UT, bringing to an end the final Shuttle flight (see below).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644, 645 ; NSSDC 2011-031A ; Spaceflight Now's 15 Jun 11, 16 Jun 11, 19 Jun 11, 22 Jun 11, 28 Jun 11, 5 Jul 11, 8 Jul 11, 9 Jul 11, 10 Jul 11, 10 Jul 11, 11 Jul 11, 11 Jul 11, 12 Jul 11, 12 Jul 11, 13 Jul 11, 13 Jul 11, 14 Jul 11, 14 Jul 11, 15 Jul 11, 15 Jul 11, 15 Jul 11, 16 Jul 11, 17 Jul 11, 17 Jul 11, 18 Jul 11, 19 Jul 11, 20 Jul 11, 21 Jul 11
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Some Space Shuttle Statistics


135 Space Shuttle missions were performed between April 1981 and July 2011, for an average of one flight every 2,7 months.
Five Orbiters performed 134 orbital launches (plus 1 launch failure) and 133 reentries and landings.
 
Orbiter In Services Nomber of Flights Passengers Carried Time in Space
• OV-102 Columbia  1981-2003 28 161 302 days
• OV-099 Challenger  1983-1986 10 60 62 days
• OV-103 Discovery  1984-2011 39 239 365 days
• OV-104 Atlantis  1985-2011 33 197 309 days
• OV-105 Endeavour 1992-2011 25 160 298 days
Total 1981-2011 135 818 1,333 days
Two major failures: STS 51-L/Challenger, launch failure, 28 January 1986.
STS-107/Columbia, lost on reentry, 1 February 2003.
The Space Shuttle has carried 818 astronauts, 347 different people from 18 countries.
The Space Shuttle has carried:
77 large and 44 small satellites deployed in orbit, total mass 231 tonnes;
24 major Space Station components launched, total mass 232 tonnes;
45 pressurized cargo bay modules (Spacelab, Spacehab and MPLM);
87 unpressurized cargo bay carriers (Pallet, MPESS etc.).
The Space Shuttle performed:
46 dockings with Mir and ISS
31 satellite rendezvous/retrieval/captures.
Total program costs: 200 billion $ over 40 years (1972-2012)
Costs per flight: 1,5 billion $.

Sources: Jonathan McDowell and Claude Lafleur.

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19 July 2011: Last looks at the International Space Station from the Space Shuttle.

The Russian Segment of ISS, which occupied the left two-third part of this photo, 
four Russian transport ships (Soyuz and Progress) are docked.
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TL 1-02 / TianLian 1-02
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #42 ; 2011-32A ; 7,025th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 11 July 2011 at 15h41 UT, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3C.
Orbit: Geostarionary
Mission: Tianlian 1-02 is a data relay satellite which join the Tianlian 1 satellite launched in April 2008 in monitoring flights of China's manned Shenzhou capsule and China's future space station.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644 ; NSSDC 2011-032A ; Spaceflight Now's 11 Jul 11 ; China Daily's10 Jul 11, 12 Jul 11
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Globalstar II-7
Spacecraft: Globalstar-2 M083
Chronologies: 2011 payload #43 ; 2011-33A ; 7,026th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Globalstar
Launch: 13 July 2011 at 2h27 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2-1A/Fregat.
Orbit: 920 km x 932 km x 52.0° 
Mission: Six new second-generation Globalstar satellite, each weighing approximately 650 kg, joined six previous Globalstar 2 satellites in orbit. The constellation is designed to provide mobile satellite voice and duplex data services. They are divided among eight orbital planes to evenly spread the spacecraft across the globe. These new Globalsar have a design life of 15 years. This is the second of four such launches that by late 2011 are expected to complete deployment of Globalstar's second-generation constellation of 24 satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644 ; NSSDC 2011-033A ; Spaceflight Now's 21 Feb 11, 13 Jul 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit ; Globalstar's 11 Jul 11, 11 Jul 11, 12 Jul 11, 14 Jul 11, 9 Feb 11, 6 Sep 11, 4 Oct 11 ;
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Globalstar II-8
Spacecraft: Globalstar-2 M088
Chronologies: 2011 payload #44 ; 2011-33B ; 7,027th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Globalstar
Launch: 13 July 2011 at 2h27 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2-1A/Fregat.
Orbit: 920 km x 932 km x 52.0°
Mission: Six new second-generation Globalstar satellite, each weighing approximately 650 kg, joined six previous Globalstar 2 satellites in orbit. The constellation is designed to provide mobile satellite voice and duplex data services. They are divided among eight orbital planes to evenly spread the spacecraft across the globe. These new Globalsar have a design life of 15 years. This is the second of four such launches that by late 2011 are expected to complete deployment of Globalstar's second-generation constellation of 24 satellites
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644 ; NSSDC 2011-033B ; Spaceflight Now's 21 Feb 11, 13 Jul 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit ; Globalstar's 9 Feb 11
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Globalstar II-9
Spacecraft: Globalstar-2 M091
Chronologies: 2011 payload #45 ; 2011-33C ; 7,028th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Globalstar
Launch: 13 July 2011 at 2h27 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2-1A/Fregat.
Orbit: 920 km x 932 km x 52.0°
Mission: Six new second-generation Globalstar satellite, each weighing approximately 650 kg, joined six previous Globalstar 2 satellites in orbit. The constellation is designed to provide mobile satellite voice and duplex data services. They are divided among eight orbital planes to evenly spread the spacecraft across the globe. These new Globalsar have a design life of 15 years. This is the second of four such launches that by late 2011 are expected to complete deployment of Globalstar's second-generation constellation of 24 satellites
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644 ; NSSDC 2011-033C ; Spaceflight Now's 21 Feb 11, 13 Jul 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit ; Globalstar's 9 Feb 11
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Globalstar II-10
Spacecraft: Globalstar-2 M085
Chronologies: 2011 payload #46 ; 2011-33D ; 7,029th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Globalstar
Launch: 13 July 2011 at 2h27 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2-1A/Fregat.
Orbit: 920 km x 932 km x 52.0°
Mission: Six new second-generation Globalstar satellite, each weighing approximately 650 kg, joined six previous Globalstar 2 satellites in orbit. The constellation is designed to provide mobile satellite voice and duplex data services. They are divided among eight orbital planes to evenly spread the spacecraft across the globe. These new Globalsar have a design life of 15 years. This is the second of four such launches that by late 2011 are expected to complete deployment of Globalstar's second-generation constellation of 24 satellites
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644 ; NSSDC 2011-033D ; Spaceflight Now's 21 Feb 11, 13 Jul 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit ; Globalstar's 9 Feb 11
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Globalstar II-11
Spacecraft: Globalstar-2 M081
Chronologies: 2011 payload #47 ; 2011-33E ; 7,030th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Globalstar
Launch: 13 July 2011 at 2h27 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2-1A/Fregat.
Orbit: 920 km x 932 km x 52.0°
Mission: Six new second-generation Globalstar satellite, each weighing approximately 650 kg, joined six previous Globalstar 2 satellites in orbit. The constellation is designed to provide mobile satellite voice and duplex data services. They are divided among eight orbital planes to evenly spread the spacecraft across the globe. These new Globalsar have a design life of 15 years. This is the second of four such launches that by late 2011 are expected to complete deployment of Globalstar's second-generation constellation of 24 satellites
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644 ; NSSDC 2011-033E ; Spaceflight Now's 21 Feb 11, 13 Jul 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit ; Globalstar's 9 Feb 11
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Globalstar II-12
Spacecraft: Globalstar-2 M089
Chronologies: 2011 payload #48 ; 2011-33F ; 7,031st spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Globalstar
Launch: 13 July 2011 at 2h27 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2-1A/Fregat.
Orbit: 920 km x 932 km x 52.0°
Mission: Six new second-generation Globalstar satellite, each weighing approximately 650 kg, joined six previous Globalstar 2 satellites in orbit. The constellation is designed to provide mobile satellite voice and duplex data services. They are divided among eight orbital planes to evenly spread the spacecraft across the globe. These new Globalsar have a design life of 15 years. This is the second of four such launches that by late 2011 are expected to complete deployment of Globalstar's second-generation constellation of 24 satellites
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644 ; NSSDC 2011-033F ; Spaceflight Now's 21 Feb 11, 13 Jul 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit ; Globalstar's 9 Feb 11
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GSAT 12 / GrainSat 12
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #49 ; 2011-34A ; 7,032nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ISRO / Indian Space Research Organization
Launch: 15 July 2011 at 11h18 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV XL (PSLV-C17).
Orbit: Geostationary at 83° East longitude
Mission: GSAT 12 is a 1,410-kg communications satellite with 12 extended C-band transponders. It is co-located with the Insat 2E and Insat 4A communications satellites. This comsat reach across India, beaming telemedicine, remote education, weather forecasts and other public service information to rural communities. GSAT 12 replaces capacity on the Insat 3B satellite launched in 2000. It has a design life of eight years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644 ; NSSDC 2011-034A ; Spaceflight Now's 15 Jul 11 ; ISRO's 15 Jul 11, 21 Jul 11
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SES 3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #50 ; 2011-35A ; 7,033rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: SES / Societe Europeenne des Satellites (Luxembourg)
Launch: 15 July 2011 at 23h16 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-200/39, by Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostatonary at 103° West longitude.
Mission: SES 3 is a 3,112-kg communications satellite which carries 24 C-band and 24 Ku-band transponders for traditional television broadcast programming and mobile data transmission, broadband Internet and private networks. SES 3 has a mission life of 15 years and It replaces the aging AMC 1 spacecraft. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644 ; NSSDC 2011-035A ; Spaceflight Now's 15 Jul 11 ; ILS' 16 Jul 11 : SES' 9 Jun 11, 15 Jul 11, 16 Jul 11 ;
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Kazsat 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #51 ; 2011-35B ; 7,034th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Kazakhstan's National Center for Space Communications (RTsKS)
Launch: 15 July 2011 at 23h16 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-200/39, by Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 86.5° East longitude.
Mission: Kazsat 2 is a 1,270 kg communications satellite which features 12 Ku-band transponders for fixed communications and 4 Ku-band transponders. The satellite has a mission life of 12 years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644 ; NSSDC 2011-035B ; Spaceflight Now's 15 Jul 11 ; ILS' 16 Jul 11 :
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Navstar 66 (USA 232)
Spacecraft: Block IIF SV-2 / Navstar SVN-63 / GPS IIF-2
Chronologies: 2011 payload #52 ; 2011-36A ; 7,035th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Defense Department
Launch: 16 July 2011 at 6h41 UT, from Cape Canaveral AFB's LC-37B, by a Delta 4M+(4,2.
Orbit: 20,463 km x 21,736 km x 54.8°
Mission: Navstar 66 is a 1,542-kg navigation satellite, part of the GPS constellation which is comprised of 31 operational satellites. The GPS constellation emits continuous navigation signals that allow users to find their location in latitude, longitude and altitude and determine time. It features six orbital planes with multiple satellites flying in each; Navstar 66 occupied the Plane D, slot 2A location of the network and it replacs the Navstar 39 satellite. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644 ; NSSDC 2011-036A ; Spaceflight Now's 16 Jul 11
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Spektr-R / RadioAstron
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #53 ; 2011-37A ; 7,036th spacecraft.
Type: Astronomy
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Astro Space Center
Launch: 18 July 2011 at 2h31 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-45/1, by a Zenit-3F/Fregat.
Orbit: 1,045 km x 332,728 km x 51.6°
1,248 km x 334,727 km x 51.83°
Mission: Spektr R is a 3,660-kg radio astronomy satellite, part of an international network of observatories in a project called RadioAstron. It features a 10-metre diameter antenna reflector designed to help astronomers see deeper into supermassive black holes, obtain views of collapsed stars, and better measure the influence of dark energy on the cosmos. When linked together, RadioAstron's telescopes have a resolution of 7 microarcseconds. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644 & 645 ; NSSDC 2011-037A ; Spaceflight Now's 18 Jul 11, 25 Jul 11
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PSSC 2
Spacecraft: PSSC-2 stands for Picosatellite Solar Cell Testbed 2 (also know as PSSC-Testbed 2)
Chronologies: 2011 payload #54 ; 2011-31B ; 7,037th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 8 July 2011 at 15h29 UT, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit:
Reentry 4 December 2011.
Mission: PSSC 2 is a 3.7-kg miniaturized satellite operated by the United States Air Force as part of a technology demonstration program. It carries two technology demonstration experiments: Miniature Tracking Vehicle (MTV) and the Compact Total Electron Content Sensor (CTECS).  MTV tested the satellite's ability to function as a reference body for tracking stations while CTECS observed the signals from occulting Global Positioning System satellites in order to study the density of the ionosphere. The satellite also carries cameras intended to capture the last images of a Space Shuttle in orbit, shortly after separation.  The satellite carried four tiny model-rocket motors to raise its orbit. One of those was fired on 4 Novemver 2011 and raised the orbit slightly, delaying decay by about 4 days. Based on the otherwise steady orbital decay rate, it appears that the remaining motors were not fired.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 644, 652 ; NSSDC 2011-031B ; Spaceflight Now's ; 
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Beidou 13 (IGSO 4)
Spacecraft: Beidou DW9 (“Ninth orbiter”), Beidou 2-14
IGSO stands for the 4th Inclined Geo Synchronous Orbit satellite.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #55 ; 2011-38A ; 7,038th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 26 July 2011 at 21h44 UT, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3A.
Orbit: Inclined geostationary orbit at 55.2°
Mission: Beidou DW9 (Beidou 2-I4) is a navigation satellite that is part of China's Navigation Satellite System (CNSS). This constellation, which will eventually consist of 35 spacecraft, is designed to provide precise navigation, timing and messaging services. It will initially be used to provide high-accuracy positioning services for users; the civilian service has an accuracy of 10 metres in position, the military and authorized user's service, provide higher accuracies. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 645 ; NSSDC 2011-038A ; Spaceflight Now's 26 Jul 11 ; China Daily's 25 Jul 11, 26 Jul 11, 27 Jul 11
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SJ-11-02 / Shi Jiun 11-02
Spacecraft: Shi Jian 11 02 means Practice-11 Satellite 2.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #56 ; 2011-39A ; 7,039th spacecraft.
Type: Technology? (Missile Early Warning?)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 29 July 2011 at 7h42 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2C.
Orbit: 689 km x 704 km x 98.1°
Mission: It is thought that the SJ-11 satellites are followons to the Shiyan
Weixing 2 satellite which tested infrared sensors. It has further
been speculated that the vehicles may be missile early warning satellites. According to Chinese press: “The orbiter belongs to the country's Shijian satellite family. Developed by China Space Co, Ltd. under the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation, it will be used to conduct scientific experiments in space.”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 645 ; NSSDC 2011-039A ; Spaceflight Now's ; China Daily's 29 Jul 11, 29 Jul 11
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Kedr 1 / ARISSat 1 ("RADIOSKAF 2")
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #57 ; 2011-04 ; 7,040th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Radio Amateur Satellite Corp., NASA and RSC Energia
Launch: 28 January 2011 at 1h31 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a Soyuz-U and deployed from ISS on 3 August 2011 at 18h43 UT by spacewalking cosmonauts.
Orbit: 378.3 km x 395.3 km x 51.64° x 92.29 min.
Mission: Kedr 1 (alls calls ARISSat 1 or Radioskaf-5) is a 30-kg minisatellite designed to transmit 25 greetings messages in 15 different languages, transmit still pictures of Earth, and telemetry data for its scientific equipment and service systems. It is also used for student space education programs, and for the celebration of the 50th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's spaceflight.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 638 ; Spacewarn No. 687 ; Spaceflight Now's 27 Jan 11 ; RSC Energia's 30 Jan 11 ; 3-4 Aug 11 ; ISS On-Orbit's 3 Aug 11 ;
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Juno
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #58 ; 2011-40A ; 7,041st spacecraft.
Type: Planetary Probe (Jupiter)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 5 August 2011 at 16h25 UT, from Cape Canaveral AFB's SL-C41, by an Atlas 551.
Orbit: En route to Jupiter
Mission: Juno is a 1,500-kg planetary probe destined to explore Jupiter ans its satellites. There will be one Earth flyby in September 2013 and Juno will be inserted into Jupiter polar orbit on 5 July 2016. The science orbit will be an 11 day near-polar orbit. Due to the intense radiation environment close to Jupiter, the mission will receive a critical dosage fairly rapidly and is only expected to last about 30 orbits.
     The primary scientific objectives of the mission are to collect data to investigate (1) the formation and origin of Jupiter's atmosphere and the potential migration of planets through the measurement of Jupiter's global abundance of oxygen (water) and nitrogen (ammonia); 2) variations in Jupiter's deep atmosphere related to meteorology, composition, temperature profiles, cloud opacity, and atmospheric dynamics; 3) the fine structure of Jupiter's magnetic field, providing information on its internal structure and the nature of the dynamo; 4) the gravity field and distribution of mass inside the planet; and 5) Jupiter's three-dimensional polar magnetosphere and aurorae. Juno carries 8 experiments to achieve these objectives. Juno is the second mission chosen for the New Frontiers program. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 645 ; NSSDC 2011-040A ; NASA's Juno ; Spaceflight Now's 30 Jul 11, 5 Aug 11, 15 Aug 11, 31 Aug 11
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Astra 1N
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #59 ; 2011-41A ; 7,042nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: SES / Societe Europeenne des Satellites (Luxembourg)
Launch: 6 August 2011 at 22h52 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 19.2° East longitude.
Mission: Astra 1N is a 5,350-kg communications satellite, part of the Astra Satellite System, which provide direct-to-home digital and high-definition television. The spacecraft's communications payload features 52 active Ku-band transponders. Its solar panels stretched some 40 metres across when fully extended in orbit. Astra 1N has a 15 year service life.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 645 ; NSSDC 2011-041A ; Spaceflight Now's 30 Jun 11, 6 Aug 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit ; SES' 19 May 11, 1 Jul 11, 2 Jul 11, 4 Jul 11, 6 Aug 11, 7 Aug 11, 24 Oct 11
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BSAT 3c / JCSAT 110R
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #60 ; 2011-41B ; 7,043rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Broadcast Satellite System Corp of Tokyo
Launch: 6 August 2011 at 22h52 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 110° East longitude.
Mission: BSAT 3c is a 2,910-kg communications satellite which carries 24 Ku-band transponders. It is used for television broadcasting by the two Japanese communications firms. Additional capacity are managed by SKY Perfect JSAT for other telecommunications services, including direct digital television programming. The craft is designed for a 15-year lifespan.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 645 ; NSSDC 2011-041B ; Spaceflight Now's 30 Jun 11, 6 Aug 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit
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Paksat 1R
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #61 ; 2011-42A ; 7,044th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Pakistani's SUPARCO space agency
Launch: 10 August 2011 at 16h15 UT, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3B.
Orbit: Geostationary at 38° East longitude.
Mission: Paksat 1R is a 5,120-kg communication satellite which carries 18 Ku-band and 12 C-band transponders to provide communications and broadcasting services to Pakistan and neighboring regions for at least 15 years. It replaces the aging Paksat 1.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 645 ; NSSDC 2011-042A ; Spaceflight Now's 11 Aug 11 ; China Daily's10 Aug 11, 12 Aug 11
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Haiyang 2
Spacecraft: Haiyang means ocean.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #62 ; 2011-43A ; 7,045th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Observation (Ocean)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 15 August 2011 at 22h57 UT, from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center's LC-2, by a Chang Zheng 4B.
Orbit: Circular, 963 km sun-synchronous orbit.
Mission: Haiyang 2 is an oceanographic satellite which carries a microwave radiometer, a radar altimeter and a radar scatterometer to monitor ocean conditions. It is is part of a system of ocean dynamic environment satellites, ocean surveillance satellites, and ocean color remote sensing satellites. They use infrared remote sensing technology to monitor ocean pollution and topography in shallow waters. It is used to monitor ocean wind fields, sea levels and temperatures, waves, currents, tides, and storms in order to provide disaster and weather forecasting information. This launch makes seven Chinese orbital flights in two months.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 645 ; NSSDC 2011-043A ; Spaceflight Now's 15 Aug 11 ; China Daily's14 Aug 11, 16 Aug 11, 17 Aug 11, 30 Mar 12
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Edusat
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #63 ; 2011-44A ; 7,046th spacecraft.
Type: Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Universita di Roma la Sapienza
Launch: 17 August 2011 at 7h12 UT, from Yasniy, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 587 km x 697 km x 98.3°
Mission: EduSAT is a 11-kg technology demonstration nanosatellite to test solar cells, a transponder and techniques for deorbiting spacecraft. It also carries a scientific payload to measure the flux density of solar radiation, study Earth's magnetic field, and measure incident cosmic particles and rays. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 646 ; NSSDC 2011-044A ; Spaceflight Now's 17 Aug 11 ; RSNF's 17 Aug 11 ;
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NigeriaSat 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #64 ; 2011-44B ; 7,047th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Nigeria's National Space Research Development Agency
Launch: 17 August 2011 at 7h12 UT, from Yasniy, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 693 km x 728 km x 98.3°
Mission: NigeriaSat 2 is a 268-kg Earth observation satellite which carries a high-resolution imagery payload to provide high-resoultion maps of Nigerian territory, and monitor Nigerian crops to ensure the security of the nation's food supply. The spacecraft's imager is taking images with a resolution of 2.5 metres. Imagery from NigeriaSat 2 contributed to urban planning in Nigeria, Africa's most populated country, and also join the Disaster Monitoring Constellation, a network of lightweight orbiting spacecraft designed to assist with disaster relief and track environmental changes around the world. 
The spacecraft  is expected to operate for 7 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 646 ; NSSDC 2011-044B ; Spaceflight Now's 17 Aug 11 ; RSNF's 17 Aug 11 ;
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NigeriaSat-X / NX
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #65 ; 2011-44C ; 7,048th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Nigeria's NASRDA
Launch: 17 August 2011 at 7h12 UT, from Yasniy, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 656 km x 697 km x 98.3°
Mission: NigeriaSat-X is a 80-kg observation satellite equipped with a trispectral imager with a resolution of 22 metres. It was primarily built to train Nigerian engineers in satellite construction techniques. It joins the Disaster Monitoring Constellation, a network of lightweight orbiting spacecraft designed to assist with disaster relief and track environmental changes around the world. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 646 ; NSSDC 2011-044C ; Spaceflight Now's 17 Aug 11 ; RSNF's 17 Aug 11 ;
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Rasat 
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #66 ; 2011-44D ; 7,049th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Turkey's TUBITAK and UZAY
Launch: 17 August 2011 at 7h12 UT, from Yasniy, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 667 km x 697 km x 98.3°
Mission: RASAT is a 93-kg Earth observation satellite carries a multispectral imager with a resolution of 15 metres and a panchromatic imager with a resolution of 7.5 metres. It is the first Earth observation satellite designed and built in Turkey. RASAT is designed for a three-year life in space. Its primary objectives are to advance Turkish space technology and know-how and observe natural and manmade disasters, monitor coastline changes and pollution, detect illegal settlements and urban land changes, and update existing maps. It is intended to replace the BILSAT 1 satellite which ceased operations in 2006. TUBITAK is the Turkish science research council and UZAY is its Space Technology Research Insitute in Ankara (formerly called BILTEN.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 646 ; NSSDC 2011-044D ; Spaceflight Now's 17 Aug 11 ; RSNF's 17 Aug 11 ;
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AprizeSat 5
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #67 ; 2011-44E ; 7,050th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Argentine / Aprize Satellite, Inc. 
exactEarth (United States)
Launch: 17 August 2011 at 7h12 UT, from Yasniy, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 610 km x 696 km x 98.3°
Mission: AprizeSat 5 is a 14-kg communications satellite used for data collection from small fixed and mobile ground stations. It also carries Automatic Identification System transponders to track ships at sea. AprizeSat 5 and 6 were built by SpaceQuest for COM DEV subsidiary exactEarth, Ltd. The exactEarth system also includes the SpaceQuest-owned satellites AprizeSat 3 and 4 and a COM DEV attached payload on ISRO's ResourceSat-2 satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 646 ; NSSDC 2011-044E ; Spaceflight Now's 17 Aug 11 ; RSNF's 17 Aug 11 ;
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AprizeSat 6
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #68 ; 2011-44F ; 7,051st spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Argentine / Aprize Satellite, Inc. 
exactEarth (United States)
Launch: 17 August 2011 at 7h12 UT, from Yasniy, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 627 km x 697 km x 98.3°
Mission: AprizeSat 5 is a 14-kg communications satellite used for data collection from small fixed and mobile ground stations. It also carries Automatic Identification System transponders to track ships at sea. AprizeSat 5 and 6 were built by SpaceQuest for COM DEV subsidiary exactEarth, Ltd. The exactEarth system also includes the SpaceQuest-owned satellites AprizeSat 3 and 4 and a COM DEV attached payload on ISRO's ResourceSat-2 satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 646 ; NSSDC 2011-044F ; Spaceflight Now's 17 Aug 11 ; RSNF's 17 Aug 11 ;
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Sich 2
Spacecraft: Sich meas Owl
Chronologies: 2011 payload #69 ; 2011-44G ; 7,052nd spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Ukraine's NKAU
Launch: 17 August 2011 at 7h12 UT, from Yasniy, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 685 km x 702 km x 98.3°
Mission: SICH 2 is a 175-kg remote sensing satellite which carries optical and infrared imagers used to produce images for agricultural and development planning, mapping and monitoring natural disasters. It is the third spacecraft to be launched in a series of Ukrainian satellites named Sich.  Sich 2 is expected to operate for five years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 646 ; NSSDC 2011-044G ; Spaceflight Now's 17 Aug 11 ; RSNF's 17 Aug 11 ;
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BPA 2
Spacecraft: BPA 2 Advanced Avionics Unit 
Chronologies: 2011 payload #70 ; 2011-44H ; 7,083rd spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Ukraine's Yuzhnoe Co.
Launch: 17 August 2011 at 7h12 UT, from Yasniy, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 692 km x1295 km x 98.2°
Mission: BPA 2 is a 1,910-kg launch vehicle engineering payload which conduct a brief mission to study the use of navigation equipment in space. It had remained attached to the upper stage of the Dnepr during the mission. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 646 ; NSSDC 2011-044H ; Spaceflight Now's 17 Aug 11 ; RSNF's 17 Aug 11 ;
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Ekspress AM-4
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #71 ; 2011-45A (5th failure) ; 7,054th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Satellite Communications Company 
Launch: 17 August 2011 at 21h25 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: 995 km x 20,294 km x 51.23° x 368.39 min.
Deorbited: 24 Mars 2012 at around 13h32 UT
Mission: Express AM4 is a communications satellite which carries 63 transponders in C-band, Ku-band, Ka-band and L-band to provide coverage over Russia and neighboring countries for the next 15 years. It was an Astrium/Khrunichev Eurostar 3000 satellite with L, C, Ku and Ka band communications payloads for the Russian company Kosmicheskaya Svyaz. 
     Unfortunately, contact was lost with the satellite about six hours after launch. Actually, telemetry stopped either during or after the fourth of five planned Briz M upper stage burns planned to occur during a nine-hour maneuver designed to insert the satellite into a geosynchronous transfer orbit. 
     Around 1st March 2012, the satellite's apogee began to decrease slightly, presumably due to tests of the propulsion system. Between February 27 and March 24, the orbit was slowly and steadily lowered and, nn 28 March , Ekspress AM-4 was deorbited on command from the Centre Spatiale de Toulouse.. The satellite reentered over the N Pacific near 40° North and 175° West.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 646, 656 ; NSSDC 2011-045A ; Spaceflight Now's 17 Aug 11, 23 Aug 11, 30 Aug 11, 25 Mar 12, ; ILS' 19 Aug 11, 23 Aug 11, 30 Aug 11China Daily's19 Aug 11, 23 Aug 11 ;
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SJ-11-04 / Shi Jiun 11-04
Spacecraft: Shi Jian 11 04 means Practice-11 Satellite 4.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #72 ; 2011 6th failure ; 7,055th spacecraft.
Type: Technology? (Missile Early Warning?)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Chinese Defense Ministry
Launch: 18 August 2011 at 9h28 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2C.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: The fourth satellite in China's SJ-11 system, speculated by some analysts to be an early warning constellation, failed to reach orbit when the ignition the rocket's vernier engine suffered a mechanical failure.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 646 ; Spaceflight Now's 18 Aug 11, 3 Sep 11 ; China Daily's18 Aug 11, 19 Aug 11, 20 Aug 11, 24 Aug 11
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Progress M-12M / ISS-44P
Spacecraft: Progress M (7K-TGM) No. 412
Chronologies: 2011 payload #73 ; 2011 7th failure ; 7,056th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 24 August 2011 at 13h00 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome , by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: Progress M-12M was a cargo transport spaceship which failed to reach orbit. It is the first Progress mission failure in 135 missions over 33 years. At 5 min. 25 sec. into flight, a clogged fluid line in the Soyuz-U third stage engine's gas generator caused it to shut down. The vehicle reentered after a suborbital flight and impacted in the Gorno-Altai region of Russia. The failure leaves the Space Station crew with sufficient supplies, but had delayed the launch of the Expedition 29 replacement crew until the Soyuz family is requalified. The return to Earth of the first half of the Expedition 28 crew has also been briefly delayed and was delayed for three weeks.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 646 ; Spaceflight Now's 24 Aug 11, 28 Aug 11, 30 Aug 11 ; RIA/Novosti's 24 Aug 11, 24 Aug 11, 24 Auig 11 ; RSC Energiya's 24 Aug 11 ; 
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GRAIL-A / Ebb
Spacecraft: GRAIL stands for Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory
Chronologies: 2011 payload #74 ; 2011-46A ; 7,057th spacecraft.
Type: Planetary Probe (Moon)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
GRAIL trajectorey, from Earth to Lagrange point to Moon orbit GRAIL orbital maneuvering to reach low-altitude mapping orbit around the Moon. GRAIL spacecraft conducting their mapping mission and relaying the data to Earth.
Launch: 10 September 2011 at 13h08 UT, from Cape Canaveral AFB's SLC-17B, by a Delta 7920H.
Orbit: In lunar orbit
Mission: GRAIL mission is a dual spacecraft effort designed to determine the structure of the lunar interior and to advance understanding of the thermal evolution of the Moon. The primary science objectives are to: map the structure of the crust and lithosphere; understand the Moon's asymmetric thermal evolution; determine the subsurface structure of impact basins and the origin of mascons, ascertain the temporal evolution of crustal brecciation and magmatism; constrain deep interior structure from tides; and place limits on the size of the possible inner core. The GRAIL mission was selected through the NASA Discovery Program. GRAIL dry mass is 132.6 kg, fully fueled mass is 202.4 kg. 
     On 17 December 2012, the two GRAIL spacecraft completed their gravity mapping mission and impacted the lunar surface at 75.62° North and 26.63° West at 22h29 UT. On Dec 6, their orbit was lowered to only 15 km above the surface for a final low-altitude data take. NASA is giving the impact region the unofficial (non-IAU) name of 'Sally Ride Impact Site'. The name appears to apply to the general region of the impact, which consists of the two impact points several kilometres apart and any associated secondary debris. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 646, 652, 653, 672 ; NSSDC2011-046A ; NASA's Grail ; Spaceflight Now's 10 Sep 11, 29 Dec 11, 31 Dec 11, 1 Jan 12, 21 Mar 12, 13 Dec 12, 17 Dec 12
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GRAIL-B / Flow
Spacecraft: GRAIL stands for Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory
Chronologies: 2011 payload #75 ; 2011-46B ; 7,058th spacecraft.
Type: Planetary Proble (Moon)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 10 September 2011 at 13h08 UT, from Cape Canaveral AFB's SLC-17B, by a Delta 7920H.
Orbit: In lunar orbit
Mission: GRAIL mission is a dual spacecraft effort designed to determine the structure of the lunar interior and to advance understanding of the thermal evolution of the Moon. The primary science objectives are to: map the structure of the crust and lithosphere; understand the Moon's asymmetric thermal evolution; determine the subsurface structure of impact basins and the origin of mascons, ascertain the temporal evolution of crustal brecciation and magmatism; constrain deep interior structure from tides; and place limits on the size of the possible inner core. The GRAIL mission was selected through the NASA Discovery Program. GRAIL dry mass is 132.6 kg, fully fueled mass is 202.4 kg.
     On 17 December 2012, the two GRAIL spacecraft completed their gravity mapping mission and impacted the lunar surface at 75.62° North and 26.63° West at 22h29 UT. On Dec 6, their orbit was lowered to only 15 km above the surface for a final low-altitude data take. NASA is giving the impact region the unofficial (non-IAU) name of 'Sally Ride Impact Site'. The name appears to apply to the general region of the impact, which consists of the two impact points several kilometres apart and any associated secondary debris. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 646, 652, 653, 672 ; NSSDC2011-046A ; NASA's Grail ; Spaceflight Now's 10 Sep 11, 29 Dec 11, 31 Dec 11, 1 Jan 12, 21 Mar 12, 13 Dec 12, 17 Dec 12
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Zhongxing 1A / Chinasat 1A
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #76 ; 2011-47A ; 7,059th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Chinese Defense Ministry
Launch: 18 Septembre 2011 at 16h33 UT, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng.
Orbit: Geostarionary 
Mission: Chinasat 1A is a 5.2-ton military communications satellite. According to Chinese press,  “Zhongxing-1A was designed and manufactured by the China Academy of Space Technology under the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation. The satellite provides high-quality voice communication, broadcast and data transmission services for users across China.”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 647 ; NSSDC 2011-047A ; Spaceflight Now's 18 Sep 11 ; China Daily's19 Sep 11
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Kosmos 2473
Spacecraft: Garpun (Harpoon)
Chronologies: 2011 payload #77 ; 2011-48A ; 7,060th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 20 September 2011 at 22h47 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: This first Garpun military communications satellite is thought to be a data relay satellite built by ISS Reshetnev.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 647 ; NSSDC 2011-048A ; Spaceflight Now's ; RSNF's 21 Sep 11 ;
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Arabsat 5C
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #78 ; 2011-49A ; 7,061st spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Arabsat Satellite Communications
Launch: 21 September 2011 at 21h38 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 20° East longitude,
Mission: Arabsat 5C is a 4,630-kg communications satellit with 26 active C-band transponders and wide-band transponders over ten locations in Ka-band, which provides a range of communications services across the Middle East and Africa. The satellite has a 15-year mission and will replace Arabsat 2B launched in 1996. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 647 ; NSSDC 2011-049A ; Spaceflight Now's 20 Sep 11, 21 Sep 11 ; Arianespace's 20 Sep 11 ;
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SES 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #79 ; 2011-49B ; 7,062nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: SES / Societe Europeenne des Satellites (Luxembourg)
Launch: 21 September 2011 at 21h38 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 87° West longitude. 
Mission: SES 2 is a 3,200-kg communications satellite which carries 24 active C-band and 24 Ku-band transponders. It joins four other spacecraft in the SES fleet to provide service for North America. It also carries the Commercially Hosted InfraRed Payload (CHIRP) for the U.S. Air Force that will demonstrate infrared detection technologies from geosynchronous orbit for missile warning applications. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 647 ; NSSDC 2011-049B ; Spaceflight Now's 20 Sep 11, 21 Sep 11 ; Arianespace's 20 Sep 11SES' 9 Aug 11, 19 Sep 11, 20 Sep 11, 21 Sep 11, 22 Sep 11 ;
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IGS O-4
Spacecraft: IGS 0 stands for Information Gathering Satellite - Optical
Chronologies: 2011 payload #80 ; 2011-50A ; 7,063rd spacecraft.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Japanese Defense Ministry
Launch: 23 September 2011 at 4h36 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center, by a H-2A 202.
Orbit:
Mission: IGS 6A is a classified satellite which carries an optical camera and telescope to supply imagery to the Japanese government for intelligence, defense and civilian remote sensing applications. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 647 ; NSSDC 2011-050A ; Spaceflight Now's 24 Sep 11
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Atlantic Bird 7
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #81 ; 2011-51A ; 7,064th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Eutelsat / European Telecommunications Satellite Consortium 

 
Launch: 24 September 2011 at 20h18 UT, from SL Odyssey, by a Zenit-3SL.
Orbit: Geostarionary at 7° West longitude.
Mission: Atlantic Bird 7 is a 4,600-kg communications satellite that provides digital broadcasting and internet services. It has a Middle East-North Africa beam with 44 Ku-band transponders, plus a separate beam with up to 12 transponders for Northwest Africa. It is colocated with three Egyptian-owned Nilesat spacecraft to enhance the communications capabilities over the coverage zone. The spacecraft has an expected service lifetime of at least 15 years. 
     This was the first launch by the new Sea Launch company, which is 95 percent owned by RKK Energia. The old Sea Launch, which declared bankruptcy, was a joint venture led by Boeing.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 647 ; NSSDC 2011-051A ; Spaceflight Now's 24 Sep 11 ; Eutelsat's 24 Sep 11, 24 Oct 11 ;
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Tacsat 4
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #82 ; 2011-52A ; 7,065th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Navy
Launch: 27 September 2011 at 15h49 UT, from Kodiak Island, by Minotaur 4+.
Orbit: 748 km x 12,001 km x 63.6°
Mission: Tacsat 4, also known as the Tactical Microsatellite Innovative Naval Prototype or INP, is a 450-kg communications satellite. It is the third in a series of experimental tactical satellites developed under the military's Operationally Responsive Space initiative. The craft features an antenna spanning 3.6 metres and 10 UHF communications channels to aid troops deployed in battle zones. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 648 ; NSSDC 2011-052A ; Spaceflight Now's 6 Sep 11, 28 Sep 11, 8 Oct 11
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Tiangong 1
Spacecraft: Tiangong means heavenly palace.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #83 ; 2011-53A ; 7,066th spacecraft.
Type: Space Station (test module)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 29 September 2011 at 13h16 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2FT1.
Orbit: Initial: 198 km x 332 km x 42.8°
336 km x 353 km x 42.8°
Mission: Tiangong 1 is a 8.5-ton space station module which measured 12 metres long with a diameter of 3.3 metres. It is the first Chinese space laboratory module launched to demonstrate the vital docking technology required for a future space station. It was mainly used to carry out rendezvous and docking tests and to accumulate the experience for the construction, management and operation of a space station. The module is composed of two cylindrical sections with a docking port on its front-end. Tiangong 1 spacecraft is expected to stay in orbit for two years and rendezvous and dock with three different Shenzhou spaceships. At least one of them will be manned and the astronauts of that launch will stay on-board for a maximum of two weeks. First docking tests were performed in November 2011 with  Shenzhou VIII. China's goal is to build a space station by 2020. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 648 ; NSSDC 2011-053A ; Spaceflight Now's 12 May 11, 4 Jul 11, 19 Aug 11, 25 Sep 11, 29 Sep 11, ; China Daily's 29 Apr 11, 30 Jun 11, 19 Aug 11, 1 Sep 11, 2 Sep 11, 20 Sep 11, 21 Sep 11, 26 Sep 11, 26 Sep 11, 27 Sep 11, 27 Sep 11, 28 Sep 11, 28 Sep 11, 28 Sep 11; 29 Sep 11, 29 Sep 11, 29 Sep 11, 30 Sep 11, 30 Sep 11, 7 Oct 11 ; See also Shenzhou VIII below ; 
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Quetzsat 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #84 ; 2011-54A ; 7,067th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: QuetzSat SRL de CV
Launch: 29 September 2011 at 18h32 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-200/39, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 77° West longitude.
Mission: QuetzSat 1 is a 5,514-kg communications satellite which carries 32 Ku-band transponders to provide coverage over Mexico, North America and Central America. It has a design life of 15 years. QuetzSat SRL de CV is a Mexican joint venure of SES Satellite Leasing and Grupo Medcom/Mexico. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 648 ; NSSDC 2011-054A ; Spaceflight Now's 29 Sep 11 ; ILS' 30 Sep 11 ; SES' 8 Aug 11, 28 Sep 11, 29 Sep 11, 14 Nov 11,  [[Quetz 
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Glonass-M (Kosmos 2474)
Spacecraft: Glonass-M No. 42 / Uragan-M No. 742
Chronologies: 2011 payload #85 ; 2011-55A ; 7,068th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 2 October 2011 at 20h15 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome, by a Soyuz-2-1B.
Orbit: 19,235 km x 19,667 km x 64.8°
Mission: This Glonass M, also knnw as Kosmos 2474, is a 1,414-kg navigation satellite. It joined the Glonass constellation that currently consists of 23 operational satellites and four satellites either in tests or undergoing maintenance. The satellite was deployed in the first orbital plane of the constellation. It restores the Glonass satellite fleet to full capability for the first time since 1996, giving the system reach around the world. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 648 ; NSSDC 2011-055A ; Spaceflight Now's 2 Oct 11 ; RSNF's 3 Oct 11 ; China Daily's 8 Oct 11 ;
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Intelsat 18 / IS-18
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #86 ; 2011-56A ; 7,069th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Intelsat
Launch: 5 October 2011 at 21h00 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-45, by a Zenit-3SLB.
Orbit: Geostarionary at 180° East longitude.
Mission: Intelsat 18 is a 3,200-kg communications satellite equipped with 24 C-band and 12 Ku-band transponders to provide a full range of communications services across Asia, Australia, North America and islands in the Pacific Ocean. It replaces Intelsat 701 and has a life expectancy of at least 15 years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 648 ; NSSDC 2011-056A ; Spaceflight Now's 3 Oct 11 ; RSC Energia's 5 Oct 11, 6 Oct 11 ; Intelsat's 5 Oct 11 ;
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Eutelsat W3C
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #87 ; 2011-57A ; 7,070th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Eutelsat / European Telecommunications Satellite Consortium 
Launch: 7 October 2011 at 8h21 UT, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3B(E).
Orbit: Geostationary at 16° East longitude.
Mission: Eutelsat W3C is a 5,400-kg communications satellite which carries 56 transponders, 53 in Ku-band and 3 in Ka-band to provide new capacity for broadcasting, telecommunications and broadband services across Central Europe, Africa and Indian Ocean islands. The satellite  replaced three Eutelsat satellites currently at that location. It has a design life of more than 15 years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 648 ; NSSDC 2011-057A ; Spaceflight Now's 7 Oct 11 ; China Daily's7 Oct 11 ; Eutelsat's 7 Oct 11, 9 Nov 11 ;
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Megha-Tropiques
Spacecraft: Megha means "cloud" in Sanskrit.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #88 ; 2011-58A ; 7,071st spacecraft.
Type: Earth Sciences
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ISRO / Indian Space Research Organisation
CNES / Centre National d'Etudes Spaciales (France)
Launch: 12 October 2011 at 5h31 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV-C18.
Orbit: 780-850 km x 867 km
Mission: Megha-Tropiques is a 1-ton atmospheric research satellite which provides general scientific research into the tropical climate as well as data to watch over the meteorological phenomena in the tropics. It is one of the first spacecraft to launch for the Global Precipitation Measurement program, an international network of satellites led by NASA and Japan to track worldwide weather. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 649 ; NSSDC 2011-058A ; Spaceflight Now's 12 Oct 11, 14 Oct 11 ; ISRO's 14 Oct 11 ;
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Jugnu
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #89 ; 2011-58B ; 7,072nd spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur
Launch: 12 October 2011 at 5h31 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV-C18.
Orbit: 780-850 km x 867 km 
Mission: Jugnu is a 3-kg technology demonstration and remote sensing satellite  used to develop technology and return infrared imagery providing data for agriculture and disaster monitoring. Its primary instrument, the Micro Imaging System, produces near-infrared images of vegetation to allow a study of land utilization. It also carries a GPS receiver to aid tracking, and is intended to demonstrate a microelectromechanical inertial measurement unit. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 649 ; NSSDC 2011-058B ; Spaceflight Now's 12 Oct 11, 14 Oct 11 ; ISRO's 14 Oct 11
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VesselSat 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #90 ; 2011-58C ; 7,073rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor:  Orbcomm
Launch: 12 October 2011 at 5h31 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV-C18.
Orbit: 780-850 km x 867 km 
Mission: VesselSat-1 is a 28.7-kg communications spacecraft used to relay identification and tracking data from ships at sea. It supplements Orbcomms constellation of 18 Automated Identification System-enabled satellites that are currently under construction. The satellite is equipped with two ATS receivers and provides additional capacity, higher refresh rates and improved message delivery speeds for Orbcomm AIS users worldwide.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 649 ; NSSDC 2011-058C ; Spaceflight Now's 12 Oct 11, 14 Oct 11 ; ISRO's 14 Oct 11
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SRMSat
Spacecraft: SRMSat stands for Sri Ramaswamy Memorial Satellite
Chronologies: 2011 payload #91 ; 2011-58D ; 7,074th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Students of Sri Ramaswamy Memorial University (India)
Launch: 12 October 2011 at 5h31 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV-C18.
Orbit: 780-850 km x 867 km 
Mission: SRMSAT is a 10.9-kg technology demonstration and Earth observation satellite intended to monitor greenhouse gases within the Earths atmosphere, and develop technology for future satellites to be operated by the university. The satellite uses an infrared spectrometer to collect data on the concentration of water vapour and carbon dioxide in specific regions of the atmosphere by studying their absorption spectra. SRMsat's primary instrument is the Spectrometer. It also carries a GPS receiver to aid tracking, and is intended to demonstrate a microelectromechanical inertial measurement unit. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 649 ; NSSDC 2011-058D ; Spaceflight Now's 12 Oct 11, 14 Oct 11 ; ISRO's 14 Oct 11
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ViaSat 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #92 ; 2011-59A ; 7,075th spacecraft.
Type: Communivations
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ViaSat
Launch: 19 October 2011 at 18h48 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 115° West longitude.
Mission: ViaSat 1 is a 6,740-kg communications satellite which provide services for North America and Canada. At the time of its launch, It carries 72 Ka-band spot beams; 63 over the U.S. and nine over Canada. it was the world's highest capacity communications satellite, with a total capacity in excess of 140 Gbps. It has a design life of more than 15 years. The satellite is owned by ViaSat, a California-based company; the payload includes 9 Canadian spot beams owned by Telesat in addition to the 63 US beams owned by ViaSat.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 649 ; NSSDC 2011-059A ; Spaceflight Now's 14 Jan 11, 17 Oct 11, 19 Oct 11 ; ILS' 20 Oct 11 ; Telesat's 20 Oct 11
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Galileo IOV PFM / Thijs
Spacecraft: IOV stands for In-Orbit Validation
Chronologies: 2011 payload #93 ; 2011-60A ; 7,076th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ESA
Launch: 21 Ootober 2011 at 10h30 UT, from Kourou Space Center's Soyuz Launch Complex (ELS), by a Soyuz-2-1B. (First launch of a Soyuz rocket outside Russia.)
Orbit: Circular at 23 222 km x 54.7°
Mission: IOV-1 (In Orbit Validation) PFM and FM2 satellites are Europe's first Galileo navigation satellites, their payload being the first two operational satellites. (Two earlier test satellites, GIOVE A and GIOVE B, were launched in 2005 and 2008). Each weight 700 kg and has life time of more than 12 years. They will be joined later by two other Galileo satellites (to be launched in 2012). These four satellites will form the operational nucleus of the full 30-satellite constellation. Together, they will show whether the satellites and ground segment meet many of Galileos requirements and will validate the systems design in advance of completing and launching the rest of the constellation. Once this In-Orbit Validation phase has been completed, the remaining satellites will be installed to reach the Full Operational Capability. The satellites were built by a consortium led by Astrium GmbH of Germany, on behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA). They have been given the nicknames Thijs and Natalia after competition winners Thijs Paerlman and Natalia Nikolaeva.
     The 30-satellite Galileo navigation system will provide high-quality positioning, navigation and timing services to users across the whole world as a civil-controlled service offering guaranteed continuity of coverage. The system will begin to transmit signals to users in 2014 and will become fully operational in 2016. The satellite carries a payload consisting of two Passive Hydrogen Maser atomic clocks; two Rubidium atomic clocks; Clock monitoring and control unit; Navigation signal generator unit; L-band antenna for navigation signal transmission, C-band antenna for uplink signal detection, two S-band antennas for telemetry and telecommands; Search and rescue antenna. The satellite has a design life of more than 12 years. 
Launcher: This mission marks the first Soyuz launch from the Guiana Space Center (CSG). The European Space Agency first began studying the possibility of Soyuz launches from the GSG in early 1998, and officially started this program in 2004. The "Soyuz at CSG" program follows the creation in 1996 of the joint venture Starsem to operate the Soyuz launcher from Baikonur. With the Ariane, Soyuz and Vega launchers operating out of the Guiana Space Center, Arianespace will be capable of launching all types of payloads to all orbits, from the smallest to the largest geostationary satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 649 ; NSSDC 2011-060A ; Spaceflight Now's 19 Oct 11, 21 Oct 11, 18 Dec 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit & 21 Oct 11 ;
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Galileo IOV FM2 / Natalia
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #94 ; 2011-60B ; 7,077th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ESA
Launch: 21 Ootober 2011 at 10h30 UT, from Kourou Space Center's Soyuz Launch Complex (ELS), by a Soyuz-2-1B.
Orbit: Circular at 23 222 km x 54.7°
Mission: IOV-1 (In Orbit Validation) PFM and FM2 satellites are Europe's first Galileo navigation satellites, their payload being the first two operational satellites. (Two earlier test satellites, GIOVE A and GIOVE B, were launched in 2005 and 2008). Each weight 700 kg and has life time of more than 12 years. They will be joined later by two other Galileo satellites (to be launched in 2012). These four satellites will form the operational nucleus of the full 30-satellite constellation. Together, they will show whether the satellites and ground segment meet many of Galileos requirements and will validate the systems design in advance of completing and launching the rest of the constellation. Once this In-Orbit Validation phase has been completed, the remaining satellites will be installed to reach the Full Operational Capability. The satellites were built by a consortium led by Astrium GmbH of Germany, on behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA). They have been given the nicknames Thijs and Natalia after competition winners Thijs Paerlman and Natalia Nikolaeva.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 649 ; NSSDC 2011-060B ; Spaceflight Now's 19 Oct 11, 21 Oct 11, 18 Dec 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit & 21 Oct 11 ;
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NPP / Suomi NPP
Spacecraft: NPP stands for NPOESS Preparatory Project, and NPOESS for National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System.  It was renamed Suomi NPP after Verner Suomi (1915-1995) who was a pioneer of NASA's early weather satellites and flew the first cloud cover sensors on Vanguard 2 and Tiros 1.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #95 ; 2011-61A ; 7,078th spacecraft.
Type: Meteorology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NOAA
Launch: 25 October 2011 at 9h48 UT, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-2W, by a Delta 7920.
Orbit: 816 km x 819 km x 98.7°
822 km x 824 km x 98.7°
Mission: NPP is a 1,976-kg Earth observing satellite designed to collect critical data to improve weather forecasts in the short-term and increase our understanding of long-term climate change. It provides interim capability between the last of the old NOAA Advanced TIROS-N polar weather satellites and the first JPSS (Joint Polar Satellite System) satellite to be launched in a few years. NPP provides atmospheric and sea surface temperatures, humidity sounding, land and ocean biological productivity, and cloud and aerosol properties. In addition to providing data for accurate weather forecasting, NPP tracks ash plumes from volcanic eruptions, helps emergency responders fight wildfires, helps advance climate science, accurately measures the amount of Arctic sea ice and changes in the ozone hole, and monitors phytoplankton and other organisms in the ocean. It has a planned mission duration of five years; however the spacecraft has a design life of seven years and could remain operational for longer.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650, 653 ; NSSDC 2011-061A ; Spaceflight Now's 3 Feb 11, 25 Oct 11, 26 Oct 11, 28 Oct 11, 25 Jan 12 ; NOAA's NPP, 28 Oct 11,; 
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M-Cubed
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #96 ; 2011-61F ; 7,079th spacecraft.
Type: Student
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. University of Michigan
Launch: 25 October 2011 at 9h48 UT, from Vandenberg AFB's SLC-2W, by a Delta 7920.
Orbit: 458 km x 816 km x 101.7°
Mission: M-Cubed (Michigan Multipurpose Mission) is a 1-kg Cubesat for the University of Michigan. The cubesat is thought to be attached to, or entangled with E1PU2cubesat ejected along with it.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650, 651 ; Spaceflight Now's ; 
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AubieSat 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #97 ; 2011-61 ; 7,080th spacecraft.
Type: Student
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Auburn University
Launch: 25 October 2011 at 9h48 UT, from Vandenberg AFB's SLC-2W, by a Delta 7920.
Orbit: 458 km x 816 km x 101.7°
Mission: AubieSat-1 is a 1-kg Cubesat from Auburn University, Alabama.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650; Spaceflight Now's ; 
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E1PU2
Spacecraft: E1PU2 stands for Explorer-1 Prime, Unit 2
Chronologies: 2011 payload #98 ; 2011-61 ; 7,081st spacecraft.
Type: Student
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Montana State University
Launch: 25 October 2011 at 9h48 UT, from Vandenberg AFB's SLC-2W, by a Delta 7920.
Orbit: 458 km x 816 km x 101.7°
Mission: E1PU2 is a 1-kg Cubesa fof Montana State University, which carries one of Van Allen's Geiger tubes.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650 ; Spaceflight Now's ; 
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RAX 2
Spacecraft: RAX stands for Radio Aurora Explorer
Chronologies: 2011 payload #99 ; 2011-61 ; 7,082nd spacecraft.
Type: Student
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. University of Michigan
Launch: 25 October 2011 at 9h48 UT, from Vandenberg AFB's SLC-2W, by a Delta 7920.
Orbit: 458 km x 816 km x 101.7°
Mission: RAX 2 is a 3U Cubesat for the University of Michigan.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650 ; Spaceflight Now's ; 
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DICE 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #100 ; 2011-61 ; 7,083rd spacecraft.
Type: Student
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Utah State University
Launch: 25 October 2011 at 9h48 UT, from Vandenberg AFB's SLC-2W, by a Delta 7920.
Orbit: 458 km x 816 km x 101.7°
Mission: DICE 1 is a 1-kg Cubesat which studies the magnetosphere and deployed electric field antennas measuring 10 meters tip-to-tip.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650 ; Spaceflight Now's ; 
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DICE 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #101 ; 2011-61 ; 7,084th spacecraft.
Type: Student
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Utah State University
Launch: 25 October 2011 at 9h48 UT, from Vandenberg AFB's SLC-2W, by a Delta 7920.
Orbit: 458 km x 816 km x 101.7°
Mission: DICE 2 is a 1-kg Cubesat which studies the magnetosphere and deployed electric field antennas measuring 10 meters tip-to-tip.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650 ; Spaceflight Now's ; 
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Progress M-13M / ISS-45P
Spacecraft: Progress M (7K-TGM) No. 413
Chronologies: 2011 payload #102 ; 2011-62A ; 7,085th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Progress M-13M arrival at Pirs docking compartment on 2 November 2011.
Launch: 30 October 2011 at 10h11 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome'"s LC-1, by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Initial: 192.98 km x 252.90 km x 51.65° x 88.66 min.
At docking: 374.3 km x 403.9 km x 51.64° x 92.34 min.
Reentered 25 January 2012 at 3h04 UT.
Mission: Progress M-13M is a ressuply transport ship which carries 2.6 tons of various cargoes needed to continue operations of the International Space Station. It successfully docked on the Pirs moduleon on 2 November 2011 at 13h42 UT, to the relief of the ISS project (residents will have enough supplies to avoid evacuating the Station following the loss of Progress M-12M). The cargo ship delivers 750 kg of propellant, 50 kg of oxygen, 420 kg of water as well as 1,410 kg of dry cargo (supplies, experiment hardware, etc.).
     The Progress undocked from Pirs on 23 January 2012 at 22h10 UT. It later ejected the Chibis-M scientific microsatellite on 24 January at 23h18 UT. The craft was then deorbited on 25 January at 2h25 UT and entered Earth atmosphere at 3h04 UT, with the debris falling in the South Pacific at 3h18 UT.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650, 653 ; NSSDC 2011-062A ; Spaceflight Now's 29 Oct 11, 30 Oct 11, 2 Nov 11, 23 Jan 12 ; RSC Energia's 30 Oct 11, 2 Nov 11
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Shenzhou VIII
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #103 ; 2011-63A ; 7,086th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceflight (unmanned)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Recovery of the Shenzhou VIII capsule.
Launch: 31 October 2011 at 21h58 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2F.
Orbit: Initial: 261 km x 314 km x 42.8°
At docking: 328 km x 338 km 
Recovery: 17 November 2011 at 11h32 UT.
Mission: Shenzhou VIII is a 8.08-ton piloted spaceship (launched wihout a crew). During its three-week mission, it docked twice with the unmanned space module Tiangong 1. Its capsule carries onboard several experiments, 17 Chinese and German research programs in the field of biomedicine participate, including plants, animals and human cells of the immune and nervous system. First docking occured on 2 November 2011 at 17h28 UT, and both crafst, approximately 20 metres long, stayed docked for 12 days. The Shenzhou undocked on 14 November at 11hh27 UT, reyreated to 140 metres and redocked at 11h53 UT. On 16 November, it undocked from Tiangong 1 at 10h30 UT and proceed to return to Earth. Its descent module landed on 17 November 2011 at 11h32 UT. (its orbital module remains in orbit.)
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650 & 651 ; NSSDC 2011-063A ; Spaceflight Now's 31 Oct 11, 2 Nov 11, 2 Nov 11, 13 Nov 11, 17 Nov 11, 19 Nov 11 ; China Daily's 21 Oct 11, 27 Oct 11, 30 Oct 11, 31 Oct 11, 31 Oct 11, 31 Oct 11, 31 Oct 11, 1 Nov 11, 1 Nov 11, 2 Nov 11, 2 Nov 11, 3 Nov 11, 3 Nov 11, 3 Nov 11, 3 Nov 11, 4 Nov 11, 15 Nov 11, 13 Nov 11, 14 Nov 11, 16 Nov 11, 16 Nov 11, 17 Nov 11, 17 Nov 11, 18 Nov 11, 19 Nov 11
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Glonass-M (Kosmos 2475)
Spacecraft: Glonass-M No. 43 / Uragan-M No. 743
Chronologies: 2011 payload #104 ; 2011-64A ; 7,087th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 4 November 2011 at 12h51 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: 18,907 km x 19,172 km x 64.8°
Mission: One of tht rhree Glonass-M (Uragan-M) navigation satellites. The satellites were deployed in the first orbital plane of the Glonass constellation. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650 ; NSSDC 2011-064A ; Spaceflight Now's 1 Nov 11, 3 Nov 11 ; RSNF's 4 Nov 11 ;
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Glonass-M (Kosmos 2476)
Spacecraft: Glonass-M No. 44 / Uragan-M No. 744
Chronologies: 2011 payload #105 ; 2011-64B ; 7,088th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 4 November 2011 at 12h51 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: 19,160 km x 19,319 km x 64.8°
Mission: One of tht rhree Glonass-M (Uragan-M) navigation satellites. The satellites were deployed in the first orbital plane of the Glonass constellation. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650 ; NSSDC 2011-064B ; Spaceflight Now's 1 Nov 11, 3 Nov 11 ; RSNF's 4 Nov 11 ;
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Glonass-M (Kosmos 2477)
Spacecraft: Glonass-M No. 45 / Uragan-M No. 745
Chronologies: 2011 payload #106 ; 2011-64C ; 7,089th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 4 November 2011 at 12h51 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: 19,018 km x 19178 km x 64.8°
Mission: One of tht rhree Glonass-M (Uragan-M) navigation satellites. The satellites were deployed in the first orbital plane of the Glonass constellation. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650 ; NSSDC 2011-064C ; Spaceflight Now's 1 Nov 11, 3 Nov 11 ; RSNF's 4 Nov 11 ;
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Fobos-Grunt
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #107 ; 2011-65A (8th failure); 7,090th spacecraft.
Type: Planetary Probe (Mars)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Space Agency
Launch: 8 November 2011 at 20h16 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-45, by a Zenit-2SB.
Orbit: Initial:  206 km x 341 km x 51.4°
(Failed to be launched toward a Mars-bound trajectory.)
Reentry: 15 January 2012 at ~17h46 UT
Mission: The Fobos-Grunt, a 13,5-ton Martian probe, was intended to return a sample of the moon Phobos to Earth. In August 2012, it would have performed a Mars orbit insertion burn. The probe would have completed a rendezvous with Phobos and, after some months of close observation, would have landed on its surface. A surface sample would then have been transferred to the 7-kg Descent capsule, which would have been launched toward a return trajectory. Entry and landing would have occurred in August 2014.
     Fobos-Grunt and Yinghuo 1 were correctly placed into a low-Earth orbit, but the Solar orbit insertion burns did not tooke place as scheduled. The crafts separated from the Zenit's second stage and remains in low Earth orbit, attached to its propulsion unit. Attempts by ground control to contact the vehicle were unsuccessful.
     The Fobos-Grunt reentered Earth atmosphere on 15 January 2012 at about 17h46 UT, off the coast of Chile. It is likely that all the debris hit the ocean, but it's also entirely possible that some pieces reached the ground in the Araucania region of Chile. Only about 100 kg of the 13,000 kg satellite was expected to reach the Earth's surface according to Russian sources, while the remainder would have burned up and melted high in the upper atmosphere.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650, 651, 653 ; NSSDC2011-065A ; Spaceflight Now's 7 Nov 11, 8 Nov 11, 9 Nov 11, 11 Nov 11, 14 Nov 11, 21 Nov 11, 23 Nov 11, 23 Nov 11, 25 Nov 11, 29 Nov 11, 2 Dec 11, 15 Jan 12, 6 Feb 12 ; China Daily's 9 Nov 11, 9 Nov 11, 18 Nov 11
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Yinghuo 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #108 ; 2011-65A (9th failure) ; 7,091st spacecraft.
Type: Planetary Probe (Mars)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 8 November 2011 at 20h16 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-45, by a Zenit-2SB.
Orbit: Initial:  206 km x 341 km x 51.4°
(Failed to be launched toward a Mars-bound trajectory.)
Mission: Yinghuo-1 is a 115-kg Martian probe, the frist Chinese Martian probe. Designed by Shanghai Institute of Satellite Engineering, it would had orbited Mars more than 120 times durang one year, to explore the Martian environment and sent back the first Mars images taken by a Chinese satellite. Unfortunatly, the probe get stuck in Earth orbit (see Fobos-Grunt).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650 ; NSSDC YINGHUO-1 ; Spaceflight Now's ; China Daily's 21 Feb 11, 2 Mar 1121 Oct 11, 9 Nov 11, 9 Nov 119 Nov 11, 12 Nov 11 ;
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YW-12 / Yaogan Weixing 12
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #109 ; 2011-66B ; 7,092nd spacecraft.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Chinese Defense Ministry
Launch: 9 November 2011 at 3h21 UT, from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4B.
Orbit: 480 km x 490 km x 97.4°
Mission: The Yaogan Weixing satellites are Earth observing satellites, at least some of which probably have a military role. According to Chinese press, “the satellite will be used to conduct scientific experiments, carry out surveys on land resources, estimate crop yield and help with natural disaster-reduction and prevention.”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650 ; NSSDC 2011-066B ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Nov 11 ; China Daily's 9 Nov 11
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Tianxun 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #110 ; 2011-66A ; 7,093rd spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China (Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics)
Launch: 9 November 2011 at 3h21 UT, from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4B.
Orbit: 480 km x 490 km x 97.4°
Mission: Tianxun-1 is a 58-kg technology satellite which carries a small Earth observing CCD camera. The satellite “will be used to carry out technological verification tests”, according to Chinese press.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650 ; NSSDC 2011-066A ; Spaceflight Now's ; China Daily's 9 Nov 11
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Soyuz TMA-22 / ISS-28S
Spacecraft: Soyuz 11F732 (7K-STMA) No. 232
Chronologies: 2011 payload #111 ; 2011-67A ; 7,094th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
The Soyuz rocket carrying the TMA-22 liffed-off in a snow blizzard.
Launch: 14 November 2011 at 4h14 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz-FG.
Orbit: Initial: 200.89 km x 258.61 km x 51.64° x 88.80 min.
At docking: 372.1 km x 401.7 km x 51.64° x 92.29 min. 
Recovered: 27 April 2012 at 11h45 UT.
Mission: Soyuz TMA-22 is a crew transport ship which carries Expedition 29/30 - Anton Shkaplerov, Anatoly Ivanishin and Dan Burbank - to the International Space Station. The craft was launched in driving snow (photo above). The launch was delayed by 54 days following the Progress M-12M accieent. It docked to the Poisk module on 16 November 2011 at 5h24 UT, and the crewmembers joined the Expedition 29 crew of Volkov,  Fossum and Furukawa on board ISS.
     The Soyuz undocked from Poisk on 27 April 2012 at 8h18 UT and landed in Kazakhstan .
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 650, 651, 658 ; NSSDC2011-067A ; Spaceflight Now's 13 Sep 11, 13 Oct 11, 12 Nov 11, 13 Nov 11, 13 Nov 112 Feb 12, 27 Apr 12 ; RSC Energia's 11 Nov 11, 14 Nov 11, 16 Nov 11 , ; RSC Energia's 31 ct 11, 27 Apr 12 ; ISS On-Orbit's 14 Nov 11, 16 Nov 11 ;
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SW-4 / Shiyan Weixing 4
Spacecraft: Shiyan weixing 4 means Experimental Satellite 4.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #112 ; 2011-68B ; 7,095th spacecraft.
Type: Technology?
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 20 November 2011 at 0h15 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2D.
Orbit: 783 km x 804 km x 98.5°
Mission: According to Chinese press, the Shiyan Satellite 4 will be used for space technology experiments and environmental observation.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC 2011-068B; Spaceflight Now's 19 Nov 11 ; China Daily's20 Nov 11 ;
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Chuanxin 1-03
Spacecraft:  
Chronologies: 2011 payload #113 ; 2011-68A ; 7,096th spacecraft.
Type: Technology (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 20 November 2011 at 0h15 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2D.
Orbit: 783 km x 804 km x 98.5°
Mission: According to Chinese press, the Chuangxin 1-03 will be used to collect and relay hydrological, meteorological, and electric power data as well as data for disaster relief.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC2011-068A ; Spaceflight Now's 19 Nov 11 ; China Daily's20 Nov 11
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AsiaSat 7
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #114 ; 2011-69A ; 7,097th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: AsiaSat
Launch: 25 November 2011 at 19h10  UT, from Baikonur Cosmodrome's LC-200/39 , by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 105.5° East longitude.
Mission: AsiaSat 7 is a 3.8-ton communications satellite wich carries 28 C-band, 17 Ku-band transponders and a Ka-band payload to provide television broadcast and VSAT network services across the Asia-Pacific region. The regional C-band beam covers over 50 countries throughout Asia, the Middle East, Australasia and Central Asia. Built by Space Systems/Loral, AsiaSat 7 is designed to replace AsiaSat 3S with a design life of 15 years. (At right: cutaway view of a Proton launcher with its satellite.)
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC2011-069A ; Spaceflight Now's 22 Nov 11, 26 Nov 11 ; ILS' 26 Nov 11 ; China Daily's 26 Nov 11 ;
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Curiosity / MSL
Spacecraft: MSL stands for Mars Science Laboratory. The Curiosity landing site in Gale Crater has been named `Bradbury Landing' after writer Ray Bradbury (1920-2012).
Chronologies: 2011 payload #115 ; 2011-70A ; 7,098th spacecraft.
Type:
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 26 November 2011 at 15h02 UT, from Cape Canavera AFBl's SLC-41, by an Atlas V 541.
Orbit: En route to Mars
Mission: The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), nicknamed Curiosity, is a 750-kg six wheeled rover, approximately 2.8 meters in length, scheduled to land on Mars in August 2012. The landing site was chosen for its potential habitat for life. After a four or five day checkout period, the rover will begin to move around the landing area. Over the nominal one martian year (687 Earth day) period, it will travel 5 to 20 km and collect and analyze roughly 70 rock and soil samples.
     The mission has eight science objectives: 1) determine the nature and inventory of organic carbon compounds; 2) inventory the chemical building blocks of life; 3) identify features that may represent the effects of biological processes; 4) investigate the chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical composition of the martian surface and near-surface geological materials; 5) interpret the processes that have formed and modified rocks and soils; 6) assess long-timescale (i.e. 4-billion-year) atmospheric evolution processes; 7) determine the present state, distribution, and cycling of water and carbon dioxide; and 8) characterize the broad spectrum of surface radiation, including galactic cosmic radiation, solar proton events, and secondary neutrons. 
     Mounted on top of the rover is a mast, cameras, and other scientific equipment, as well as arobot arm with sample collection devices and scientific instruments. Top speed of the rover is about 150 metres/hour. Power is provided by a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) which produces 125 Watts at the start of the mission. The rover is equipped with four hazard  avoidance cameras, two navigation cameras, and a science stereo camera mounted on the mast. 
     Other scientific instruments on the MSL include the MArs Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS), Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam), Chemistry & Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction/X-Ray Fluorescence Instrument (CheMin), Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite, the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment, the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS), and the Mars Science Laboratory Entry Descent and Landing Instrument (MEDLI). 
     The 3,839-kg Mars Science Laboratory consists of the 899 kg Curiosity Rover, attached to a rocket-powered descent stage 'skycrane' with a mass of around 1,370 kg including 387 kg of hydrazine fuel; both are encased in an aeroshell consisting of a 385 kg heat shield, a 349 kg backshell, and eight jettisonable balance masses (two 75 kg masses jettisoned prior to Mars atmosphere entry and six 25 kg masses jettisoned later). This entry assembly is delivered to Mars by a 539 kg cruise stage which will steer the vehicle during the trans-Mars coast.
     The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) 'Curiosity' landed successfully on Mars on 4 August 2012 at 5h17:57 UT. The rover landed in Cydonia's Gale Crater at 137.4402° longitude, -4.5918° latitude. (Previous Mars landing missions have typically dumped about 1 tonne each into the Martian atmosphere, with about half that as intact landed mass; MSL sent almost 4 tonnes in with almost 1 tonne landing intact.)
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651, 664, 666 ; NSSDC2011-070A ; NASA's MSL, Press Kit ; Spaceflight Now's 3 Nov 11, 26 Nov 11, 28 Nov 11, 1 Dec 11, 7 Jan 12, 10 Jan 12, 16 Jul 12, 31 Jul 12, 6 Aug 12, 6 Aug 12, 8 Aug 12, 10 Aug 12, 14 Aug 12, 17 Aug 12, 19 Aug 12, 20 Aug 12, 21 Aug 12, 27 Aug 12, 27 Aug 12, 27 Aug 12, 6 Sep 12, 27 Sep 12, 18 Oct 12, 18 Oct 12, 2 Nov 12, 13 Nov 12, 15 Nov 12, 28 Nov 12, 3 Dec 12, 28 Dec 12,15 Jan 13, 5 Feb 13, 9 Feb 13, 20 Feb 13, 1 Mar 13, 4 Mar 13, 12 Mar 13, 19 Mar 13, 27 May 13, 6 Jun 13, 22 Sep 13, 13 Nov 13, 21 Nov 13, 9 Dec 13, 2014 Stories ;
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Glonass-M (Kosmos 2478)
Spacecraft: Glonass-M No. 46 / Uragan-M No. 746
Chronologies: 2011 payload #116 ; 2011-71A ; 7,099th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 28 November 2011 at 8h26 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome, by a Soyuz 2-1b.
Orbit: 19,102 km x 19157 km x 64.8° 
Mission: This Glonass-M navigation satellite, which has also been given Kosmos 2478 designatio, joined the Glonass constellation that currently consists of 23 operational satellites and eight satellites either in tests, undergoing maintenance, or in reserve. The satellite has been deployed in the third orbital plane of the constellation.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC2011-071A ; Spaceflight Now's 28 Nov 11 ; RSFN's 28 Nov 11 ;
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YW-13 / Yaogan 13
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #117 ; 2011-72A ; 7,100th spacecraft.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Chinese Defense Ministry
Launch: 30 Novemer 2011 at 18h50 UT, from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2C.
Orbit: 505 km x 510 km x 97.1°
Mission: The Yaogan Weixing-13 is an unannounced mission to collect imagery of strategic sites around the world. It is probably operating in conjunction with the YW-4 radar satellite launched in 2008 . According to Chinese sources, the satellite is “a new remote sensing satellite”. The Yaogan series of satellites gather optical and radar reconnaissance imagery for Chinese military and intelligence agencies. Yaogan 13 may carry a synthetic aperture radar sensor to peer through clouds for all-weather, night-and-day image collection. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC2011-072A ; Spaceflight Now's 29 Nov 11 ; China Daily's 30 Nov 11
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Beidou 14 (IGSO 5)
Spacecraft: Beidou DW10 (“Tenth orbiter”)
IGSO stands for the 4th Inclined Geo Synchronous Orbit satellite.
Chronologies: 2011 payload #118 ; 2011-73A ; 7,101st spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Chinese Defense Ministry
Launch: 1 December 2011 at 21h07 UT, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3A.
Orbit: Inclined geostationary orbit at 55.2°
Mission: Beidou DW10 is a navigation satellite that is part of China's Navigation Satellite System (CNSS). This  “(North Star Navigation Satellite No. 10 10 is also known as IGSO 5, the fifth in the series to go to inclined geosynchronous orbit. According to Chinese press, the basic structure of the Beidou system has now been established. The system will provide test-run services of positioning, navigation and time for China and the neighboring areas before the end of this year, according to the authorities. More satellites will be launched before the end of 2012 for the Beidou network, and its coverage area will be expanded with upgraded services. The global satellite positioning and navigation system will be completed in 2020 with 30 satellites orbiting the earth.
     On 27 December 2011, China Daily reports that the Beidou system started providing initial operational services, including positioning, navigation and timing, to China and its surrounding areas from Tuesday. Six more satellites will be launched in 2012.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC2011-073A ; Spaceflight Now's 1 Dec 11, 4 Dec 11 ; China Daily's 2 Dec 11, 27 Dec 11
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Luch 5A
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #119; 2011-74A ; 7,102nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Space Agency
Launch: 11 December 2011 at 11h17 UT, from Baikonur Cosmodrome, by a Proton/Bris M.
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: Luch-5A is a 1,148-kg Russian tracking and data relay satellite analogous to NASA's TDRS system. Earlier Luch satellites used the large 2-tonne
KAUR-4 bus, but this one is only 1,148 kg and uses Reshetnev's new Ekspress-1000 bus, also used for the Glonass-K satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC 2011-074B ; Spaceflight Now's 11 Dec 11 ;
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Amos 5
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #120 ; 2011-74B ; 7,103rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Israel's AMOS Spacecom
Launch: 11 December 2011 at 11h17 UT, from Baikonur Cosmodrome, by a Proton/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 17° East longitude.
Mission: Amos 5 is a 1.6-tons communications satellite featuring a fixed pan-African C-band transponder and three steerable Ku-band transponders, all covering Africa with connectivity to Europe and the Middle East. The satellite offers a wide range of services, including Direct-to-home (DTH) broadcasting, VSAT communications and broadband Internet telephony services, data trunking, cellular backhaul and video distribution. Together with the Amos 2 and Amos 3 satellites, co-located at 4°West longitude, it provides coverage over the Middle East, Central and Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Africa.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC 2011-074A ; Spaceflight Now's 11 Dec 11 ; Israel's Ahronoth ; Spacecom's AMOS 5 ; Aeroplans: 11 Dec 11 ;
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IGS Radar-3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #121 ; 2011-075A ; 7,104th spacecraft.
Type: Surveillance (Radar)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Japan Ministry of Defense
Launch: 12 December 2011 at 1h21 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's, by H-IIA 202.
Orbit: ~500 km x 97° sun-synchronous orbit.
Mission: IGS Radar-3 is a radar intelligence satellite,
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC 2011-075A ; Spaceflight Now's 12 Dec 11
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Pleiades 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #122 ; 2011-76A ; 7,105th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Observation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: French Ministry of Defense / CNES
Launch: 17 December 2011 at 2h03 UT, from Kourou Space Center's Soyuz Launch Complex (ELS), by a Soyuz ST-A.
Orbit: Circular at 695 km x 98°
Mission: Pleiades 1 is a 970-kg high-resolution imaging satellite which delivers images offering 70 cm resolution (as well as sampled products with 50 cm resolution after processing).  This CNES satellite was built by Astrium on behalf of the French Ministry of Defense.  The MOD will be a preferred Pleiades satellite customer, with priority programming rights to about 50 images/day. Thales Alenia Space supplied the high-resolution imaging instruments. It is the first of two dual-use satellites with a 5-year design life. Pleiades rounds out the current array of military space observation systems, and helps meet the MoD's growing requirement for space imaging.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 16 Niv 11 & 16 Nov 11 ; Arianespace'sPress Kit & 17 Dec 11 ; CNES' Pleiades ;
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ELISA
Spacecraft: ELISA stands for Electronic Intelligence by Satellite
Chronologies: 2011 payload #123 ; 2011-76B ; 7,106th spacecraft.
Type: Technology (Elint)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: France's DGA / Direction Générale de l'Armement
Launch: 17 December 2011 at 2h03 UT, from Kourou Space Center's Soyuz Launch Complex (ELS), by a Soyuz ST-A.
Orbit: Circular at 700 km x 98°
Mission: The four 120-kg ELISA demonstrator satellites will enable French defense procurement agency DGA to test the space-based mapping of radar transmitters across the planet. The DGA and CNES are co-project authorities and chose Astrium and Thales Airborne Systems to build the four satellites. Each craf has a design life time of over 3 years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 16 Niv 11 & 16 Nov 11 ; Arianespace'sPress Kit & 17 Dec 11 ;
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ELISA
Spacecraft: ELISA stands for Electronic Intelligence by Satellite
Chronologies: 2011 payload #124 ; 2011-76C ; 7,107th spacecraft.
Type: Technology (Elint)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: France's DGA / Direction Générale de l'Armement
Launch: 17 December 2011 at 2h03 UT, from Kourou Space Center's Soyuz Launch Complex (ELS), by a Soyuz ST-A.
Orbit: Circular at 700 km x 98°
Mission: The four 120-kg ELISA demonstrator satellites will enable French defense procurement agency DGA to test the space-based mapping of radar transmitters across the planet. The DGA and CNES are co-project authorities and chose Astrium and Thales Airborne Systems to build the four satellites. Each craf has a design life time of over 3 years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 16 Niv 11 & 16 Nov 11 ; Arianespace'sPress Kit & 17 Dec 11 ;
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ELISA
Spacecraft: ELISA stands for Electronic Intelligence by Satellite
Chronologies: 2011 payload #125 ; 2011-76D ; 7,108th spacecraft.
Type: Technology (Elint)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: France's DGA / Direction Générale de l'Armement
Launch: 17 December 2011 at 2h03 UT, from Kourou Space Center's Soyuz Launch Complex (ELS), by a Soyuz ST-A.
Orbit: Circular at 700 km x 98°
Mission: The four 120-kg ELISA demonstrator satellites will enable French defense procurement agency DGA to test the space-based mapping of radar transmitters across the planet. The DGA and CNES are co-project authorities and chose Astrium and Thales Airborne Systems to build the four satellites. Each craf has a design life time of over 3 years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 16 Niv 11 & 16 Nov 11 ; Arianespace'sPress Kit & 17 Dec 11 ;
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ELISA
Spacecraft: ELISA stands for Electronic Intelligence by Satellite
Chronologies: 2011 payload #126 ; 2011-76E ; 7,109th spacecraft.
Type: Technology (Elint)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: France's DGA / Direction Générale de l'Armement
Launch: 17 December 2011 at 2h03 UT, from Kourou Space Center's Soyuz Launch Complex (ELS), by a Soyuz ST-A.
Orbit: Circular at 700 km x 98°
Mission: The four 120-kg ELISA demonstrator satellites will enable French defense procurement agency DGA to test the space-based mapping of radar transmitters across the planet. The DGA and CNES are co-project authorities and chose Astrium and Thales Airborne Systems to build the four satellites. Each craf has a design life time of over 3 years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 16 Niv 11 & 16 Nov 11 ; Arianespace'sPress Kit & 17 Dec 11 ;
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SSOT / Fasat-Charlie
Spacecraft: SSOT stands for Sistema Satelital para Observaciòn de la Tierra
Chronologies: 2011 payload #127 ; 2011-76F ; 7,110th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families: Earth Observation
Ranks:
Sponsor: Chilean armed forces
Launch: 17 December 2011 at 2h03 UT, from Kourou Space Center's Soyuz Launch Complex (ELS), by a Soyuz ST-A.
Orbit: Circular at 610 km x 98°
Mission: SSOT is a 117-kg Earth observation satellite which provides to the Chilean armed forces very high quality (1.45-meter resolution) images for various applications, including mapping, agriculture and the management of natural resources, disasters and risks. The satellite was built by Astrium in conjunction with CNES. (I has a design life of  5 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 16 Niv 11 & 16 Nov 11 ; Arianespace'sPress Kit & 17 Dec 11 ;
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Nigcomsat 1R
Spacecraft: Nigcomsat stands for Nigerian Communication Satellite
Chronologies: 2011 payload #128 ; 2011-77A ; 7,111th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Nigeria's Nigcomsat Ltd.
Launch of Nigcomsat 1R by a Chang Zheng 3B rocket. (Photos: China Daily)
Launch: 19 December 2011 at 16h41 UT, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3B.
Orbit: Geosynstationay at 42.5° East longitude.
Mission: Nigcomsat 1R Is a 5,800-kg communications satellite with 28 transponders in C-band, Ku-band, Ka-band and L-band to serve Africans with television, education, navigation and security services. Its C-band payload reaches across Africa, while its Ku-band transponders are aimed at regions of southwestern Africa and China. The Ka-band system are wired into spot beams focused on Europe, Nigeria and South Africa. Two L-band navigation channels make for more accurate satellite positioning services in Africa. Nigcomsat 1R is based on China's DFH-4 spacecraft platform. Operated by Nigcomsat Ltd., a communications firm owned by the Nigerian government, the craft had been designed to work for at least 15 years.
     Nigcomsat 1R replaces Nigcomsat 1 launched in 2007, which failed in orbit due to the malfunction of a solar array deployment assembly 18 months after it was launched. Nigeria became the first foreign buyer of both Chinese satellite and launch service. Thus, the failure was unfortunate both for China and Nigeria, for the satellite was urgently needed to boost Nigeria's and Africa's telecommunications and its failure could damage China's reputation in the global satellite export market. Thus, China decided to take the responsibility, building and launching a replacement satellite with no additional cost to Nigeria. China added several upgrades to Nigcomsat 1R to improve its performance over the preceding Nigcomsat 1 satellite.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 19 Dec 11, 19 Dec 11 ; China Daily's 20 Dec 11 ;
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Soyuz TMA-03M  / ISS-29S
Spacecraft: Soyuz 11F732 (7K-STMA) No. 703
Chronologies: 2011 payload #129 ; 2011-78A ; 7,112th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
The Soyuz TMA-03M 
docked ar the rear of ISS.
Launch: 21 December 2011 at 13h16 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz-FG
Orbit: Initial: 198.93 km x 267.02 km x 51.65° x 88.87 min. 
At docking: 375.3 km x 408.6 km x 51.64° x 92.40 min.
Recovered: 1 July 2012 at 8h14:48 UT.
Mission: Soyuz TMA-03M is a manned transport spacecraft carrying ISS Expedition 30/31 crew of Oleg Kononenko, Andre Kuipers and Donald Pettit to the International Space Station. The craft was launched on time on a bittterly cold but clear weather. The aunch was delayed by three weeks following the Progress M-12M accieent. (Photo: the cold temperature at Baikonur made clearly visible vapor emanation from the Soyuz launcher prior to lift-off.) The transport craft is also carrying 172 kg of cargo, totaling 117 items (35 Russian, 57 NASA, 21 ESA, 4 JAXA). This is the 118th flight (piloted and cargo) toward ISS.  Soyuz TMA-03M docked successfully on 23 December 2011 at 15:19 UT at the MRM1 “Rassvet” module, 4 minutes ahead of schedule and right at orbital sunset.
     On 1st July 2012, the Soyuz undocked from ISS at  at 4h48 UT and the capsule touched down in Kazakhstan at 8h14:48 UT..
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651, 652, 661 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ;NASA's Expedition 30Spaceflight Now's 20 Dec 11, 21 Dec 11, 21 Dec 11, 23 Dec 11, 1 Jul 12 ; RSC Energia's Exp. 30/31, 21 Dec 11, 23 Dec 11, 1 Jul 12 ; ISS On-orbit's 21 Dec 11, 23 Dec 11, 1 Jul 12 ;
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ZY-1 02C / Ziyuan I-02C
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #130 ; 2011-79A ; 7,113th spacecraft.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 22 December 2011 at 3h26 UT, from Taiyuan Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4B.
Orbit: 770 km
Mission: Ziyuan I-02C is probably a high-resolution military photo surveillance satellite. According to Chinese press, the satellite is a high-resolution remote-sensing satellite: “Developed and produced by the China Academy of Space Technology, it is the country's first such orbiter that can acquire high-resolution data through remote-sensing, marking a key technological leap forward. According to the center, the satellite can conduct land resources surveys, reduce natural disasters, aid agriculture development and manage water resources.” (Photos: Ziyuan I-02C carrier rocket on its launching pad at the Xichang Taiyuan Launch Center.)
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's ; China Daily's 22 Dec 11 , 1 Mar 12 ;
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Meridian (5)
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2011 payload #131 ; 2011 10th failure ; 7,114th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 23 December 2011 at 12h08 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome, by a Soyuz-2-1b.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: This 5th Meridian communications satellite would have provides services for the Russian Defense Ministry, and replaces the older Molniya satellites. It failed to reach orbit when the launcher's 3rd stage malfunctioned. The problem occurred about seven minutes after liftoff, when the Soyuz rocket's third stage RD-0124 engine was thrusting to propel the Meridian and its Fregat rocket stage into space. The assembly fall in Siberia, near Novosibirsk. No injuries were reported, but some Russian news agencies said the crash resulted in property damage.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 651, 652 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 23 Dec 11 ; RNSF's 23 Dec 11 ;
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Globalstar II-13
Spacecraft: Globalstar M084
Chronologies: 2011 payload #132 ; 2011-80A ; 7,115th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Globalstar
Globalstar launch profile (see Arianespace's Press Kit)
Launch: 28 Decemb er 2011 at 17h09 UT, from Baikonur Cosmodrome, by a Soyuz-2-1a.
Orbit: Circular at 920 km x 52°.
Mission: Second generation Globalstar are 700-kg communications satellites fitted with 16 transponders from C-to S-band, and 16 receivers from L-to C-band to support mobile voice and data services. The advanced constellation will also provide customers with enhanced services featuring increased data speeds of up to 256 kbps in a flexible Internet protocol multimedia subsystem configuration. Each satellite is a three-axis stabilized craft consisting of a trapezoidal main body with two solar arrays. Each has a design life of 15 years or twice the design life of the first-generation Globalstar satellite. Four launches of six satellites each are conducted by Arianespace using the Soyuz launch vehicle (first launch occurred in October 2010, the second in July 2011, the third in December 2011 and the fourth in early 2012).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 652 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 27 Dec 11, 28 Dec 11 ; Globalstar's 17 Aug 11, 12 Sep 11, 15 Sep 11, 29 Nov 11, 27 Dec 11, 28 Dec 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit, 28 Dec 11 ;
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Globalstar II-14
Spacecraft: Globalstar M080
Chronologies: 2011 payload #133 ; 2011-80B ; 7,116th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Globalstar
Launch: 28 Decemb er 2011 at 17h09 UT, from Baikonur Cosmodrome, by a Soyuz-2-1a.
Orbit: Circular at 920 km x 52°.
Mission: Second generation Globalstar are 700-kg communications satellites fitted with 16 transponders from C-to S-band, and 16 receivers from L-to C-band to support mobile voice and data services. The advanced constellation will also provide customers with enhanced services featuring increased data speeds of up to 256 kbps in a flexible Internet protocol multimedia subsystem configuration. Each satellite is a three-axis stabilized craft consisting of a trapezoidal main body with two solar arrays. Each has a design life of 15 years or twice the design life of the first-generation Globalstar satellite. Four launches of six satellites each are conducted by Arianespace using the Soyuz launch vehicle (first launch occurred in October 2010, the second in July 2011, the third in December 2011 and the fourth in early 2012).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 652 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 27 Dec 11, 28 Dec 11 ; Globalstar's 17 Aug 11, 12 Sep 11, 15 Sep 11, 29 Nov 11, 27 Dec 11, 28 Dec 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit, 28 Dec 11 ;
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Globalstar II-15
Spacecraft: Globalstar M082
Chronologies: 2011 payload #134 ; 2011-80C ; 7,117th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Globalstar
Launch: 28 Decemb er 2011 at 17h09 UT, from Baikonur Cosmodrome, by a Soyuz-2-1a.
Orbit: Circular at 920 km x 52°.
Mission: Second generation Globalstar are 700-kg communications satellites fitted with 16 transponders from C-to S-band, and 16 receivers from L-to C-band to support mobile voice and data services. The advanced constellation will also provide customers with enhanced services featuring increased data speeds of up to 256 kbps in a flexible Internet protocol multimedia subsystem configuration. Each satellite is a three-axis stabilized craft consisting of a trapezoidal main body with two solar arrays. Each has a design life of 15 years or twice the design life of the first-generation Globalstar satellite. Four launches of six satellites each are conducted by Arianespace using the Soyuz launch vehicle (first launch occurred in October 2010, the second in July 2011, the third in December 2011 and the fourth in early 2012).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 652 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 27 Dec 11, 28 Dec 11 ; Globalstar's 17 Aug 11, 12 Sep 11, 15 Sep 11, 29 Nov 11, 27 Dec 11, 28 Dec 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit, 28 Dec 11 ;
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Globalstar II-16
Spacecraft: Globalstar M092
Chronologies: 2011 payload #135 ; 2011-80D ; 7,118th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Globalstar
Launch: 28 Decemb er 2011 at 17h09 UT, from Baikonur Cosmodrome, by a Soyuz-2-1a.
Orbit: Circular at 920 km x 52°.
Mission: Second generation Globalstar are 700-kg communications satellites fitted with 16 transponders from C-to S-band, and 16 receivers from L-to C-band to support mobile voice and data services. The advanced constellation will also provide customers with enhanced services featuring increased data speeds of up to 256 kbps in a flexible Internet protocol multimedia subsystem configuration. Each satellite is a three-axis stabilized craft consisting of a trapezoidal main body with two solar arrays. Each has a design life of 15 years or twice the design life of the first-generation Globalstar satellite. Four launches of six satellites each are conducted by Arianespace using the Soyuz launch vehicle (first launch occurred in October 2010, the second in July 2011, the third in December 2011 and the fourth in early 2012).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 652 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 27 Dec 11, 28 Dec 11 ; Globalstar's 17 Aug 11, 12 Sep 11, 15 Sep 11, 29 Nov 11, 27 Dec 11, 28 Dec 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit, 28 Dec 11 ;
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Globalstar II-17
Spacecraft: Globalstar M090
Chronologies: 2011 payload #136 ; 2011-80E ; 7,119th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Globalstar
Launch: 28 Decemb er 2011 at 17h09 UT, from Baikonur Cosmodrome, by a Soyuz-2-1a.
Orbit: Circular at 920 km x 52°.
Mission: Second generation Globalstar are 700-kg communications satellites fitted with 16 transponders from C-to S-band, and 16 receivers from L-to C-band to support mobile voice and data services. The advanced constellation will also provide customers with enhanced services featuring increased data speeds of up to 256 kbps in a flexible Internet protocol multimedia subsystem configuration. Each satellite is a three-axis stabilized craft consisting of a trapezoidal main body with two solar arrays. Each has a design life of 15 years or twice the design life of the first-generation Globalstar satellite. Four launches of six satellites each are conducted by Arianespace using the Soyuz launch vehicle (first launch occurred in October 2010, the second in July 2011, the third in December 2011 and the fourth in early 2012).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 652 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 27 Dec 11, 28 Dec 11 ; Globalstar's 17 Aug 11, 12 Sep 11, 15 Sep 11, 29 Nov 11, 27 Dec 11, 28 Dec 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit, 28 Dec 11 ;
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Globalstar II-18
Spacecraft: Globalstar M086
Chronologies: 2011 payload #137 ; 2011-80F ; 7,120th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Globalstar
Launch: 28 Decemb er 2011 at 17h09 UT, from Baikonur Cosmodrome, by a Soyuz-2-1a.
Orbit: Circular at 920 km x 52°.
Mission: Second generation Globalstar are 700-kg communications satellites fitted with 16 transponders from C-to S-band, and 16 receivers from L-to C-band to support mobile voice and data services. The advanced constellation will also provide customers with enhanced services featuring increased data speeds of up to 256 kbps in a flexible Internet protocol multimedia subsystem configuration. Each satellite is a three-axis stabilized craft consisting of a trapezoidal main body with two solar arrays. Each has a design life of 15 years or twice the design life of the first-generation Globalstar satellite. Four launches of six satellites each are conducted by Arianespace using the Soyuz launch vehicle (first launch occurred in October 2010, the second in July 2011, the third in December 2011 and the fourth in early 2012).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 652 ; NSSDC 2011-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 27 Dec 11, 28 Dec 11 ; Globalstar's 17 Aug 11, 12 Sep 11, 15 Sep 11, 29 Nov 11, 27 Dec 11, 28 Dec 11 ; Arianespace's Press Kit, 28 Dec 11 ;
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© Claude Lafleur, 2011 Mes sites web: claudelafleur.qc.ca