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Home 2000 Summary
1999 spacecrafts 2001 spacecrafts
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The 131 spacecrafts launched in 2000 :
1) DSCS III B-8 (USA 148) 2) Galaxy 10R 3) Feng Huo 1 / Zhongxing 22 4) JAWSAT
5) OCS / OCSE 6) OPAL 7) FalconSat 1 8) ASUSAT
9) Progress M1-1 10) Kosmos 2369 / Tselina-2 11) Hispasat 1C 12) Picosat 21 / MEMS 1
13) Picosat 23 / MEMS 2 14) Globalstar 60 15) Globalstar 62 16) Globalstar 63
17) Globalstar 64 18) IRDT 19) Gruzovoy Maket Dummy satellite 20) Fregat / Fregat RB/Cluster 2
21) Astro E 22) JAK Artemis Picosat 23) STENSAT 24) STS-99 - SLR-3
25) Garuda 1 (ACES) 26) Thelm aArtemis Picosat (Thunder) 27) Louise Artemis Picosat (Lightnin) 28) Superbird 4
29) Ekspress A2 30) MTI 31) ICO F-1 32) Dumsat
33) Asiastar 34) Insat 3B 35) IMAGE 36) Soyuz TM-30
37) Sesat 38) Galaxy IVR 39) Progress M1-2 40) GOES 11
41) Kosmos 2370 / Yantar-4KS1 42) DSP 20 (USA 149) 43) Navstar 43 (USA 150) 44) IKA-1 / Simsat-1
45) IKA-2 / Simsat-2 46) STS-101 / ISS-2A.2a 47) Eutelsat W4 48) Gorizont 33
49) TSX 5 50) Ekspress A3 51) FY-2 / Feng Yun 2B 52) Nadezhda 6
53) Tsinghua 1 54) SNAP 1 55) TDRS 8 56) Sirius 1 / SD-RADIO 1
57) Kosmos 2371 / Geizer 22L 58) Zvezda / ISS-1R 59) Echostar VI 60) MITA / MITA-O
61) CHAMP 62) Rubin / Bird-Rubin 63) Navstar 44 (USA 151) 64) Samba / Cluster II FM7
65) Salsa / Cluster II FM8 66) Mightysat 2.1 / Sindri 67) Picosat 7/Picosat 8 Tethered Picosat 68) DARPA Picosat 23 / MEMS 3/MEMS 
69) PAS 9 / PanAmSat 9 70) Progress M1-3 / ISS-1P 71) Rumba / Cluster II FM5 (Phoenix) 72) Tango / Cluster II FM8
73) Brasilsat B-4 74) Nilesat 102 75) ONYX 4 (USA 152) 76) DM-F3
77) Raduga 1-5 78) ZY-2 / Zi Yuan-2 79) Sirius 2 / SD-RADIO 2 80) Eutelsat W1
81) STS-106 / ISS-2A.2b 82) Astra 2B 83) GE 7 84) NOAA 16
85) Kosmos 2372 / Orlets-2 / Yenisey 86) Tiungsat-1 (MO-46) 87) MegSat-1 88) UniSat
89) SaudiSat 1A 90) SaudiSat 1B 91) Kosmos 2373 / Yantar-1KFT 92) AAP-1 / GE 1A
93) N-SAT-110 / Superbird 5 94) HETE-2 95) STS-92 / ISS-3A 96) Kosmos 2374 / Uragan 83L
97) Kosmos 2375 / Uragan 87L 98) Kosmos 2376 / Uragan 88L 99) Progress M-43 100) DSCS III B-11 (USA 153)
101) Thuraya 1 102) GE 6 103) Europe*Star F1 104) Beidou 1
105) Soyuz TM-31 / ISS-2R 106) Navstar 45 (USA 154) 107) PAS 1R / PanAmSat 1R 108) AMSAT-Oscar-40 (AO-40)
109) STRV-1c 110) STRV-1d 111) Progress M1-4 / ISS-2P 112) QuickBird 1
113) EO-1 / Earth Observing 1 114) SAC-C 115) Munin 116) Anik F-1
117) Sirius 3 / SD-RADIO 3 118) STS-97 / ISS-4A 119) ITS-P6 120) EROS A1
121) NRO "Great Bear" (USA 155) 122) Astra 2D 123) GE 8 / Aurora III 124) LDREX
125) Beidou 2 126) Gonets D1-7 127) Gonets D1-8 128) Gonets D1-9
129) Strela-3 130) Strela-3 131) Strela-3
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Spacecraft Entries
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DSCS III B-8  (USA 148)
Spacecraft:  Defence Satellite Communications System 3 (Being the 10th in the DSCS 3 FN series, its full name is likely to be DSCS 3 F10.)
Chronologies: 2000 payload #1 ; 2000-001A ; 5798th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 21 January 2000 at 1h03 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-36A, by an Atlas IIA (AC-138, IABS-7). 
Orbit: Geostationary over the Pacific.
Mission: DSCS 3 is a military communications spacecraft. This Lockheed Martin/Valley Forge DSCS III satellite (serial number B-8) is part of the US Air Force's Defense Satellite Communications System. With a solar power of 1,240 Watts, the jam-proof spacecraft has six "SHF" relaying channels in the frequency range of 50-85 MHz which can be received by an 84 centimeters dish. The craft is triaxially stabilized at about 0.1 deg in roll and pitch. Mass is about 900 kg dry.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419 & 495 ; Spacewarn No. 555 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-001A ;
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Galaxy 10R 
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #2 ; 2000-002A ; 5799th spacecraft
Type: Communications (DBS)
Sponsor: U.S. Panamsat
Launch: 25 January 2000 at 1h04 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 42L (V126). 
Orbit: Geostationary at 127° West longitude
Mission: Galaxy 10R is a communications spacecraft that carries 24 C-band and 24 Ku-band transponders to provide digital and video communications to nearly all of about 11,000 cable systems in North America. This Hughes HS-601HP, 2,137-kg (dry mass of 1,987 kg), 8.8-kW satellite supplements Panamsat's Galaxy cable TV distribution constellation, replacing Galaxy 10, lost on the first Delta 3 launch failure.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419 ; Spacewarn No. 555 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-002A ;
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Feng Huo 1 / Zhongxing 22
Spacecraft:  DFH-3
Chronologies: 2000 payload #3 ; 2000-003A ; 5800th spacecraft
Type: Communications (multi-service)
Sponsor: China Telecommunications Broadcast Satellite Corp
Launch: 25 January 2000 at 16h45 UTC, from Xichang Space Launch Center's LC-2, by a Chang Zheng 3A.
Orbit: Geosstationary at 98° East longitude
Mission: Zhongxing 22 is a DFH-3 communications spacecraft built by the China Academy of Space Technology. The Zhongxing series has provided domestic Chinese communications since 1988 for the China Telecommunications Broadcast Satellite Corp, a division of the Chinese ministry of Posts and  Telecommunications. It's not clear what the significance of '22' in Zhongxing-22's name is. It probably derived from the DFH-3 (3-axis stablized) design which was of similar mass (launch mass of ZX-22 is 2,300 kg). 
The launcher: The CZ-3A is a three-stage launch vehicle with a liquid hydrogen upper stage; this was its fourth flight, although the CZ3B (with 5 flights) is basically the same vehicle with strapon boosters.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419 & 420 ; Spacewarn No. 555 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-003A ;
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JAWSAT / Weber-OSCAR 39
Spacecraft:  P98-1 ; Joint Air Force Academy/Weber State Satellite
Chronologies: 2000 payload #4 ; 2000-004A ; 5801st spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force / Weber State University
Launch: 27 January 2000 at 3h03 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's CLF, by a Minotaur.
Orbit: circular at 773 km x 100.2° x 100.4 min
Mission: JAWSAT is a military minisatellite that that may carries a "High-Resolution Imaging System". It is a 64-kg spacecraft carrying a plasma experiment and a particle detector as well as a technology test. The Space Test Program P98-1 mission consists of a large collection of small satellites aboard the Minotaur launch. JAWSAT deployed four microsatellites: FalconSat, OCS, OPAL and ASUSat
The launcher: The satellite was launched by the first of 450 (350?) decommissioned/re-engineered Minuteman-2 rockets. It's the debut of the Orbital Sciences Minotaur, which uses Minuteman and Pegasus/Taurus stages. The Minotaur is the space launch vehicle for the USAF Orbital/Suborbital Program which uses refurbished hardware for small missions; USAF refer to it with the acronym OSPSLV (Orbital/Suborbital Program Space Launch Vehicle). It is also the first launch from the California Spaceport, a commercial pad on a leased site at Vandenberg Air Force Base. The CLF (Commercial Launch Facility) is near the SLC-6 complex on South Vandenberg. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419 ; Spacewarn No. 555 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-004A ; Weber State University's JAWSAT ; A Brief History of Amateur Satellites ;
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OCS / OCSE 
Spacecraft:  P98-1 ; Optical Calibration Sphere Experiment
Chronologies: 2000 payload #5 ; 2000-004B ; 5802nd spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force
Launch: 27 January 2000 at 3h03 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's CLF, by a Minotaur.
Orbit: circular at 773 km x 100.2° x 100.4 min
Decayed: 5 May 2001
Mission: OCS is a military microsatellite released from JAWSAT. It is a 3.5-meter diameter inflatable sphere built by L'Garde Inc. for calibrating the lasers at the AFRL Starfire Optical Range. Mass of OCSE plus container is 22 kg. Once inflated, the sphere's material becomes rigidized
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419 ; Spacewarn No. 555 & 569 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-004B ;
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OPAL / OPAL-OSCAR 38
Spacecraft:  P98-1 ; Orbiting Picosat Automated Launcher
Chronologies: 2000 payload #6 ; 2000-004C ; 5803rd spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: U.S. Stanford University
Launch: 27 January 2000 at 3h03 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's CLF, by a Minotaur.
Orbit: Circular at 773 km x 100.2° x 100.4 min
Mission: OPAL is a microsatellite for engineering tests of components, and was released from JAWSAT. In turn, it was also to deploy six student-engineered picosatellites as a feasibility test. The 13-kg spacecraft carries an acclerometer.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419 ; Spacewarn No. 555 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-004C ; Stanford University's OPAL ; A Brief History of Amateur Satellites ;
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FalconSat 1 
Spacecraft:  P98-1 ;
Chronologies: 2000 payload #7 ; 2000-0004D ; 5804th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: US Air Force Academy
Launch: 27 January 2000 at 3h03 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's CLF, by a Minotaur.
Orbit: Circular at 773 km x 100.2° x 100.4 min
Mission: FALCONSAT is a military microsatellite that was released from JAWSAT. It is reported to be a technology testing mission. This 15-kg satellite carries the CHAWS-LD (Charging Hazards and Wake Studies-Long Duration) experiment to measure spacecraft charging effects in LEO. It was developed and is operated by USAFA (the US Air Force Academy) and also provides USAFA cadets with space operations experience and training. The USAFA flew an earlier experiment, Falcon Gold, as an attached payload on a Centaur upper stage in 1997.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419 & 420 ; Spacewarn No. 555 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-004D ;
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ASUSAT 1 / Arizona State-OSCAR 37 
Spacecraft:  P98-1 ; Arizona State University SATellite
Chronologies: 2000 payload #8 ; 2000-004E ; 5805th spacecraft
Type: Earth observation and amateur radio
Sponsor: U.S. Arizona State University
Launch: 27 January 2000 at 3h03 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's CLF, by a Minotaur.
Orbit: Circular at 773 km x 100.2° x 100.4 min
Mission: ASUSat is amicrosatellite that was released from JAWSAT. This 5-kg student-engineered spacecraft carries components for engineering tests, with an Earth imager and an amateur radio transponder. The satellite failed after 15 hours on orbit because of power supply problems.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419 & 420 ; Spacewarn No. 555 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-004E ; NASA ASUSat ; A Brief History of Amateur Satellites ;
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Progress M1-1 
Spacecraft:  Progress 11F615A55 (7K-TGM) no. 250
Chronologies: 2000 payload #9 ; 2000-005A ; 5806th spacecraft
Type: Cargo delivery to Mir
Sponsor: Rosaviakosmos / Russian Space Agency
Launch: 1st February 2000 at 6h47 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz.
Orbit: Circular at ~350 km x 51.6°
Deorbit: 26 April 2000 at 19h27 UTC over Pacific.
Mission: Progress M-1 is a Russian automatic cargo carrier that docks with the Mir orbital space complex. It is equipped to raise the altitude of the station from 320 km to 400 km, and to repressurize it with 150 kg of nitrogen. (Currently, the pressure has degraded to 570 mm of Hg.) It also carried fuel, water, food and other provisions for the Soyuz TM-30 cosmonauts who are expected to arrive in late March 2000 to spend 7-10 weeks on board.
     This is the first Progress M1 enhanced cargo ferry originally developed for the International Space Station, a modification of the A55 variant (Progress M). This M1-1 was however assigned to Mir. It docks with the unoccupied Mir complex on 3 February 2000 at 8h02:20 UTC and began raising Mir's orbit on 5 February. It undocked from that port on 26 April 2000 at 16h33 UTC and was deorbited over the Pacific.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 420 & 424 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-005A ;
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Kosmos 2369 
Spacecraft:  Tselina-2
Chronologies: 2000 payload #10 ; 2000-006A ; 5807th spacecraft
Type: Electronic intelligence
Sponsor: Russian Defense ministry
Launch: 3 February 2000 at 9h26 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-45, by a J-1/Zenit-2.
Orbit: 845 km x 853 km x 71.0°
Mission: Kosmos-2369 is a Tselina-2 signals intelligence vehicle built by KB Yuzhnoe.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 420 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-006A ;
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Hispasat 1C 
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2000 payload #11 ; 2000-007A ; 5808th spacecraft
Type: Communications (multi-service)
Sponsor: Spain
Launch: 3 February 2000 at 23h30 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-36, by an Atlas IIAS. 
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: HispaSat 1C is a Spanish communications spacecraft that carries 24 transponders in Ku-band to provide Spanish language voice and video communications to countries on either side of the Atlantic. The 3,100-kg, 6,000-Watt spacecraft is an Alcatel/Cannes Spacebus 3000 and joins the Spanish domestic satcom fleet.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 420 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-007A ;
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Picosat 21 / MEMS 1
Spacecraft: P98-1 ; Micro Electro-mechanical Systems
Chronologies: 2000 payload #12 ; 2000-004H ; 5809th spacecraft
Type: Technology (communications)
Sponsor: U.S. DARPA/Aerospace Corp.
Launch: Deployed from OPAL on 7 February 2000 at 334 UTC.
(OPAL was launched on 27 January 2000 at 3h03 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's CLF, by a Minotaur).
Orbit: 750 km x 805 km x 100.2° x 100.4 min
Mission: A dual 0.25-kg MEMS picosatellites carrying an intersatellite communications experiment and are connected by a 30-meter tether. These Tethered Picosats hectogram satellites were built mostly by engineering students at Santa Clara University in California, from off-the-shelf components and miniature batteries.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419& 420 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-004H ;
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Picosat 23 / MEMS 2
Spacecraft:  P98-1 ; Micro Electro-mechanical Systems
Chronologies: 2000 payload #13 ; 2000-004H ; 5810th spacecraft
Type: Technology (communications)
Sponsor: U.S. DARPA/Aerospace Corp.
Launch: Deployed from OPAL on 7 February 2000 at 334 UTC
(that was launched on 27 January 2000 at 3h03 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's CLF, by a Minotaur).
Orbit: 750 km x 805 km x 100.2° x 100.4 min
Mission: A dual 0.25-kg MEMS picosatellites carrying an intersatellite communications experiment and are connected by a 30-meter tether. These Tethered Picosats hectogram satellites were built mostly by engineering students at Santa Clara University in California, from off-the-shelf components and miniature batteries.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419 & 420 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-004H ;
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Globalstar 60
Spacecraft:  Globalstar M060
Chronologies: 2000 payload #14 ; 2000-008A ; 5811th spacecraft
Type: Communications (phone)
Sponsor: Loral's Globalstar
Launch: 8 February 2000 at 21h24 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-17, by a Delta 7420.
Orbit: 912 km x 932 km x 52.0° 
Mission: Thirtieth (and last) group of four Globalstars spacecrafts that completes the constellation which already had the planned 48 satellites. With the addition of these four, any members of the 52 member fleet may be held in reserve. The fleet enables relay of data and voice communications from/to mobile or remote telephones located almost anywhere in the world.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 420  & 421 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-008A
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Globalstar 62
Spacecraft:  Globalstar M062
Chronologies: 2000 payload #15 ; 2000-008B ; 5812th spacecraft
Type: Communications (phone)
Sponsor: Loral's Globalstar
Launch: 8 February 2000 at 21h24 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-17, by a Delta 7420.
Orbit: 912 km x 932 km x 52.0°
Mission: Thirtieth (and last) group of four Globalstars spacecrafts that completes the constellation which already had the planned 48 satellites. With the addition of these four, any members of the 52 member fleet may be held in reserve. The fleet enables relay of data and voice communications from/to mobile or remote telephones located almost anywhere in the world.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 420 & 421 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-008B ;
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Globalstar 63
Spacecraft:  Globalstar M063
Chronologies: 2000 payload #16 ; 2000-008C ; 5813th spacecraft
Type: Communications (phone)
Sponsor: Loral's Globalstar
Launch: 8 February 2000 at 21h24 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-17, by a Delta 7420.
Orbit: 912 km x 932 km x 52.0°
Mission: Thirtieth (and last) group of four Globalstars spacecrafts that completes the constellation which already had the planned 48 satellites. With the addition of these four, any members of the 52 member fleet may be held in reserve. The fleet enables relay of data and voice communications from/to mobile or remote telephones located almost anywhere in the world.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 420 & 421 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-008C ;
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Globalstar 64
Spacecraft:  Globalstar M064
Chronologies: 2000 payload #17 ; 2000-008D ; 5814th spacecraft
Type: Communications (phone)
Sponsor: Loral's Globalstar
Launch: 8 February 2000 at 21h24 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-17, by a Delta 7420.
Orbit: 912 km x 932 km x 52.0°
Mission: Thirtieth (and last) group of four Globalstars spacecrafts that completes the constellation which already had the planned 48 satellites. With the addition of these four, any members of the 52 member fleet may be held in reserve. The fleet enables relay of data and voice communications from/to mobile or remote telephones located almost anywhere in the world.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 420 & 421 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-008D ;

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IRDT
Spacecraft:  Inflatable Reentry and Descent Technology
Chronologies: 2000 payload #18 ; 2000-009A ; 5815th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: ESA, German DASA and the Russian Lavochkin company
Launch: 8 February 2000 at 23h20 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by an A-2/Soyuz/Fregat (11A511U).
Orbit: 581 km x 606 km x 64.9° x 96.6 min
Landed: 14 February 2000
Mission: IRDT, built by DASA-Bremen and Lavochkin, weights 110 kg and has a shield of 0.8 meters in size packed, inflating to 3.6-meter diameter on use. It deployed inflatable heat shields for reentry. According to the ESA web site they landed in Russia 8 hours after launch with an impact velocity of about 47 kph. The separate IRDT demonstrator was found and survived reentry well.
The launcher: The first test flight of the Soyuz-Fregat launch vehicle appears to have been a success. The Fregat upper stage is derived from Lavochkin's Fobos/Mars-96 ADU propulsion unit. It uses the same liquid engine as Rokot's Briz upper stage.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 420 & 421 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-009A ;
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Gruzovoy Maket Dummy satellite
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #19 ; 2000-009B ; 5816th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 8 February 2000 at 23h20 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by an A-2/Soyuz/Fregat.
Orbit: 581 km x 606 km x 64.8°
Mission: A 1-tonne dummy mass.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 420 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-009B ;
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Fregat
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #20 ; 2000-009C ; 5817th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 8 February 2000 at 23h20 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by an A-2/Soyuz/Fregat.
Orbit:
Mission: In Russia, the search is still going on for the Fregat stage.  The shield deployed to 2.5m diameter on reentry, but failed to extend to its 4-meter drag chute mode during final descent. Fregat's shield was actually 14-meters in diameter at full extent.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 420 & 421 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-009C ;
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Astro E
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #21 ; 2000 1st loss ; 5818th spacecraft
Type: Astronomy
Sponsor: Japan's ISAS
Launch: 10 February 2000 at 1h30 UTC, from Kagoshima Space Center's Mu, by a M-V (M-V-4).
Orbit: n/a
Decayed The ASTRO-E X-ray astronomy spacecraft may have reentered on the first orbit at around 2h30-3h00 UTC somewhere between East Africa and Tibet or western China (depending on the altitude at injection).
Mission: During the launch, the first stage of the M-V launch vehicle went off course. An anomalous vibration was detected 25 seconds after launch. At 41 seconds, ceramic heat shields in the first stage nozzle apparently broke and fell off, and thrust vector control on the nozzle was lost. Although the upper stages were able to fire and make some correction to the trajectory, ASTRO-E ended up with a perigee of only 80 km and an apogee of 410 km. It may have reentered on the first orbit.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 421 ;
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JAK Artemis Picosat
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #22 ; 2000-004L ; 5819th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force/Santa Clara University
Launch: Deployed on 11 February 2000 at 5h10 UTC fron OPAL
(that was launched on 27 January 2000 at 3h03 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's CLF, by a Minotaur). 
Orbit: 750 km x 805 km x 100.2° x 100.4 min
Mission: The Artemis team of women undergrads at Santa Clara University has three picosatellites aboard the OPAL deployer. They are called JAK, Thelma, and Louise. (JAK is the initials of the infant son of Artemis' advisor). JAK has a mass of about 0.2 kg, the other two around 0.5 kg. Size around 0.1-0.2-meter each. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419, 420 & 421 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-004L ;
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STENSAT
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #23 ; 2000-004M ; 5820th spacecraft
Type: Communications (radio-amateur)
Sponsor: AMSAT-NA
Launch: Deployed on 11 February 2000 at 5h10 UTC fron OPAL
(that was launched on 27 January 2000 at 3h03 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's CLF, by a Minotaur). 
Orbit: 750 km x 805 km x 100.2° x 100.4 min
Mission: The 0.5 kg STENSAT, built by an AMSAT-NA group, carries an amateur radio transponder.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419 & 421 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-004M ; A Brief History of Amateur Satellites ;
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STS-99 - SRL-3
Spacecraft:  Space Shutle #97 ; Endeavour (14th flight) / Space Radar Lab 3 /
Chronologies: 2000 payload #24 ; 2000-010A ; 5821st spacecraft
Type: Piloted spaceflight (Earth observations)
Sponsor: NASA, NIMA, DLR and ASI.
Launch: 11 February 2000 at 17h43 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit: 224 km x 242 km x 57° x 89.2 min
Recovery: 22 February 2000 at 23h22 UTC on Kennedy Space Center's runway 33.
Mission: STS-99 is a joint mapping mission by NASA and the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA), utilizing the 13,600 kg Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) radars. STS-99 mapped the land surface of the Earth between latitudes 60° North and 54° South to obtain a 3-D map of about 70% global terrain. Sponsors of the mission are NIMA (the National Imagery and Mapping Agency), NASA, DLR (Germany) and ASI (Italy); the mission is managed by JPL. (Some of the NIMA data will remain secret for use by the U.S. Dept. of Defense.)
     Mounted on the pallet and the two ATS devices is the large imaging radar payload consisting of the SIR-C C-band/L-band radars and the international X-SAR X-band radar, as well as the ADAM mast which extends to 60-meter length carrying an 360 kg, 8-meter long outboard radar for interferometric imaging. The outboard mast is a new development, the rest of the payload is similar to the configuration flown on SRL-1 and SRL-2 in 1994 (STS-59 and STS-68).
   On 12 February 2000 at 23h27 UTC, the 61-meter SRTM mast was deployed successfully. A failed thruster on the end of the mast concerned managers but did not affect the mission significantly. After some problems stowing the mast on 21 February, Endeavour returned on 22 February. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419 & 421 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-010A ;
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Garuda 1 (ACES)
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #25 ; 2000-011A ; 5822nd spacecraft
Type: Communicaions (phone)
Sponsor: ACES consortium (which involves PSN of Indonesia, PLDT of the Phillipines, Lockheed Martin, and the Thai company Jasmine).
Launch: 12 February 2000 at 9h10 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81L, by a D-1-e/Proton/DM-3.
Orbit: Geostationary over Indonesia
Mission: Garuda 1 is an Indonesian communications satellite. The 4- tonne spacecraft relays in L-band mobile telephone communications in Asia-Pacific region. It is the first of the ACeS (Asia Cellular Satellite) constellation, to be followed by Garuda 2 and others. The satellite is a Lockheed Martin A2100AXX and has two large 12-meter diameter L-band antennas for cellphone relay.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 421 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-011A ;
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Thelma Artemis Picosat (Thunder)
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #26 ; 2000-004J ; 5823rd spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force/Santa Clara University
Launch: Deployed from OPAL on 12 February 2000 at 13h43 UTC.
(OPAL was launched on 27 January 2000 at 3h03 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's CLF, by a Minotaur).
Orbit: 750 km x 805 km x 100.2° x 100.4 min
Mission: The Artemis team of women undergrads at Santa Clara University has three picosatellites aboard the OPAL deployer. They are called JAK, Thelma, and Louise. Unfortunately no data was received from the picosats.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419, 420 & 421 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-004J ;
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Louise Artemis Picosat (Lightnin)
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #27 ; 2000-004K ; 5824th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force/Santa Clara University
Launch: Deployed from OPAL on 12 February 2000 at 13h43 UTC.
(OPAL was launched on 27 January 2000 at 3h03 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's CLF, by a Minotaur).
Orbit: 750 km x 805 km x 100.2° x 100.4 min
Mission: The Artemis team of women undergrads at Santa Clara University has three picosatellites aboard the OPAL deployer. They are called JAK, Thelma and Louise. Unfortunately no data was received from the picosats.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 419, 420 & 421 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-004K ;
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Superbird 4
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #28 ; 2000-012A ; 5825th spacecraft
Type: Communications (multi-service)
Sponsor: Japan's Space Communications Corp
Launch: 18 February 2000 at 1h04 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 44LP (V127). 
Orbit: Geostationary at 162° East longitude
Mission: Superbird 4 is a Japanese communications spacecraft that carries 23 Ku-band (80 W) and six Ka-band (50 W) transponders to provide business communications to Japan and Asia-Pacific. The 4.1-tonne spacecraft is a Hughes HS-601HP satellite with a masse of 1,657 kg dry.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 421 ; Spacewarn No. 556 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-012A ;
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Ekspress A2
Spacecraft: Ekspress A No. 2
Chronologies: 2000 payload #29 ; 2000-013A ; 5826th spacecraft
Type: Communications (multi-service)
Sponsor: Russia's GO Kosmicheskaya Svyaz
Launch: 12 March 2000 at 4h07 UTC, from the Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a D-1-e/Proton/DM-2M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 80° East longitude.
Mission: Express A2 is a 2,600-kg Russian communications spacecraft that carries 12 transponders in C-band and five in Ku-band to provide voice, data, and video communications in Russia, supplementing the existing fleet of seven Gorizonts, two Expresses and an EKRAN-M. This second Ekspress A satellite was assigned to the Ekspress 6A. The first Ekspress A was lost in a launch failure last year. The Ekspress A is built by NPO PM, with a communications payload from Alcatel. They are scheduled to replace the aging Gorizont fleet.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 422 ; Spacewarn No. 557 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-013A ;
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MTI
Spacecraft:  P97-3 ; Multispectral Thermal Imager
Chronologies: 2000 payload #30 ; 2000-014A ; 5827th spacecraft
Type: Earth imaging
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nonproliferation and National Security
Launch: 12 March 2000 at 9h23 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's LC-576E, by a Taurus 1110.
Orbit: 577 km x 613 km x 97.4° x 96.6 min
Mission: MTI is a quasi-military reconnaissance spacecraft cosponsored by the Deparment of Energy, Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. This USAF Space Test Program mission P97-3 is to test out a multispectral imager for treaty monitoring applications. It is a joint mission of Sandia Labs and Los Alamos, together with the Savannah River Technology Center. The 587-kg spacecraft carries visible and infrared sensors in 15 spectral bands to spot cooling ponds adjacent to nuclear reactors and dust content associated with uranium ore processing. The collected data will also have spin-off benefits to civilian research involving atmospheric ozone, water vapor and such. 
The launcher: Orbital Sciences' Taurus 1110 rocket has a 63-inch fairing and a Peacekeeper first stage.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 422 & 423 ; Spacewarn No. 557 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-014A ; MTI Project ;
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ICO F-1
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #31 ; 2000 2nd loss ; 5828th spacecraft
Type: Communications
Sponsor: ICO Global Communications
Launch: 12 March 2000 at 14h49 UTC, from Odyssey platform, by a Zenit-3SL.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: The first ICO satellite was lost when its Zenit-3SL launch vehicle failed. ICO F-1 was a 2,750 kg Hughes HS-601M satellite and would have entered a 10,300 km x 45 deg circular orbit.  It carried multiple spot beams for mobile
communications.
Launch: The Zenit-3SL vehicle took of from Boeing Sea Launch's Odyssey platform in the Pacific at 154° West and 0° North. Its second stage shut down prematurely due to a valve commanding mistake in the prelaunch sequence, and the satellite fell in the South Pacific, possibly south of Pitcairn. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 422 ;
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Dumsat / Fregat RB/Cluster 2
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #32 ; 2000-015A ; 5829th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 20 March 2000 at 18h28 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by an A-2/Soyuz/Fregat.
Orbit: 245 km x 18,019 km x 64.6° x 320 min
Mission: Fregat RB/Cluster 2 is a Russian experimental upper stage rocket body (Fregat) and a dummy payload (Cluster 2) to simulate the launch of ESA's Cluster mission. The Fregat upper stage placed a dummy satellite, Dumsat, into orbit. The second test launch of the Soyuz-Fregat vehicle succeeded; the separation of the rocket body and the dummy was not planned, but the separation was simulated successfully. Built by Aerospatiale Matra, Dumsat is a mass model of a pair of Cluster II scientific satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 422 ; Spacewarn No. 557 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-015A ;
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Asiastar
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #33 ; 2000-016A ; 5830th spacecraft
Type: Communications (radio broadcasting)
Families:
Sponsor: Worldspace
Launch: 21 March 2000 at 23h28 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 (Ariane 505, V128).
Orbit: Geostationary at 105° East longitude
Mission: Worldspace's second digital radio satellite relayes digital radio broadcasts to East Asia. It joins Afristar in orbit with a mission of providing radio broadcasting to and by communities in the developing world. The 2,777 kg, 5.6 kW, triaxially stabilized spacecraft is a Matra Marconi Space Eurostar 2000+ spacecraft. 
Note: The first fully commercial Ariane 5 flight. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 422 ; Spacewarn No. 557 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-016A ;
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Insat 3B
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #34 ; 2000-016B ; 5831st spacecraft
Type: Communications (multi-service)
Sponsor: ISRO / Indian Space Research Organization,
Launch: 21 March 2000 at 23h28 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 (Ariane 505, V128).
Orbit: Geostationary at 83° East longitude
Mission: Insat 3B is an Indian communications spacecraft that carries 12 Ext-C-band (15 W) and three Ku-band (55 W) transponders for rural educational and health service programs receivable by the thousands of VSATs (Very Small Aperture Terminals) in India, and a single S-band mobile satellite service (MSS) transponder for relaying voice, data, and facsimilies from/to mobile telephones with suit case sized "terminals". It carries a pure telecom payload, unlike earlier Insats which also had weather instruments. Insat 3B was accelerated to replace the lost Insat 2D. The 2,070 kg (with fuel), 1.7 kW, triaxially stabilized spacecraft was built by ISRO and has a dry mass of 970 kg.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 422 ; Spacewarn No. 557 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-016B ;
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IMAGE
Spacecraft:  Imager for Magnetopause to Aurora Global Exploration
Chronologies: 2000 payload #35 ; 2000-017A ; 5832nd spacecraft
Type: Earth's upper atmosphère studies
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 25 March 2000 at 20h34 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-2W, by a Delta 7326.
Orbit: 987 km x 45 993 km x 89.9°
Mission: IMAGE is a magnetospheric science spacecraft, a MIDEX (mid-sized Explorer mission) and was developed by NASA-Goddard and the SWRI (Southwest Research Institute of San Antonio, Texas). It carries a set of neutral atom imagers and ultraviolet imagers and antennae to study radio wavelength emissions from the magnetospheric plasma. The RPI radio plasma imager has four long wire antennae which will be deployed to a span of half a kilometer. The 494 kg, 250 W, spin-stabilized (2 min period) octagonal (2.25 meters wide and 1.52 meters high) spacecraft is a Lockheed Martin LM100. 
The launcher: IMAGE was launched by a Delta 7326 which uses three strapon GEM-40 boosters, a long tank Delta II Thor first stage, a Delta II second stage with an Aerojet AJ-10-118K engine and a Thiokol Star 37FM third stage solid motor.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 422 ; Spacewarn No. 558 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-017A ;
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Soyuz TM-30
Spacecraft:  Soyuz 11F732 (7K-STM) no. 204
Chronologies: 2000 payload #36 ; 2000-018A ; 5833rd spacecraft
Type: Piloted spaceflight (to Mir space station)
Sponsor: Rosaviakosmos / Russian Space Agency
Launch: 4 April 2000 at 5h01 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz-U (11A511U).
Orbit: 329 km x 333 km x 51.6°
Recovered: 16 June 2000 at 0h44 UTC near Arkalyk, Kazakstan.
Mission: Soyuz-TM-30 transports two cosmonauts for a 45-day stay in Mir space station, the EO-28 Mir crew of commander Sergey Zalyotin and flight engineer Aleksandr Kaleri. They repairs the 14-year-old station, especially the recent problems of pressure leak and a dysfunctional orientation of a solar panel.  Part of the EO-28 mission is financed by the private MirCorp company. 
     This Soyuz is the first in the "200" series of Soyuz TM vehicles to fly and that were originally built to support the International Space Station.  They are externally similar to the standard Soyuz TM.
     Soyuz TM-30 docks with Mir's forward (-X) port on 6 April 2000 at 6h31 UTC. Zalyotin and Kaleri reactivated Mir and are settle in for a stay of uncertain duration (it was not clear how long the EO-28 crew will stay aboard). Finally, the spacecrfat landed on 16 June 2000. Zalyotin and Kaleri closed the hatch to Mir on 15 June at 18h17 UTC and undocked at 15h21;24 UTC on 16 June. This concludes the 15-year operation of Mir space complex.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 423, 424, 429 & 430 ; Spacewarn No. 555 & 558 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-018A ;
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Sesat
Spacecraft:  Siberia-Europe Satellite
Chronologies: 2000 payload #37 ; 2000-019A ; 5834th spacecraft
Type: Communications (multi-service)
Sponsor: Eutelsat
Launch: 17 April 2000 at 21h06 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-200L, by a D-1-e/Proton-K.
Orbit: Geostationary at 48° East longitude.
Mission: SESAT is an European-Russian communications spacecraft  that provides high-speed internet access, high-volume data transmission, video broadcasting to support corporate networks, and messaging and positioning services to mobile users through its 18 Ku-band transponders. The 2,400-kg, 5.6-kW spacecraft is an MSS-2500-GSO (Gals/Ekspress) comsat built by NPO PM of Krasnoyarsk, with an Alcatel Espace telecoms payload with 18 Ku-band transponders. The combination of a Russian-built spacecraft bus and European communications payload follows the trend set by the similar Ekspress A series.
Notes: Eutelsat grew out of the European Communication Satellites (ECS) launched starting in 1983; they have since developed their Hot Bird fleet of European television broadcast satellites, but the venture into broadcasting to Siberia is a new step for them.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 424 ; Spacewarn No. 558 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-019A ;
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Galaxy IVR
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #38 ; 2000-020A ; 5835th spacecraft
Type: Communications (multi-service)
Sponsor: PanAmSAT Corporation
Launch: 19 April 2000 at 0h29 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 42L (V129).
Orbit: Geostationary at 99° West longitude.
Mission: Galaxy 4R is a communications spacecraft that transmits television and internet signals from/to all parts of the United States, through its 24 C-band and 24 Ku-band transponders. The 2,216-kg, 8.8-kW spacecraft is a Hughes HS-601HP model with a dry mass of 1,895 kg. The Galaxy satellites provide US domestic telecom services; the original Galaxy IVH failed in May 1998, putting pagers out of action across the USA. Over fifty HS-601 class satellites have now been launched, and most are still operating.
The launcher: The Ariane 42L vehicle has two strap-on liquid boosters; the flight was the 51st launch of the uprated H10-3 high energy upper stage and the 124th launch of the three-stage Ariane 1/2/3/4 class vehicle.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 424 ; Spacewarn No. 558 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-020A ;
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Progress M1-2
Spacecraft:  Progress 11F615A55 (7K-TGM) No. 252
Chronologies: 2000 payload #39 ; 2000-021A ; 5836th spacecraft
Type: Cargo delivery to Mir
Sponsor: Rosaviakosmos / Russian Space Agency
Launch: 29 April 2000 at 20h08 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Circular at ~350 km x 51.6°
Deorbit: 15 October 2000
Mission: Progress M1-2 is an automatic cargo ship that delivers supplies to Mir space station. It is the second of the new model (Progress M1) which will be a main carrier of cargo to the International Space Station. Its 2,037 kg payload contains an air-oxygen mixture, fuel (1,800 kg) to boost Mir to a higher orbit and food and supplies for the two cosmonauts who are already in Mir doing repair jobs. Progress M1-2 docked with the rear Kvant port on 27 April 2000 at 21h28 UTC. Mir's orbit was raised on 29 April in the first of a series of three burns. Progress M1-2 undocked from Mir on 15 October 2000 and was deorbited over the Pacific later the same day.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 424 & 437 ; Spacewarn No. 558 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-021A ;
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GOES 11
Spacecraft:  GOES L / Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite
Chronologies: 2000 payload #40 ; 2000-022A ; 5837th spacecraft
Type: Meteorology
Sponsor: NOAA
Launch: 3 May 2000 at 7h07 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-36A, by an Atlas IIA (AC-137).
Orbit: Geostationary at 104° West longitude
Mission: GOES L is a US civilian weather satellite, renamed GOES 11 after it reaches geostationary orbit. It was built by SS/Loral and is based on the FS-1300 bus. It has one solar panel array and a counter-boom with a solar sail. As well as an imaging radiometer, the satellite carries an X-ray detector to monitor solar activity. The instruments onboard the 2,105 kg (with fuel) spacecraft are almost identical to the ones onboard GOES 8, GOES 9 and GOES 10. The spacecraft has now been parked about halfway between GOES 8 (75° W) and GOES 10 (135° W). (GOES 9, which had malfunctioned in 1998, is passively stored in orbit to replace any GOES that may fail.)
     The major ones are the Imager, the Sounder and the SEM package. The Imager scans East-West with a north-south swath of eight km. The Sounder has 19 discrete wavelength channels; it is called a "sounder" only because the progressive increase in the atmospheric opacity from channel to channel enables sampling the atmosphere as those many layers for temperature, moisture content and ozone distribution. The spacecraft also carries a transponder for search and recovery activities.
Notes: It is the first GOES launch on the Atlas II class vehicle, the old Atlas I has now been phased out.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 425 ; Spacewarn No. 555 & 559 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-022A ;
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Kosmos 2370
Spacecraft:  Yantar-4KS1 / 17F117 Neman-class
Chronologies: 2000 payload #41 ; 2000-023A ; 5838th spacecraft 
Type: Reconnaissance
Sponsor: Russian Defense ministry
Launch: 3 May 2000 at 13h25 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz-U.
Orbit: 240 km x 300 km x 64,8°
Recovered?: 4 May 2001
Mission: Cosmos 2370 is a Russian military reconnaissance spacecraft with data arriving in digital form. It is the 22nd member of the 17F117 Neman-class fleet of spy satellites. an advanced imaging reconnaissance satellite based on the Yantar' bus and is a descendant of the Yantar'-4KS1 design. The Neman relays digital imagery to earth via geostationary comsats and is the Russian equivalent of the KH-11. It  was first launched in February 1986 (Kosmos 1731). The last Neman satellite, Kosmos 2359, reentered in July 1999 after on year in orbit.
     According to Moscow's Kommersant newspaper, until this launch, Russia has remained without photo-reconnaissance resources for five months, after the failure of the Kobalt (Kosmos 2365) spacecraft in December 1999. The imaging will be done mainly over Chechnya, since there is no functional relaying resource in geosynchronous orbit (via the now dysfunctional Geyzer spacecraft) for images from elsewhere on the globe.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 425 & 426 ; Spacewarn No. 559 & 571 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-023A ;
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DSP 20 (USA 149)
Spacecraft:  Defense Support Program
Chronologies: 2000 payload #42 ; 2000-024A ; 5839th spacecraft
Type: Missile early warning
Families: 20th DSP (7th Phase 3)
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force

Source: A. Parsch
Launch: 8 May 2000 at 16h01 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-40, by a Titan 4B (4B-29, IUS-22).
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: DSP-20 is the 20th in the DSP fleet and is reported to carry 6,000 lead sulfide infra-red sensors to detect rocket launches and nuclear explosions from horizon to horizon. The TRW-built, 2.5-tonne, 680-Watts spacecraft is the first fully successful Titan 4 mission from Cape Canaveral in four tries, a relief for Lockheed Martin Astronautics.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 425 ; Spacewarn No. 559 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-024A ;
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Navstar 43 (USA 150)
Spacecraft:  Navstar SVN 51 / GPS 2R-4
Chronologies: 2000 payload #43 ; 2000-025A ; 5840th spacecraft
Type: Navigation
Families: 47th Navstar (4th second-generation replacement)
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Source: A. Parsch
Launch: 11 May 2000 at 1h48 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-17A, by a Delta 7925.
Orbit: Circulat at 20 200 km x 55° x 712 min
Mission: Navstar 47 is the latest addition to the American GPS fleet of navigation satellites. The 24-spacecraft fleet was completed in 1994, but this Navstar will replace a failing member. It is another Navstar Block IIR GPS navigation satellite which are built by Lockheed Martin/Sunnyvale and based on the Series 4000 comsat bus. Also known as PRN20 (in GPS parlance), it replaces the failing PRN14 in Slot E-1.
Notes:      GPS navigational location has until recently been at 100 meter accuracy for civilian use signals, and at 20 meter accuracy for military use signals. As of 1st May 2000, the DoD has voided the intentional degradation of the accuracy for civilian use, and made it on a par with the military accuracy. But it retains the prerogative to degrade the accuracy at selected locations when necessary.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 425 ; Spacewarn No. 559 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-025A ;
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IKA-1 / Simsat-1
Spacecraft:  EPN 813IP/003
Chronologies: 2000 payload #44 ; 2000-026A ; 5841st spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 16 May 2000 at 8h28 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133, by a Rokot.
Orbit: 543 km x 558 km x 86.3° x 95.6 min
Mission: Simsat 1 and Simsat 2, which were launched by the new Russian rocket named Rokot, are 660-kdummies simulating future commercial launches. They were placed in orbits similar to the parking orbit that was used for the Iridium program.
Notes: On 24 December 1999, the Rokot launch vehicle and its satellite were victim of an accident at Plesetsk. The launcher was not damaged in the accident, neither was the payload. Only the fairing was ejected and written off. Krunichev was therefore able to launch the vehicle in May with two dummy satellites.
The launcher: Rokot is the two-stage UR-100N ICBM (known as SS-19 in NATO), but augmented by the addition of a Bris-Km booster stage and capable of launching two-tonne satellites into low Earth orbits inexpensively. (Previous launches of the SS-19 from a silo had engendered unacceptable acoustic impact on the payload.)
     Rokot (`roar' or `rumble') is called Rockot by its Western marketers (EUROCKOT Launch Services GmbH), a joint venture between Krunichev and DaimlerChrysler Aerospace. This was its first flight from Plesetsk, using a launch pad originally used for Kosmos rockets. The launch vehicle is a two-stage modified UR-100NUTTKh ICBM, developed by Krunichev.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 416, 418 & 426 ; Spacewarn No. 559 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-026A ;
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IKA-2 / Simsat-2
Spacecraft:  EPN 813IP/007
Chronologies: 2000 payload #45 ; 2000-026B ; 5842nd spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 16 May 2000 at 8h28 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133, by a Rokot.
Orbit: 520 km x 544 km x 86.4
Mission: Simsat 1 and Simsat 2, which were launched by the new Russian rocket named Rokot, are 660-kdummies simulating future commercial launches. They were placed in orbits similar to the parking orbit that was used for the defunct Iridium program.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 426 ; Spacewarn No. 559 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-026B ;
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STS-101 / ISS-2A.2a
Spacecraft:  Space Shutle #98 ; Atlantis (21st flight)
Chronologies: 2000 payload #46 ; 2000-027A ; 5843rd spacecraft
Type: Piloted spaceflight (to the International Space Station)
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 19 May 2000 at 10h11 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle. 
Orbit: Circular at ~400 km x 51.6°
Mission: STS 101 main mission was to carry out repairs and upgrades to the International Space Station (ISS): to replace four of the six solar charged batteries on the Zarya module, to stabilize a wobbly 3-meter construction crane that was installed during an earlier shuttle mission, to complete the installation of a partially installed Russian 15-meter crane on the Zarya module, to replace a faulty communications antenna, to boost by 32 km the altitude of the Station (which has been loosing 2.4 km/week), to deliver a tonne of food, fuel and supplies to the station, and prepare the station for the arrival of the Russian service module (Zvezda) in mid-July. All objectives were implemented.
The launcher: This was the first launch with the new Orbiter's electronic cockpit displays and other upgrades, and it seems to have gone almost flawlessly.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 422 & 426 ; Spacewarn No. 559 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-027A ;
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Eutelsat W4
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #47 ; 2000-028A ; 5844th spacecraft
Type: Communications (multi-service)
Sponsor: Eutelsat / European Telecommunications Satellite Organization
Launch: 24 May 2000 at 23h10 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-36B, by an Atlas IIIA (AC-201).
Orbit: Geostationary at 36° East longitude
Mission: Eutelsat W4 is a communications spacecraft carries 31 channels in the Ku-BSS band to provide voice and video communications to eastern African countries, eastern European countries and Russia. The 1,380-kg (dry mass), 6-kW spacecraft is an Alcatel Spacebus 3000B2 comsat. This is the third of the high power Eutelsat W series to be launched: the W1 was destroyed in a ground acciden, as Eutelsat W2 (at 16° East) and Eutelsat W3 (at 7° East) are the two other operational Eutelsats. 
The launcher: This is the first launch of the Lockheed Martin Astronautics' Atlas IIIA. All previous Atlas models used a MA-5A sustainer with one nozzle and MA-5A booster with two nozzles, one on either side of the sustainer. The Atlas III first stage is a major redesign for the vehicle, replacing the venerable MA-5 engine system with an Energomash RD-180. The RD-180 is a LOX/kerosene engine with 412 kN thrust and two combustion chambers. The new much simpler design has no separating booster package. It retains the 3.05-meter diameter core tank size and is stretched to a length of 29 meters.
     The Atlas IIIA second stage is the Centaur IIIA, or Single Engine Centaur. All previous Centaur stages have used a pair of Pratt and Whitney RL-10 LOX/LH2 engines, and the new design is similar in size and shape to its twin-engine Centaur IIA predecessor. The Centaur IIIA uses an RL-10A-4-1B engine which is basically the same as that used on Centaur IIA.
     The irony of the US's first intercontinental missile being reequipped with Russian engines has drawn a lot of comment. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 427 & 490 ; Spacewarn No. 559 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-028A ;
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Gorizont 33
Spacecraft:  Gorizont No. 45L
Chronologies: 2000 payload #48 ; 2000-029A ; 5845th spacecraft
Type: Communications (multi-service)
Sponsor: Russia's GP Kosmicheskaya Svyaz
Launch: 6 June 2000 at 2h59 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81P, by a D-1-e/Proton/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: Gorizont 33 ("Horizon") is a Russian communications  dual-use spacecraft to provide improved television coverage in eastern parts of Russian and to further military communications. It carries 6 C-band transponders as well as one L-band and one Ku-band transponder. This Gorizont is the final launch of this series of television broadcasting satellite, as the new Ekspress satellites are replacing the system. The satellites are built by NPO Prikladnoi Mekhaniki of Zheleznogorsk for GP Kosmicheskaya Svyaz, the Russian comsat operator.
The launcher: This the first successful Proton/Briz-M launch; earlier 4-stage Proton vehicles used the Energiya Blok-DM family of stages. The new stage is built by Krunichev, who also build the Proton-K core vehicle. A first flight of Proton/Briz-M failed early in launch last year, before the Briz-M got a chance to ignite. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 428 ; Spacewarn No. 560 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-029A ;
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TSX 5
Spacecraft:  P95-2 / TSX / Tri-Service Experiments
Chronologies: 2000 payload #49 ; 2000-030A ; 5846th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: United States' Ballistic Missile Defense Organization, the UK Ministry of Defense's DERA organization and the AFRL (USAF Research Lab).
Launch: 7 June 2000 at 13h19 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base RW-30/22, by a Pegasus XL
Orbit: 403 km x 1,704 km x 69.0° x 106 min
Mission: TSX 5 is a military spacecraft that carries a compact environmental anomaly sensor (CEASE) to probe the near-spacecraft environment. Also on board are the STRV-2 and MWIR instruments: the former to experiment with laser communications between spacecraft and the latter to provide infrared images of flying aircraft.
    TSX-5's main section is the STRV-2 experiment module, which is sponsored by the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization in collaboration with the UK Ministry of Defense's DERA organization at Farnborough, to test infrared sensors and a laser communications payload. STRV-2 attempts to take infrared images of UK military aircraft at perigee and then downlink data via laser. STRV-2 also carries vibration isolation and debris impact sensors. It is a follow-on to the STRV 1 microsatellites launched piggyback on Ariane in Jun 1994.
    The secondary payload on TSX-5 is the S97-1 CEASE device. The Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor, developed by AFRL (USAF Research Lab), is a prototype sensor package to provide warning of spacecraft charging and radiation events.
     TSX-5 is the fifth in the STEP (Space Test Experiments Program) series of satellites. The name was changed to TSX (Tri-Service Experiments)
The launcher: Orbital Sciences launched its first Pegasus of the year. The L-1011 Stargazer OCA carrier airplane took off from RW-30/12 at Vandenberg on 7 June at 12h21 UTC and flew to the drop box at 36.0° North and 123.0° West over the Pacific. The L-1011 dropped the Pegasus XL rocket at 13h19 UTC and five seconds later the first stage ignited. Third stage separation at 13h34 UTC placed the TSX-5 payload in orbit.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 428& 429 ; Spacewarn No. 560 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-030A ; TSX-5 Project :
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Ekspress A3
Spacecraft:  Ekspress A No. 3
Chronologies: 2000 payload #50 ; 2000-031A ; 5847th spacecraft
Type: Communications (multi-service)
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 24 June 2000 at 0h28 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-200?, by a D-1-e/Proton/DM-2M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 120° East longitude
Mission: Express A3 is a Russian communications spacecraft that relaies services for television and radio programs and telephone services in digital format throughout Russia. The 2,600-kg spacecraft use the on-orbit name Ekspress 3A.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 429 ; Spacewarn No. 560 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-031A ;
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FY-2 / Feng Yun 2B
Spacecraft:  Feng Yun Er Yi
Chronologies: 2000 payload #51 ; 2000-032A ; 5848th spacecraft
Type: Meteorology
Sponsor: China 
Launch: 25 June 2000 at 11h50 UTC, from Xichang Space Launch Center's LC-1, by a Chang Zheng 3.
Orbit: Geostationaty at 104° East
Mission: Fengyun 2 is a Chinese meteorological spacecraft which is equipped with a scanning radiometer, a cloud mapper and a water vapor scanner to provide timely weather data. This second Fengyun-2 weights around 1,400 kg and is spin-stabilized, similar to the older generation GOES satellites and the Himawari and Meteosat satellites. (There was another Fengyun 2 launched in 1997 (which retired in April 2000 after a three year mission) and two Fengyun 1 launched in 1988 and 1990.)
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 429 & 479 ; Spacewarn No. 560 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-032A ;
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Nadezhda 6
Spacecraft:  Nadezhda 17F118 No. 701 (Nadezhda means "hope".)
Chronologies: 2000 payload #52 ; 2000-033A ; 5849th spacecraft
Type: Navigation (search & rescue)
Sponsor: Russian Defense ministry
Launch: 28 June 2000 at 10h37 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-132, by a Kosmos-3M.
Orbit: 684 km x 708 km x 98.1° x 98.7 min
Mission: Nadezhda is a Russian search and relay spacecraft intended to locate ships or aircraft in distress. It is a member of the international COSPAS/SARSAT fleet of such satellites. The operating frequencies are the internationally dedicated 150.00 and 400.00 MHz. (Since the previous one was Nadezhda 5, this latest should be designated as Nadezhda 6.) 
Notes: The Nadezhda navigation/search satellite, built by AKO Polyot of Omsk, is an 800 kg cylinder with a gravity gradient boom for stabilization and derives from the Tsiklon navigation-communications satellite of the early 1970s, which was the Soviet analog to the U.S. Navy's Transit. The system was developed by the NPO PM organization in Krasnoyarsk but later transferred to Polyot.
     The 11F617 Tsiklon satellite flew from 1967 to 1978. Its successor, the 11F627 Tsiklon-B (or Parus), began flight tests in 1974 and is still in service. An advanced version used also for civilian navigation, the 11F643 Tsikada, first flew in 1976. The 11F643N modification of Tsikada, referred to as Nadezhda, made 3 flights from 1982 to 1984 carrying French-developed COSPAS search and rescue packages. These were followed by the operational 17F118 Nadezhda satellites, of which six have now been launched.
The launcher: It is the first ever sun-synchronous launch from the northern Plesetsk launch site. The Kosmos-3M rocket appears to have launched southbound into a suborbital trajectory.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 429 ; Spacewarn No. 560 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-033A ;
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Tsinghua 1
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #53 ; 2000-033B ; 5850th spacecraft
0thType: Technology
Sponsor: China's Tsinghua University of Beijing
Launch: 28 June 2000 at 10h37 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-132, by a Kosmos-3M.
Orbit: 677 km x 703 km x 98.12° x 98.7 min
Mission: Tzinghua 1 is a Chinese microsatellite that is a demonstration model of a future seven-satellite fleet that will monitor natural disasters and help train students. The spacecraft is built by Surrey Satellite (SSTL) of England, is owned by Tsinghua University of Beijing and carries imager and communications payloads. The 50-kg, 0.69 x 0.36 x 0.36-meter box-shaped satellite is a standard SSTL microsat bus. Earlier SSTL microsats deployed a 6-meter gravity gradient boom for stabilization.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 429 ; Spacewarn No. 560 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-033B ;
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SNAP 1
Spacecraft:  Surrey Nanosatellite Applications Platform 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #54 ; 2000-033C ; 5851st spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: United Kingdom
Launch: 28 June 2000 at 10h37 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-132, by a Kosmos-3M.
Orbit: 677 km x 703 km x 98.12° x 98.7 min
Mission: SNAP 1 is a British student-built nanosatellite that demonstrated the successful assembly of a satellite with commercially available miniature electro-mechanical parts. Built by Surrey Satellite (SSTL) of England, the spacecraft is a 6-kg satellite with imager and propulsion and will test rendezvous techniques by formation flying with Tsinghua.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 429 ; Spacewarn No. 560 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-033C ;
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TDRS 8
Spacecraft:  TDRS H
Chronologies: 2000 payload #55 ; 2000-034A ; 5852nd spacecraft
Type: Communications (data relay)
Sponsor: NASA
Source : Boeing
Launch: 30 June 2000 at 12h55 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-36, by an Atlas IIA (AC-139).
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: This first Advanced Tracking and Data Relay is a NASA relay satellites. The 2,910-kg (dry), 2.04-kW spacecraft carries two steerable, 5-meter diameter dishes to enable many channels in C-, Ku-, and Ka-bands, with rates of 300 Mbits/s in the Ku-band, and 800 Mbits/s in the Ka-band. In addition, a phased array antenna in C-band can receive signals from five different spacecraft simultaneously, while transmitting to one of them. This spacecraft brings to seven the number of operational spacecraft in this fleet (TDRS-B had perished on the Challenger shuttle in 1986). TDRS H (named TDRS 8 in orbit), is a Hughes HS-601 class comsat. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center chose Boeing Satellite Systems in February 1995 to build three next-generation TDRS (TDRS-H, I and J) under a $481.6 million contract. 
Notes: TDRS H was launched by International Launch Services with a Lockheed Martin's Atlas-Centaur, a two-stage Atlas IIA variant.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 429 ; Spacewarn No. 560 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-034A ; Boeing's TDRS H, I, J :
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Sirius 1 / SD-RADIO 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2000 payload #56 ; 2000-035A ; 5853rd spacecraft
Type: Communications (radio broadcasting)
Sponsor: U.S. Digital Audio Radio Satellite
Launch: 30 June 2000 at 22h08 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81R, by a D-1-e/Proton/DM-3.
Orbit: 24,388 km x 47,097 km x 63.3° x 24 hr 
Mission: Sirius 1 is a communications spacecraft that provides 100 S-band channels of commercial-free, digital, CD-quality music, news and entertainment (including "Car Talk") mainly to motorists in the continental USA. Most broadcasts will originate from New York, and the satellite-relayed signals will be rebroadcast by a network of 105 transmitters in dense urban areas. Listening requires a special, factory-installed receiver and, of course, a monthly subscription fee. Two more Sirius satellites are to be launched in September and October 2000.
     The spacecraft was placed on an elliptical looping orbit which keeps it between longitude 60° West and 140° West, with apogee over the northern hemisphere. Sirius 1 is a Space Systems/Loral LS-1300 satellite with a dry mass of 1,570 kg. (This satellite is not to be confused with Nordiska Satellit AB's Sirius 1, an HS-376 satellite launched in 1989 as Marcopolo 1 but purchased and renamed by NSAB in Decembger 1993.)
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 429 & 430 ; Spacewarn No. 560 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-035A ;
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Kosmos 2371
Spacecraft:  Geizer No. 22L
Chronologies: 2000 payload #57 ; 2000-036A ; 5854th spacecraft
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russian Defense ministry
Launch: 4 July 2000 at 23h44 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-200?, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-2?
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: A Geizer military communications relay. Geizer satellites are built by NPO PM using the KAUR-3 bus.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 430 ; Spacewarn No. 561 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-036A ;
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Zvezda / ISS-1R
Spacecraft:  DOS-7K No. 8 / 17KSM No. 128-1 (Zvezda means Star.)
Chronologies: 2000 payload #58 ; 2000-037A ; 5855th spacecraft
Type: Space station module
Sponsor: Rosaviakosmos / Russian Space Agency
Launch: 12 July 2000 at 4h56 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81L, by a D-1-e/Proton-K. 
Orbit: Circulat at ~400 km x 51.6°
Mission: Zvezda is a Russian "service module" that is to be a primary and vital component of ISS (at least during its construction phase), providing life-support function and electrical power for all other modules, enabling command and control, and providing residential quarters for the working crew. The 20 tonne module has three docking hatches and 14 windows. It was once being built as a replacement for the aging Mir. It carries about four thousand instruments and machinary units, compared to 1,500 in Zarya and 235 in Unity
     It is the eighth civilian Salyut-class space station. Zvezda is outwardly almost identical to the Mir core module launched in 1986, and the main structure is similar to all the civilian DOS orbital stations launched since 1971 built by the Krunichev company and developed and operated by Energiya. Launch mass of Zvezda is 20,295 kg. 
     Zarya docked with the Zarya module automatically on 26 July 200 at 0h45 UTC, forming the basic core of the International Space Station. The first construction crew of three is expected to reach the ISS on a Soyuz craft on 30 October 2000. Currently, the vision, mission and goal of ISS remain as its successful construction by 2005. (Note: this was the fifth Proton launch in a month.)
Notes: Issue 9/2000 of Novosti Kosmonavtiki reports that the main hull of the Service Module was built as early as 1985, when it was thought that the vehicle would form the core of a Mir-2 space station. Zvezda's forward section is the PkhO (Perekhodniy Otsek, transfer compartment) with three passive SSVP-M G8000 docking ports, one on the axis (docked to Zarya), one zenith and one nadir, plus a side airlock hatch for spacewalks. Behind PKhO is the RO (Rabochiy Otsek, working compartment) with 2.9-meter and 4.1-meter diameter sections. The small section carries the two large solar arrays. Further back is the AO (Agregatniy Otsek, equipment module) with the main ODU twin S5.79 engines. Inside the AO is the smaller cylinder of the PK (Promezhutochnaya kamera), the tunnel leading to the SSVP G4000 aft passive docking port used for Soyuz and Progress.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 430, 431 & 439 ; Spacewarn No. 561 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-037A ;
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Echostar VI
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #59 ; 2000-038A ; 5856th spacecraft
Type: Communications (DBS)
Sponsor: Echostar Communication Corp
Launch: 14 July 2000 at 5h21 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-36B, by an Atlas IIAS (AC-161). 
Orbit: Geostationary at 119° West longitude
Mission: Echostar 6 is a communications spacecraft that carries about 16 transponders in Ku-band to provide many voice and video channels direct-to-home in North America. Echostar VI is a Space Systems/Loral LS-1300 satellite with a dry mass of 1,493 kg.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 430 ; Spacewarn No. 561 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-038A ;
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MITA / MITA-O
Spacecraft:  MITA is an Italian acronym for Minisatellite, Italy, Technology and Advanced (all in Italian equivalents).
Chronologies: 2000 payload #60 ; 2000-039A ; 5857th spacecraft
Type: Earth-space studies
Sponsor: ISA / Italian Space Agency
Launch: 15 July 2000 at 12h00 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-132, by a Kosmos-3M.
Orbit: 422 km x 476 km x 87.3° x 93.6 min
Decayed: 15 August 2001
Mission: MITA-O is an Italian experimental minisatellite built by Carlo Gavazzi Space of Milano and is controlled by Telespazio's Corcolle center near Roma. It has a mass of 170 kg and carries the NINA particle detector and an experimental attitude control system. The 170 kg spacecraft carries instruments to monitor cosmic rays and Earth's magnetic field. The package has been named NINA and some reports carry this name as an alternative spacecraft name.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 430 & 432 ; Spacewarn No. 561 & 573 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-039A ;
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CHAMP
Spacecraft:  CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload
Chronologies: 2000 payload #61 ; 2000-039B ; 5858th spacecraft
Type: Geophysics
Sponsor: Germany's GFZ
Launch: 15 July 2000 at 12h00 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-132, by a Kosmos-3M.
Orbit: 416 km x 476 km x 87.3° x 93.5 min
Mission: CHAMP is a German environmental research minispacecraft that carries instruments for collecting geophysical, oceanographic and meteorological data. The 500-kg, triaxially stabilized spacecraft is operated by GFZ, the Potsdam geophysics center to study the magnetic field and the gravitational field.
     CHAMP has begun operations after some minor problems with star sensors, possibly due to damage during fairing separation. 
Launch: This is the second recent Kosmos-3M launch to a new inclination: before last week's sun-synchronous launch, the highest inclination achieved from Plesetsk was 83 degrees.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 430 & 432 ; Spacewarn No. 561 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-039B ;
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Rubin / Bird-Rubin
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #62 ; 2000-039C ; 5859th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: Germany
Launch: 15 July 2000 at 12h00 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-132, by a Kosmos-3M.
Orbit: 416 km x 476 km x 87.3° x 93.5 min
Decayed: 30 August 2001
Mission: Rubin is a German microsatellite (37 kg) that carries components for testing in the space environment. 
It also measures launch vehicle parameters developed by OHB and students of the Hochschule Bremen. Rubin remains attached to the payload adapter on the Kosmos-3M final stage. It is also called BIRD-Rubin in some references, but confusingly is not related to the BIRD microsatellite originally slated for this launch.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 430 ; Spacewarn No. 561 & 573 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-039C ;
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Navstar 44 (USA 151)
Spacecraft:  Navstar SVN 44 / GPS 2R-5
Chronologies: 2000 payload #63 ; 2000-040A ; 5860th spacecraft
Type: Navigation
Families: 48th Navstar (5th second-generation replacement)
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Source: A. Parsch
Launch: 16 July 2000 at 9h17 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-17A, by a Delta 7925.
Orbit: Circular at ~ 20,500 km x 38,9°
Mission: Navstar 48 is an American navigational satellite in the GPS constellation. The total number in the fleet is now 29, including five spares. The GPS IIR series are built by Lockheed Martin/Sunnyvale and have a dry mass of 980 kg. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 430 ; Spacewarn No. 561 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-040A ;
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Samba / Cluster II FM7
Spacecraft:  FM7
Chronologies: 2000 payload #64 ; 2000-041A ; 5861st spacecraft
Type: Magnetospheric research
Sponsor: ESA / European Space Agency
Launch: 16 July 2000 at 12h39 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by an A-2/Soyuz-Fregat.
Orbit: Initial: 250 km x 18,072 km x 64.7°
16,869 km x 121,098 km x 90.6° 
Mission: Cluster 2/FM7 and Cluster 2/FM6 are the first two of a four-spacecraft European mission. Each of the cylindrical (3-meter diameter, 1.3-meter height), 1,200-kg (with fuel), and 224-Watts spacecraft carries 11 identical instruments to probe the magnetosphere. All four spacecraft of the Cluster 2 mission have an identical design and payload and were designed to emulate the Cluster that perished during the failed maiden launch of Ariane 5 on 4 June 1996. These satellites, which are built by Astrium/Friedrichshafen (former Dornier), will deploy four 50-meter wire antennas. 
Launch: The Soyuz launch vehicle is built by TsSKB-Progress, with the Fregat upper stage developed by Lavochkin and the Soyuz-Fregat launch services provided by the French company Starsem.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 430 & 432 ; Spacewarn No. 561 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-044A ;
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Salsa / Cluster II FM8
Spacecraft:  FM8
Chronologies: 2000 payload #65 ; 2000-041B ; 5862nd spacecraft
Type: Magnetospheric research
Sponsor: ESA / European Space Agency
Launch: 16 July 2000 at 12h39 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by an A-2/Soyuz-Fregat.
Orbit: Initial: 250 km x 18,072 km x 64.7°
16,714 km x 121,090 km x 90.5°
Mission: Cluster 2/FM7 and Cluster 2/FM6 are the first two of a four-spacecraft European mission. Each of the cylindrical (3-meter diameter, 1.3-meter height), 1,200-kg (with fuel), and 224-W spacecraft carries 11 identical instruments to probe the magnetosphere. All four spacecraft of the Cluster 2 mission have an identical design and payload, and were designed to emulate the Cluster that perished during the failed maiden launch of Ariane 5 on 4 June 1996. These satellites, which are built by Astrium/Friedrichshafen (former Dornier), will deploy four 50-meter wire antennas. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 430 & 432 ; Spacewarn No. 561 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-041B ;
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Mightysat 2.1 / Sindri
Spacecraft:  P99-1 (Mightsat 2.1 means first flight of the series-2 version)
Chronologies: 2000 payload #66 ; 2000-042A ; 5863rd spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 19 July 2000 at 20h09 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's CLF, by a Minotaur.
Orbit: 547 km x 581 km x 97.8°
Decayed: 12 November 2002
Mission: Mightsat 2.1 is an American military minispacecraft to test/demonstrate components for future utilization. The 130 kg spacecraft carries two kinds of hardware for tests. In the list of "unproven technologies" are SAC which focuses solar energy on solar cells, NSX that is an ultra-light weight communications unit and MFCBS that contains a multifunctional composite bus structure. In the list of "stand alone experiments" is FTHSI that provides hyperspectral images through a Fourier transform technique, QS40 that monitors radiation damage in microelectronic components, SMATTE to investigate the bimodal behavior of composite sheets that change physical properties such as stiffness by tailored thermal inputs but can recover to the original status after heating above a transition temperature, and SAFI that carries embedded copper wires in a composite film to help reduce the weight of components.
     Mightysat 2.1 is a 125-kg Spectrum Astro SA-200B platform that carries a hyperspectral imager for earth imaging and spectroscopy, as well as satellite technology experiments such as advanced solar arrays. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 431 ; Spacewarn No. 561 & 589 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-042A;
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Picosat 7/Picosat 8 Tethered Picosat
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #67 ; 2000-042C ; 5864th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense's DARPA
Launch: 19 July 2000 at 20h09 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's CLF, by a Minotaur.
Orbit: 547 km x 581 km x 97.8°
Decayed: 11 July 2002
Mission: An Aerospace Corp./DARPA picosatellite experiment, consisting of two small boxes connected by a deployable tether, is attached to Mightysat and was deployed. A similar picosat was deployed on the previous Minotaur launch in January.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 431 ; Spacewarn No. 561 & 585 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-042C ;
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DARPA Picosat 23 / MEMS 3/MEMS 4
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #68 ; 2000-042 ; 5865th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 19 July 2000 at 20h09 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's CLF, by a Minotaur.
Orbit: 547 km x 581 km x 97.8°
Mission: An Aerospace Corp./DARPA picosatellite experiment, consisting of two small boxes connected by a deployable tether, is attached to Mightysat and wasdeployed later. A similar picosat was deployed on the previous Minotaur launch in January.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 431 ; Spacewarn No. 561 ; National Space Science Data Center's ;
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PAS 9 / PanAmSat 9
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #69 ; 2000-043A ; 5866th spacecraft
Type: Communicaions (multi-service)
Sponsor: Panamsat Corp
Launch: 28 July 2000 at 22h42 UTC, from Odyssey platform, by a Zenit-3SL.
Orbit: Geostationary at 58° West.
Mission: PAS 9 is a communications spacecraft that carries 24 Ku-band and 24 C-band transponders to provide over 160 voice, video, data and internet channels to North America, the Caribbean and Europe. It replaces PAS 5. The 2,389-kg spacecraft is a Hughes HS-601HP spacecraft.
Launch: This Sea Launch occured from the Odyssey platform stationed at 154° West and 0° North in the Pacific.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 431 ; Spacewarn No. 561 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-043A ;
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Progress M1-3 / ISS-1P
Spacecraft:  Progress-M1 11F615A55 (7K-TGM) No. 251
Chronologies: 2000 payload #70 ; 2000-044A ; 5867th spacecraft
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Sponsor: Rosaviakosmos / Russian Space Agency
Launch: 6 August 2000 at 18h27 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz-U.
Orbit:
Deorbit: 1st November 2000 at 7h05 UTC.
Mission: Progress M1-3 is a Russian automatic cargo carrier that carries 1.5 tonnes of fuel and 615 kg of various equipment, water and food to deliver to the International Space Station. It automatically docked with the Unity/Zarya/Zvezda complex on 8 August 2000 at 20h13 UTC. Three months later, Progress M1-3 undocked from Zvezda's rear port on 1st November 2000 at 4h05 UTC and was deorbited over the Pacific.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 431, 432 & 438 ; Spacewarn No. 562 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-044A ;
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Rumba / Cluster II FM5 (Phoenix)
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #71 ; 2000-045A ; 5868th spacecraft
Type: Magnetospheric research
Sponsor: ESA / European Space Agency
Launch: 9 August 2000 at 11h13 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by an A-2/Soyuz-Fregat.
Orbit: 17,200 km x 120,600 km x 90°
Mission: The second pair of Cluster II magnetospheric research satellites is identical to the one launched on 16 July. By 13 August 2000, Rumba and Tango were in similar orbits to Salsa and Samba. The orbits of these four spacecrafts will be frequently maneuvered so as to achieve the targeted investigations. On 26 August, they began stationkeeping, maintaining separations from a few hundred to some thousands of kilometers in a tetrahedral constellation.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 432 ; Spacewarn No. 562 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-045A ;
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Tango / Cluster II FM8
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #72 ; 2000-045B ; 5869th spacecraft
Type: Magnetospheric research
Sponsor: ESA / European Space Agency
Launch: 9 August 2000 at 11h13 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by an A-2/Soyuz-Fregat.
Orbit: 17,200 km x 120,600 km x 90°
Mission: The second pair of Cluster II magnetospheric research satellites is identical to the one launched on 16 July. By 13 August 2000, Rumba and Tango were in similar orbits to Salsa and Samba. The orbits of these four spacecrafts will be frequently maneuvered so as to achieve the targeted investigations. On 26 August, they began stationkeeping, maintaining separations from a few hundred to some thousands of kilometers in a tetrahedral constellation.
Source: Jonathan Space ReportNo. 432 ; Spacewarn No. 562 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-045B ;
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Brasilsat B-4
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #73 ; 2000-046A ; 5870th spacecraft
Type: Communications (multi-service)
Sponsor: Embratel Brazilian communications company
Launch: 17 August 2000 at 23h16 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 44LP (V131).
Orbit: Geostationary at 92° West longitude
Mission: Brazilsat B4 is a Brazilian communications spacecraft that carries 28 C-band transponders to provide voice and video communications to the entire South American continent. It replaces the 15-year-old Brasilsat A2. The 1,757 kg (with fuel) spacecraft is the fourth and last of the Brasilsat B series which use a unique Hughes HS-376W bus, based on the old HS-376 spin-stabilized design but with a larger diameter and using the R-4D liquid apogee motor instead of a solid apogee motor.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 433 ; Spacewarn No. 562 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-046A ;
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Nilesat 102
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #74 ; 2000-046B ; 5871st spacecraft
Type: Communications (multi-service)
Sponsor: Nilesat SA Egyptian communications company
Launch: 17 August 2000 at 23h16 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 44LP (V131).
Orbit: Geostationary at 7° East longitude
Mission: Nilesat 102 is a communications spacecraft that carries 12 Ku-band 100 Watts transponders to provide digital communications for countries in North Africa and Middle East. The 1,827 kg (with fuel) spacecraft joins Nilesat 101 in providing Ku-band broadcast services. It has a dry mass of 813 kg, a launch mass of 1,827 kg.  It is a Eurostar 2000 class bus built by Astrium SAS of Toulouse (formerly Matra).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 433 ; Spacewarn No. 562 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-046B ;
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ONYX 4 (USA 152)
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #75 ; 2000-047A ; 5872nd spacecraft
Type: Reconnaissance
Sponsor: U.S. National Reconnaissance Office
Launch: 17 August 2000 at 23h45 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-4E, by a Titan 4B (B-28).
Orbit: Initial: 572 km x 675 km x 68.0°
681 km x 695 km x 68.1° 
Mission: USA 152 is an American radar-imaging military/NRO satellite. It is the fourth in the Lacrosse series, and is probably a replacement for the aging Lacrosse 2. The spacecraft is an ONYX (formerly LACROSSE) radar imaging spacecraft built by Lockheed Martin.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 433 ; Spacewarn No. 562 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-047A ;
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DM-F3
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #76 ; 2000-048A ; 5873rd spacecraft
Type: Test
Sponsor: Boeing
Launch: 23 August 2000 at 11h05 UTC, from Canaveral Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-17B, by a Delta 8930. 
Orbit: 190 km x 20,655 km x 27.6° (geostationary transfert orbit)
Mission: DM-F3 is a dummy satellite that was used to test the launch capability of the new model Delta 3 rocket. The DM-F3 payload is a mass model of the Orion 3 HS-601 satellite launched on the second Delta 3. The 4,348 kg satellite is a 2.0-meter diameter, 1.7-meter high steel spool cylinder with two circular end plates, painted with black and white patterns; it will be used by US Air Force researchers as a calibration target for a novel tracking technique. The satellite was built by Boeing/Huntington Beach. This third Boeing Delta III launch was completed successfully and the dummy DM-F3 satellite was placed in orbit.
     The satellites was placed into a 190 km x 20,655 km x 27.6 deg; the intended orbit was a much higher 183 x 25,778 km x 27.5 deg according to the press kit. This would correspond to a 0.15 km/s underspeed, but a Boeing press release on Aug 24 said that because of the fuel temperature and atmospheric conditions on the day of launch, the actual expected apogee was 23,400 km with an error of 3,000 km, so the mission was just within target limits. Since the flight was to fuel depletion instead of targeting a specific orbit, the final orbit achieved does depend on atmospheric density.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 433 ; Spacewarn No. 562 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-048A ;
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Raduga 1-5
Spacecraft:  Globus No. 16L
Chronologies: 2000 payload #77 ; 2000-049A ; 5874th spacecraft
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russian Defense ministry
Launch: 28 August 2000 at 20h08 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81R, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-2?
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: Raduga 1-5 is a Russian military Globus-type communications. Globus are usually given the public name Raduga-1 but, possibly due to administrative error, this satellite was initially named Kosmos-2372 by the RVSN press service. The Globus satellites replaced the older Gran' (Raduga) series; many Radugas are still in orbit, but only about five of them are operational.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 434 ; Spacewarn No. 562 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-049A ;
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ZY-2 / Zi Yuan-2
Spacecraft:  Also known as Zhangguo Ziyuan 2 (meaning China Resource 2)
Chronologies: 2000 payload #78 ; 2000-050A ; 5875th spacecraft
Type: Reconnaissance
Sponsor: China
Launch: 1st September 2000 at 3h25 UTC, from Taiyuan Space Center, by a Chang Zheng 4B.
Orbit: 483 km x 499 km x 97.4° x 94.4 min
Mission: While disguised as a civilian earth monitoring system, ZY-2 was actually code-named Jianbing-3 and was China's first high-resolution military imaging satellite. The cover story of the official Xinhua news agency was that the civilian remote sensing system would be used primarily in territorial surveying, city planning, crop yield assessment, disaster monitoring and space science experimentation. However the satellite was placed at a much lower altitude than the ZY-1 satellite and US intelligence sources indicated that it was a photo-reconnaissance satellite for exclusively military purposes, such as targeting missiles at US and Taiwanese forces. The new satellite was believed to employ digital-imaging technology and to have a resolution of 2 m or less. The satellite was designed and built by the Chinese Academy of Space Technology and was developed indigenously. It was said to be more advanced than earlier sensing satellites and was expected to have an orbital life of two years. The camera provided more than three times the resolution of the ZY-1 earth resources satellite. The Zi Yuan 2 satellite may have used the CBERS Sino-Brazilian bus of the earlier ZY-1. However it was also said to be of new design and demonstrated the capability to maneuver in orbit, adjusting its orbit after launch. In October 2000 Chinese scientists denied that the ZY-2 satellite had a military mission. It was said to be a remote-sensing satellite equipped with CCD cameras and an infrared multispectral scanner that could only identify objects on the ground with a resolution of several dozen meters to 1 km.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 434 ; Spacewarn No. 563 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-050A ; Mark Wades's Encyclopedia Astronautica's Chronology (2000 Sep 1) ;
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Sirius 2 / SD-RADIO 2
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #79 ; 2000-051A ; 5876th spacecraft
Type: Communications (radio broadcasting)
Sponsor: U.S. Digital Audio Radio Satellite
Launch: 5 September 2000 at 9h43 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81L, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM3.
Orbit:
Mission: Sirius 2 is a communications spacecraft that enables S-band digital radio broadcasts (music, news, and entertainment) directly or through urban relay stations to motorists in North America. The Sirius constellation will be completed with the launch of a third spacecraft later this year. The satellite is a Space Systems/Loral FS-1300 with a dry mass of 1,570 kg and a launch mass of 3,800 kg. Take care not to confuse this Sirius 2 with its namesake, the Sirius 2 launched in November 1997 by Nordiska Satellit AB which provides communications services to Scandinavia.
Launch: This is another International Launch Services Proton flight.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 434 ; Spacewarn No. 563 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-051A ;
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Eutelsat W1
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #80 ; 2000-052A ; 5877th spacecraft
Type: Communications (multi-service)
Sponsor: Eutelsat / European Telecommunications Satellite Organization
Launch: 6 September 2000 at 22h33 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 44P (V132).
Orbit: Geostationary at 10° East longitude.
Mission: Eutelsat W1 is a communications spacecraft that provides voice and video transmission to Europe and southern Africa through its 28 Ku-band transponders. The 1,300 kg (dry)  box-shaped (2.5 x 5.0-meter) satellite has two rectangular solar panel arrays spanning 31.7 meters and two dishes, a European beam and a steerable beam..The Eutelsat-W constellation now has four members including the W2, W3, and W4 that had been launched earlier.
     The first Eutelsat W1 satellite was damaged in a fire in the Cannes factory in 1998. Construction of a second Eutelsat "W1R" was begun as well as a ground spare, called Ressat, built by Matra Marconi Space/Toulouse (now part of the Astrium company). The second Eutelsat W1 was reassigned to become Eurobird and will be launched to 28° East, with Ressat becoming the third and final Eutelsat W1. .
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 434 & 490 ; Spacewarn No. 563 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-052A ;
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STS-106 / ISS-2A.2b
Spacecraft:  Space Shutle #99 ; Atlantis (22nd flight)
Chronologies: 2000 payload #81 ; 2000-053A ; 5878th spacecraft
Type: Piloted spaceflight (to the International Space Station)
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 8 September 2000 at 12h45 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39B, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit: 375 km x 386 kmx 51.6° x 92.2 min
Landed: 20 September 2000 at 7h56 UTC
Mission: STS 106 carries 2.5 tonnes of cargo to deliver to the International Space Station. The seven-person crew worked also to unload the cargo from an earlier-launched Progress craft into the Zvezda module and to repair, furbish, or refurbish the machines and batteries on-board the Zvezda and Zarya modules.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 435 ; Spacewarn No. 563 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-053A ;
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Astra 2B
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #82 ; 2000-054A ; 5879th spacecraft
Type: Communications (DBS)
Sponsor: Luxembourg-based SES / Société Européenne de Satellites
Launch: 14 September 2000 at 22h54 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 (Ariane 506, V130).
Orbit: Geostationary at 28.2° East longitude.
Mission: Astra 2B is a communications spacecraft that provides digital video broadcasts to most of Europe through its 30 high power Ku-band transponders. This is an Astrium/Toulouse Eurostar 2000+ television broadcast satellite. Its dry mass is around 1,400 kg and it carries about 1,900 kg of fuel at launch. The satellite will replace the German DFS Kopernikus system. Astra 2B is the 18th Eurostar 2000 launched and is the first SES satellite built by a European prime contractor.
Launcher: The Ariane 5 launch vehicle is Europe's largest rocket, with two strapon solid boosters (EAP) and a liquid hydrogen engined core stage (EPC), with a storable propellant upper stage (EPS). This is the fourth success in a row for Ariane 5 following two early test failures.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 435 ; Spacewarn No. 563 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-054A ;
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GE 7
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #83 ; 2000-054B ; 5880th spacecraft
Type: Communications (DBS)
Sponsor: GE Americom
Launch: 14 September 2000 at 22h54 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 (Ariane 506, V130).
Orbit: Geostationary at 137° West longitude
Mission: GE 7 is a communications spacecraft that provides direct-to-home cable TV distribution coverage over the US and has 24 C-band transponders. Its mass is 912 kg and it carries 1,023 kg of fuel at launch. The satellite is an A2100A model built by Lockheed Martin/Sunnyvale, the first lightweight A2100 with a mass about half that of earlier A2100 satellites. GE 7 continues one of the longest series of commercial communications satellites, which began with Americom's RCA Satcom 1 in 1975 (Americom was then owned by RCA). All the satellites were built by RCA Astro Space/East Windsor and its successors (now LMMS/Sunnyvale).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 435 ; Spacewarn No. 563 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-054B ;
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NOAA 16
Spacecraft:  NOAA-L / Advanced Tiros N
Chronologies: 2000 payload #84 ; 2000-055A ; 5881st spacecraft
Type: Meteorology
Sponsor: U.S. NOAA / National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Launch: 21 September 2000 at 10h22 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-4W, by a Titan II (23G-13).
Orbit: 845 km x 850 km x 98.8° x 102.1 min, sun-synchronous orbit
Mission: NOAA 16 is an American weather monitoring satellite. The NOAA-L, renamed NOAA 16, is an Advanced Tiros N model built by Lockheed Martin that carries a suite of imaging and sounding instruments. The 2,200 kg cylindrical (diameter 2 meters, length 4 meters) spacecraft carries several atmospheric and weather monitoring instruments. The AVHRR-3 (Advanced High Resolution Radiometer) has six wavelength channels of which the first three monitor the backscattered solar energy, and the second three monitor the emissions from land, sea, and clouds, all with a spatial resolution of 1.1 km. The HIRS-3 (High-resolution Infrared Sounder) monitors the atmosphere at 19 closely spaced channels so as to derive the vertical temperature profile out to an altitude of 40 km. The AMSU-A and AMSU-B (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit) capture the microwave emissions. The SBUV-2 (Solar Backscatter Ultra Violet) instrument derives the ozone profile by monitoring the incident and backscattered radiation in 12 wavelength bands. The spacecraft also carries a SEM-2 instrument to monitor kilovolt and megavolt electrons and protons. 
     On 9 June 2014, ground controllers decommissioned NOAA 16 after it completed 70,655 orbits of the Earth and traveled 3.4 billion kilometres since its launch in 2000.  It was then reported that the craft experienced a "critical anomaly" on June 5. "No data recovery and no command verification possible at this time."
Notes: The NOAA satellites form the POES (Polar Operational Environmental Satellite) low orbit constellation which complements the GOES geostationary constellation, and are the programmatic descendants of the original Tiros 1 weather satellite launched in 1960. They are developed by NASA-GSFC and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 435 ; Spacewarn No. 563 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-055A ; SpaceflightNow's 11 Jun 14
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Kosmos 2372
Spacecraft:  Orlets-2 / Yenisey
Chronologies: 2000 payload #85 ; 2000-056A ; 5882nd spacecraft
Type: Reconnaissance
Sponsor: Russian Defense ministry
Launch: 25 September 2000 at 10h10 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-45, by a J-1/Zenit-2 (11K77).
Orbit: 220 km x 364 km x 64.8° x 90.1 min
Recovered?: 20 April 2001.
Mission: Cosmos 2372 is a 12-tonne Russian military photo reconnaissance spacecraft that is fitted with 22 capsules to carry and land the high resolution photographs. Unlike previous photo reconnaissance spacecraft (which had functioned only for two to three months), this one is expected to function for a year. The new spacecraft's real code name is Yenisey (which is the name of one of the great rivers in Russia). Observers speculate that Yenisey is an improved version of the Orlets spy satellite launched as Kosmos 2290 in 1994.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436 ; Spacewarn No. 563 & 570 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-056A ;
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TiungSAT-1 / Malaysian-OSCAR-46 (MO-46)
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2000 payload #86 ; 2000-057A ; 5883rd spacecraft
Type: Earth imaging
Sponsor: Malaysia Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment
Launch: 26 September 2000 at 10h05 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr (15A18).
Orbit: 640 km x 644 km x 64.6°
Mission: Tiungsat 1 is a Malaysian remote sensing satellite. This 50-kg satellite with 80-meter resolution is built by Surrey Satellite and Astronautic Technology SB for the BKSA (Bahagian Kajian Sains Angkasa, the Space Science Studies Division under the Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment). 
Launcher: The Dnepr rocket is a modified RS-20 ICBM, known in the NATO countries as SS-18 and as Satan, and was launched from a silo in Baykonur. This second Dnepr launch vehicle is a refurbished R-36M2 (15A18 or 15A18M) ballistic missile with two main stages and a post-boost stage used to target reentry vehicles.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436 ; Spacewarn No. 563 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-057A ; A Brief History of Amateur Satellites ;
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MegSat-1
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #87 ; 2000-057B ; 5884th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: Italy's MegSat Space Division
Launch: 26 September 2000 at 10h05 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr (15A18).
Orbit: 640 km x 644 km x 64.6°
Mission: Megsat-1 is a 56-kg environment monitoring research satellite owned and built by MegSat Space Division, part of the Gruppo Meggiorin companies in Brescia, Italy. (Megsat-0 was launched in April 1999).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436 ; Spacewarn No. 563 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-057B ;
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UniSat
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #88 ; 2000-057C ; 5885th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: Italy's GAUSS 
Launch: 26 September 2000 at 10h05 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr (15A18).
Orbit: 640 km x 644 km x 64.6°
Mission: Unisat is a 10-kg educational advancement experimental satellite developed by the GAUSS (Gruppo di Astrodinamica dell' Universita degli Studi "la Sapienza") in Roma. Unisat was financed by ASI and MURST (Ministero dell'Universtia e della Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica). It carries NiMH batteries, a magnetometer and a payload consisting of a space debris sensor and a camera.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436; Spacewarn No. 563 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-057C ;
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SaudiSat 1a / Saudi OSCAR 41 (SO-41)
Spacecraft:  Saudisat 1A (Aprize?)
Chronologies: 2000 payload #89 ; 2000-057D ; 5886th spacecraft
Type: Amateur-radio communications
Sponsor: King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology
Launch: 26 September 2000 at 10h05 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr (15A18).
Orbit: 640 km x 644 km x 64.6°
Mission: Saudisat 1A and 1B are 10-kg satellites developed by the Saudi Institute for Space Research at KACST (King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology), Riyadh, carrying simple amateur store-forward communications payloads. Their amateur radio payloads (Saudi-OSCAR-41 and Saudi-OSCAR-42) have apparently not entered service as of June 2001 (although reportedly have been checked out successfully). 
     Although not announced at the time of launch, these satellites have a secondary commercial payload. Aprize Satellite of Fairfax, Virginia has a 400 MHz UHF Aprizestar commercial satellite location payload on each of the satellites, which will enter operation when Aprize completes financing and developed of user equipment. They will be used as pathfinders for a planned network of asset location satellites (for instance, relaying data from transmitters on shipping containers). These 0.2-m3, 10 kg satellites will be built by SpaceQuest (Aprize's parent company) in Fairfax, but the Saudi satellites were built by and are owned by King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436 & 455 ; Spacewarn No. 563 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-057D ; A Brief History of Amateur Satellites ;
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SaudiSat 1b / Saudi SCAR 42 (SO-42)
Spacecraft:  Saudisat 1B (Aprize?)
Chronologies: 2000 payload #90 ; 2000-057E ; 5887th spacecraft
Type: Amateur-radio communications
Sponsor: King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology
Launch: 26 September 2000 at 10h05 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr (15A18).
Orbit: 640 km x 644 km x 64.6°
Mission: Saudisat 1A and 1B are 10-kg satellites developed by the Saudi Institute for Space Research at KACST (King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology), Riyadh, carrying simple amateur store-forward communications payloads. Their amateur radio payloads (Saudi-OSCAR-41 and Saudi-OSCAR-42) have apparently not entered service as of June 2001 (although reportedly have been checked out successfully). 
     Although not announced at the time of launch, these satellites have a secondary commercial payload. Aprize Satellite of Fairfax, Virginia has a 400 MHz UHF Aprizestar commercial satellite location payload on each of the satellites, which will enter operation when Aprize completes financing and developed of user equipment. They will be used as pathfinders for a planned network of asset location satellites (for instance, relaying data from transmitters on shipping containers). These 0.2-m3, 10 kg satellites will be built by SpaceQuest (Aprize's parent company) in Fairfax, but the Saudi satellites were built by and are owned by King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436 & 455 ; Spacewarn No. 563 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-057E ; A Brief History of Amateur Satellites ;
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Kosmos 2373
Spacecraft: Yantar-1KFT / Kometa No. 20
Chronologies: 2000 payload #91 ; 2000-058A ; 5888th spacecraft
Type: Geodesy
Sponsor: Russian Defense ministry
Launch: 29 September 2000 at 9h30 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by an A-2/Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Initial: 193 km x 267 km x 70.4° x 89 min
211 km x 285 km x 70.4° 
Recovered: 14 November 2000 at 22h53 UTC
Mission: Cosmos 2373 is a Russian cartographic satellite. Its orbit will have a short life of 60 days during which one or more capsules carrying the films will be landing. This is the 20th in the Siluet/Kometa series (Yantar'-1KFT) mapping payload using the Yantar' bus with a Zenit-type recovery sphere. It is announced as a dual civil-military geodetic mission. The Vostok/Zenit-style sphere landed near Orenburg in Russia in November 2000. The first Kometa was launched in February 1981 as Kosmos 1246; the previous flight was Kosmos 2349 in February 1998..
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436, 437 & 439 ; Spacewarn No. 563 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-058A ;
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AAP-1 / GE 1A
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #92 ; 2000-059A ; 5889th spacecraft
Type: Communications (DBS)
Sponsor: GE Americom
Launch: 1st October 2000 at 22h00 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81L, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-3.
Orbit: Geostationary at 108° East longitude
Mission: GE 1A is a communications spacecraft that provides direct-to-home voice, video and data transmission in India, China and Philippines through its 24 C-band and 24 Ku-band transponders. The 3.9 tonne spacecraft is a Lockheed Martin/Sunnyvale A2100AX model Ku-band spacecraft.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436 ; Spacewarn No. 564 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-059A ;
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N-SAT-110 / Superbird 5
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #93 ; 2000-060A ; 5890th spacecraft
Type: Communications (DBS)
Sponsor: Japan's SCC and JSat.
Launch: 6 October 2000 at 23h00 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 42L (V133).
Orbit: Geostationary at 135° East longitude
Mission: NSat 110 is a Japanese communications spacecraft that carries 24 Ku-band transponders to provide direct-to-home television, internet and data transmission service to all of Japan. Also known as Superbird 5, it was another A2100AX satellite. It is jointly owned by SCC (Space Communications Corp of Tokyo) and JSat (Japan Satellite Systems); SCC controls the vehicle on orbit. Dry mass is 1,669 kg.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436 ; Spacewarn No. 564 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-060A ;
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HETE-2
Spacecraft:  High Energy Transient Explorer
Chronologies: 2000 payload #94 ; 2000-061A ; 5891st spacecraft
Type: Astronomy
Sponsor: NASA/MIT
Launch: 9 October 2000 at 5h38 UTC, from Kwajalein Missile Range's RW-06/24 (in the Marshall Islands), by a Pegasus.
Orbit: 595 km x 636 km x 2.0°
Mission: HETE 2 is an astrophysical research spacecraft that carries three instruments to measure gamma rays and x-rays. As soon as a radiation burst is recorded by the instruments, an automatic alarm are relayed to a number of ground astronomy stations around the world to look for the source in visible wavelengths. These very rare/transient bursts are presumed to be extra-galactic, but source identification remains elusive.
    The 130-kg satellite was built to replace the first HETE, which failed to operate because of a Pegasus adapter failure during launch in November 1996. The satellite was built by MIT using leftover parts from HETE. MIT operates the satellite; the program is managed by NASA GSFC as an Explorer mission of opportunity.
Launch: The Orbital Sciences Corp. L-1011 Stargazer aircraft took off from Bucholz Army Airfield (PKWA) Runway 06/24 (at 08 42.9° North and 167 43.6° East) on Kwajalein Island at the southeast end of the atoll on 9 October 2000 at 4h40 UTC. The Stargazer flew to the drop zone at 7.65° North and 167.7° East and at 5h38 UTC dropped the Pegasus launch vehicle at an altitude of 11.9 km. The model used was the Standard Pegasus rather than the newer XL model (strictly, it was a Hybrid Pegasus with some XL components). Five seconds after drop the first, winged, stage ignited and after 10 minutes the third stage cutoff to leave HETE-2 in orbit at 5h50 UTC.
     This was the first orbital launch from USAKA (US Army Kwajalein Atoll) in the Pacific Ocean. Kwajalein, a circular lagoon, is the aim point for Western Range ICBM launches; the US Air Force fires ICBMs at Kwaj and the US Army sits on Kwaj and fires back with experimental anti-missiles. The main launch site is on Meck Island on the north side of the atoll.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436 ; Spacewarn No. 564 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-061A ;
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STS-92 / ISS-3A
Spacecraft: Space Shutle #100 ; Discovery (28th flight)
Chronologies: 2000 payload #95 ; 2000-062A ; 5892nd spacecraft
Type: Piloted spaceflight (to the International Space Station)
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 11 October 2000 at 23h17 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle
Orbit: Circulat at ~400 km x 51.6°
Landed: 24 October 2000 at at 20h59 UTC on Runway 22 at Edwards AFB.
Mission: STS 92 carries the ITS-Z1 truss structure and the PMA-3 docking tunnel to the International Space Station. Z1 is the first segment of the space station truss. It was built by Boeing/Canoga Park and is 3.5 x 4.5 meters in size; it will be docked to the +Z port on Unity. It carries the control moment gyros, the S-band antenna, and the Ku-band antenna. PMA-3, built by Boeing/Huntington Beach, will be docked to the  -Z port opposite Z1. The truss is intended to support a football-field sized solar array that will be installed during a later mission in December 2000.
     The Space Shuttle crew carried out space walks to install the 8.5 tonne, aluminum Z-1 truss on the Unity module. The crew also installed a major 1.2 tonne docking port named Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA) on the Unity module. They fired thrusters in the Shuttle to raise the altitude of the ISS. Among other activities was a practice run of a device named SAFER (Simplified Aid For EVA Rescue) to rescue an untethered astronaut and to assess whether a dead or gravely ill spacewalker could also be retrieved back to a shuttle or the ISS. 
     Discovery's rendezvous with the International Space Station came on 13 October 2000 at 15h39 UTC, with docking at 17h45 UTC. The spaceship docked with PMA-2, the docking port on the +Y port of the Space Station's Unity module. Hatch was open to PMA-2 at 20h30 UTC the same day. On 14 October at 16h15 UTC, the Z1 segment was unberthed from the payload bay and at around 18h20 UTC it was docked to the zenith port on the Unity module. The  hatches between to the Space Station and the Orbiter were closed on 20 October at around 13h30 UTC. Discovery undocked from PMA-2 at 15h08 UTC the same day. Deorbit attempts were waved off on 22 and 23 October; the deorbit burn finally came on 24 October at 19h51:55 UTC, Discovery then made the first Edwards landing for a Space Shuttle since 1996.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436 & 437 ; Spacewarn No. 564 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-062A ;
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Kosmos 2374
Spacecraft: Uragan No. 83L
Chronologies: 2000 payload #96 ; 2000-063A ; 5893rd spacecraft
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: Russian Defense ministry
Launch: 13 October 2000 at 14h12 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-2.
Orbit: 19,120 km x 19,120 km x 64.8°
Mission: Three Uragan ("Hurricane") navigation satellites for the GLONASS system, which are built by AKO Polyot of Omsk, are analogs of the USAF Navstar Global Positioning System.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436 ; Spacewarn No. 564;National Space Science Data Center's 2000-063A ;
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Kosmos 2375
Spacecraft:  Uragan No. 87L
Chronologies: 2000 payload #97 ; 2000-063B ; 5894th spacecraft
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: Russian Defense ministry
Launch: 13 October 2000 at 14h12 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-2.
Orbit: 19,120 km x 19,120 km x 64.8°
Mission: Three Uragan ("Hurricane") navigation satellites for the GLONASS system, which are built by AKO Polyot of Omsk, are analogs of the USAF Navstar Global Positioning System.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436 ; Spacewarn No. 564 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-063B ;
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Kosmos 2376
Spacecraft: Uragan No. 88L
Chronologies: 2000 payload #98 ; 2000-063C ; 5895th spacecraft
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: Russian Defense ministry
Launch: 13 October 2000 at 14h12 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-2.
Orbit: 19,120 km x 19,120 km x 64.8°
Mission: Three Uragan ("Hurricane") navigation satellites for the GLONASS system, which are built by AKO Polyot of Omsk, are analogs of the USAF Navstar Global Positioning System.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436 ; Spacewarn No. 564 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-063C ;
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Progress M-43
Spacecraft:  Progress 7K-TGM No. 243
Chronologies: 2000 payload #99 ; 2000-064A ; 5896th spacecraft
Type: Cargo delivery to Mir
Sponsor: Rosaviakosmos / Russian Space Agency
Launch: 16 October 2000 at 21h27 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz-U.
Orbit: 331 km x 359 km x 51.7° x 91.4 min
Decayed: 29 January 2001
Mission: Progress M-43 is a Russian automatic cargo carrier that carries food and fuel for a probable crew that may enter Mir early 2001. It will raise Mir orbit, delaying reentry to preserve the option of a new MirCorp-financed flight next year. Progress M-43 docked with Mir on 20 October at 21h16 UTC, presumably at the Kvant docking port. To save fuel, a long 4-day rendezvous profile was used instead of the usual 2-day one. This slow docking enabled the cargo ship to conserve 150 kg of fuel that will be spent in raising Mir to a higher altitude from the currently perilous orbit. On 29 October, Mir was in a 329 km x 356 km x 51.6 deg orbit, after an apogee raising burn by Progress M-43.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 436 & 437 ; Spacewarn No. 564 & 567 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-064A ;
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DSCS III B-11 (USA 153)
Spacecraft:  Defense Satellite Communications System
Chronologies: 2000 payload #100 ; 2000-065A ; 5897th spacecraft
Type: Communications
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 20 October 2000 at 0h39 UTC, from Capel Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-36A, by an Atlas IIA (AC-140, IABS-8). 
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: DSCS III B-11 is an American military communications spacecraft part of the fleet of Defense Satellite Communications System. The communications will be in six channels covering the frequency band of 50-85 MHz. The DSCS III satellites were built by Lockheed Martin/Valley Forge.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 437 & 495 ; Spacewarn No. 564 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-065A ;
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Thuraya 1
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #101 ; 2000-066A ; 5898th spacecraft
Type: Communications (phone)
Sponsor: Abu Dhabi's Etisalat, the Emirates Telecom Corp
Launch: 21 October 2000 at 5h52 UTC, from the Odyssey platform, by a Zenit-3SL. 
Orbit: Geostationary at 44° East longitude
Mission: Thuraya 1 is a United Arab Emirate (UAE) communications spacecraft designed to handle thousands of voice, fax and data transmissions simultaneously from/to mobile telephones, via its 128-element phased array antenna of 12 meters x 16 meters dimension in the L-band. This first Boeing GEM satellite is built by Boeing/El Segundo (formerly Hughes).  The 3,200 kg (5,100 kg with fuel), 13 kW spacecraft is based on the HS-702 design but features a large 12-meter diameter truss antenna for L-band mobile telephone service. Launch mass of Thuraya is 5,108 kg; dry mass is probably around 3,000 kg. The satellite was delivered after on orbit testing to Etisalat, the Emirates Telecom Corp of Abu Dhabi, and its Thuraya Satellite subsidiary.
Launch: Thuraya was launched by a Boeing Sea Launch Zenit-3SL from the Odyssey platform in the Pacific Ocean at 154° West and 0° North.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 437 ; Spacewarn No. 564 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-066A ;
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GE 6
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #102 ; 2000-067A ; 5899th spacecraft
Type: Communications (DBS)
Sponsor: GE Americom'
Launch: 21 October 2000 at 22h00 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-3
Orbit: Geostationary at 83° West longitude.
Mission: GE 6 is a communications spacecraft that carries 24 C-band and 24 Ku-band transponders to provide direct-to-home voice, video and data transmission to America and the Caribbean countries. The Lockheed Martin A2100 series satellite has a mass of 3,552 kg at launch and 1,900 kg dry.
Launch: Another International Launch Services.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 437 ; Spacewarn No. 564 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-067A ;
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Europe*Star F1
Spacecraft:  Europe*Star FM1
Chronologies: 2000 payload #103 ; 2000-068A ; 5900th spacecraft
Type: Communications (DBS)
Sponsor: Europe*Star
Source : Europe*Star
Launch: 29 October 2000 at 5h59 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 44LP (V134).
Orbit: Geostationary at 45° East longitude
Mission: Europe*Star 1 is a European communications spacecraft that carries 30 Ku-band transponders to provide direct-to-home video, internet, and high speed data transmission among South Africa, Europe and the Indian subcontinent. The 4.2 tonne (with fuel) spacecraft is a Loral FS-1300 model with a launch mass of 4,167 kg and a dry mass of 1,717 kg; the satellite has two cruciform solar arrays. An Alcatel company, Europe*Star is headquartered in London.
Notes: It was the 100th successful launch by Ariane rockets, almost coinciding with the 100th launch of the American Shuttle mission.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 437 ; Spacewarn No. 564 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-068A ;
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Beidou 1
Spacecraft:  Beidou 1A
Beidou Navigation Test Satellite ("Beidou" is the Chinese for "Northern Dipper", equivalent to "Ursa Major".)
Chronologies: 2000 payload #104 ; 2000-069A ; 5901st spacecraft
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: China
Launch: 30 October 2000 at 16h02 UTC, from Xichang Space Launch Center's LC-1, by a Chang Zheng 3A.
Orbit: Geostationary at 140° East longitude.
Mission: Beidou is a Chinese test model of a navigational system satellite. China's first experimental navigation technology satellite was developed by CAST/Beijing. When completed, the Beidou Navigational System (BNS) will help to locate and navigate highway, railway and oceanic transportation. (Launch was at 0h02 Beijing time on 31 October, which corresponds to 16h02 UTC on 30 October.)
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 438 & 439 ; Spacewarn No. 564 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-069A ;
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Soyuz TM-31 / ISS-2R
Spacecraft: Soyuz 7K-STM No. 205
Chronologies: 2000 payload #105 ; 2000-070A ; 5902nd spacecraft
Type: Piloted spaceflight (to the International Space Station)
Sponsor: Rosaviakosmos / Russian Space Agency
Launch: 31 October 2000 at 7h53 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz-U.
Orbit: 374 km x 383 km x 51.6° x 92.2 min
Landed: 6 May 2001 at 5h41 UTC near Arkalyk in Kazakstan.
Mission: Soyuz TMA-1 is Russian passenger transportation spacecraft that carries the Expedition One crew to the International Space Station (ISS), the first of a decade-long "permanent inhabitation" of the Station. Soyuz TM-31 commander (komandir) is Yuriy Gidzenko, Flight engineer-1 (bortinzhener) is Sergey Krikalyov and Flight engineer-2 is Bill Shepherd of NASA. The two Russian and one American were to spend over three months in the ISS and return to Earth in in STS-102 in February 2001.
     Soyuz TM-31 flew from Pad 5, Area 1 at 5 GIK Baykonur and docks at Zvezda's rear port on 2 November 2000 at 9h21 UTC. The hatch to Zvezda was opened at 10h23 UTC. Once aboard ISS, Shepherd became the ISS Commander. In the initial days, the crew brings a variety of life support systems on-line and creates a lap-top computer network that to help run all systems in the ISS. The remaining months were allotted for exercise and space endurance practice.
    On 6 May 2001, Soyuz TM-31, carrying the first ISS visiting crew of Musabaev, Baturin and tourist Dennis Tito, undocked from Zvezda's -Y port at 2h21 UTC. The deorbit burn came at 4h47 UTC, followed by separation of the BO and PAO modules. The descent craft touched down near Arkalyk in Kazakstan at 5h41 UTC.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 438 & 452 ; Spacewarn No. 564 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-070A ;
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Navstar 45 (USA 154)
Spacecraft:  Navstar SVN 41 / GPS 2R-6
Chronologies: 2000 payload #106 ; 2000-071A ; 5903rd spacecraft
Type: Navigation
Families: 49th Navstar (6th second-generation replacement)
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Source: A. Parsch
Launch: 10 November 2000 at 17h14 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-17A, by a Delta 7925.
Orbit: 20,177 km x 20,498 km x 55.1° x 724.3 min 
Mission: Navstar 49 is a navigational satellite in the GPS fleet. This GPS SVN 41 is the sixth Block IIR navigation satellite which are built by Lockheed Martin.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 439 ; Spacewarn No. 565 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-071A ;
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PAS 1R / PanAmSat 1R
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #107 ; 2000-072A ; 5904th spacecraft
Type: Communications (DBS)
Sponsor: PanAmSat
Launch: 16 November 2000 at 1h07 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 (Ariane 507, V135).
Orbit: Geostationary at 45° West longitude
Mission: PAS 1R is a communications spacecraft that carries 36 C-band and 48 Ku-band transponders to provide direct-to-home (DTH) digital video and internet services to Europe and the Americas. The 1,200-kg, 15-kW spacecraft is a large Boeing Model 702 satellite with a dry mass of about 3,000 kg (launch mass 4,793 kg) and a solar panel span of 45 meters. PAS 1R is operated by Panamsat, whose fleet includes the former Hughes Galaxy system.
Launch: Ariane vehicle 507 flight V135 carries PAS 1R, STRV 1c/1d and AMSAT Phase 3D satellites. The EPS stage entered geostationary transfer orbit, followed by separation of the PAS 1R main payload. The two small STRV cubes were then ejected from the ASAP-5 secondary payload structure. At 1h49 UTC the SBS cylindrical adapter which connected PAS-1R to AMSAT was jettisoned; 50 seconds later AMSAT separated from the EPS.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 439 ; Spacewarn No. 565 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-072A ;
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P3D / AMSAT-OSCAR-40 (AO-40)
Spacecraft:  AMSAT Phase III-D
Chronologies: 2000 payload #108 ; 2000-072B ; 5905th spacecraft
Type: Communications (radio amateur)
Sponsor: German's AMSAT-DL (AMateur radio SATellites Dutchland)
Launch: 16 November 2000 at 1h07 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 (Ariane 507, V135).
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: Amsat P3D is an international amateur radio spacecraft, the largest amateur-support spacecraft, carrying 5 receivers and seven transmitters. Also carried on-board are some experimental instruments such as two cosmic ray monitors, two wide-angle cameras in the SCOPE unit available for the amateurs to command their images from locations of interest, a passive ionospheric "sounder" so as to derive the electron densities in the upper part of the ionosphere, and a GPS-receiver to locate the spacecraft position. 
     The long-delayed Phase 3D amateur radio satellite, built by AMSAT-DL (Germany), was renamed AMSAT-Oscar-40 (AO-40) once launched. The 400-kg, 250-W spacecraft carries an MBB S400 liquid engine (actually the backup engine for the Galileo Jupiter probe) as well as an ammonia arcjet thruster and a laser communications experiment. The satellite is the largest amateur satellite yet and the first to feature deployable solar panels. Mass is 397 kg dry.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 439 ; Spacewarn No. 565 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-072B ; A Brief History of Amateur Satellites ;
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STRV-1c
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #109 ; 2000-072C ; 5906th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: United Kingdom's DERA
Launch: 16 November 2000 at 1h07 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 (Ariane 507, V135).
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: STRV 1C and STRV 1D are two British microsatellites that carry technology-test devices such as lithium ion batteries, a new communications system that allows a high degree of security and a GPS receiver. The 100-kg spacecraft are small satellites built by the DERA (former Royal Aircraft Establishment), Farnborough, England. STRV-1c performs accelerated life testing of new components and materials in the high radiation environment of GTO.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 439 ; Spacewarn No. 565 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-072C ;
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STRV-1d
Spacecraft:  S97-2
Chronologies: 2000 payload #110 ; 2000-072D ; 5907th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: United Kingdom NRL
Launch: 16 November 2000 at 1h07 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 (Ariane 507, V135).
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: STRV 1C and STRV 1D are two British microsatellites that carry technology-test devices such as lithium ion batteries, a new communications system that allows a high degree of security and a GPS receiver. The 100-kg spacecraft are small satellites built by the DERA (former Royal Aircraft Establishment), Farnborough, England. STRV-1d carries an NRL Space Test Program experiment (S97-2), a camera, and technology and computer experiments.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 439 ; Spacewarn No. 565 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-072D ;
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Progress M1-4 / ISS-2P
Spacecraft:  Progress M1 11F615A55 (7K-TGM)  No. 253
Chronologies: 2000 payload #111 ; 2000-073A ; 5908th spacecraft
Type: Cargo delivery (to the International Space Station)
Sponsor: Rosaviakosmos / Russian Space Agency
Launch: 16 November 2000 at 1h32 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz-U.
Orbit: ~400 km x 51.6°
Deorbit: 8 February 2001 at 13h50 UTC over the Pacific. 
Mission: Progress M1-4 is a Russian automatic cargo delivery spacecraft that carries 1.8 tonnes of material, food, water, clothes and other necessities for the three-man crew now in the International Space Stations (ISS). 
    The cargo craft made rendezvous with the Station on 18 November. After problems with the automatic system, Gidzenko took over manual control with the remote TORU system at 3h02 UTC. After one failed attempt when M1-4 got to only 5 meters from docking at 3h09 UTC, docking was successfully achieved at 3h48 UTC at Zarya's nadir port. The problem with the TORU system is that the TV camera on the Progress, which Gidzenko uses to steer the vehicle with, is not that great and tends to ice up quickly when the Progress is in shadow. 
     Progress M1-4 undocked from ISS's Zarya nadir port on 1st December 2000 at 16h23 UTC. The vehicle remains in orbit. It then redocked to Zarya's nadir port on 26 December 2000 at 10h54 UTC. The redocking testing out a fix to software that caused problems in the vehicle's first docking attempt on 18 November. Expedition One Pilot Yuriy Gidzenko completed the docking manually using the remote control TORU system.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 439, 440, 442 & 446 ; Spacewarn No. 565 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-073A ;
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QuickBird 1
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #112 ; 2000-074A ; 5909th spacecraft
Type: Earth remote sensing
Sponsor: EarthWatch Inc.
Launch: 20 November 2000 at 23h00 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-132, by a Kosmos-3M.
Orbit: 81 km x 614 km x 65.8°
Decayed: 21 November 2000 at 0h15 UTC
Mission: Quickbird 1 is an American remote-sensing and imaging spacecraft. The spacecraft could not be sighted or commanded after the first orbit. A report has it that the second stage did not complete its burn, or that the nose cone may not have been ejected. It re-entered the atmosphere on the next day.
     QuickBird 1 was a 1-meter resolution imaging satellite using a Ball Aerospace BCP-2000 bus. It was 3.0-meter high and 1.6-meter x 1.6-meter in cross-section with a 5.2-meter solar array span; mass was 931 kg full and 899 kg dry (the satellite had four 4.4N hydrazine thrusters). It was the second use of the Ball Aerospace BCP-2000 satellite; NASA's QuikScat, launched in Jun 1999, continues to operate. 
     The Kosmos-3M second stage placed QuickBird 1 in a 81 x 614 km x 65.8 deg orbit but apparently failed to restart at apogee, and reentered at the next perigee over South America. This failure is a heavy blow to EarthWatch Inc. whose other satellite, EarlyBird, failed after a few days in orbit in December 1997. EarthWatch's rival, SpaceImaging, lost one satellite too but its second Ikonos is operating in orbit. Visual observations from Uruguay of reentering debris suggest that QB-1 reentered at around 0h15 UTC on 21 November. The last Kosmos-3M failure, in 1995, had a similar profile and was attributed to contamination in the oxidizer lines for the  second stage main engine  QuickBird 2 is under construction. .
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 439 & 440 ; Spacewarn No. 565 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-074A ;
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EO-1 / Earth Observing 1
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #113 ; 2000-075A ; 5910th spacecraft
Type: Technology/Earth remote sensing
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 21 November 2000 at 18h24 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-2W, by a Delta 7320.
Orbit: 682 km x 729 km x 98.2°
Mission: The Earth Observing mission 1 is the first spacecraft in the American New Millennium Program (NMP). The 573-kg satellite carries three well-developed instruments (and seven technology-test items) to image Earth's surface in numerous wavelength bands. The spacecraft is a NASA-Goddard spacecraft which demonstrates technology for the next generation Landsat for NASA's New Millenium Program (complementing the New Millenium's Deep Space series). It flies in formation with Landsat 7 for comparisons, using a hydrazine thruster to adjust its orbit. The satellite uses a MIDEX-derived bus built by Swales Aerospace; dry mass is 566 kg. The main instruments are ALI (Advanced Land Imager) and the Hyperion 220-band imaging spectrometer.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 439 ; Spacewarn No. 565 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-075A ;
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SAC-C
Spacecraft:  Satelite de Aplicaciones Cientificas C
Chronologies: 2000 payload #114 ; 2000-075B ; 5911th spacecraft
Type: Earth remote sensing
Sponsor: CONAE / Argentine space agency (+ other countries)
Launch: 21 November 2000 at 18h24 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-2W, by a Delta 7320.
Orbit: 687 km x 707 km x 98.3° 
Mission: SAC-C is an International (Argentina plus USA, France, Italy, Denmark and Brazil) satellite. Its mission is to remotely-sense vegetation, wetlands, and ecosystem in four wavelength bands with a spatial resolution of 1 km. The orbital planes of SAC-C, EO 1, Landsat 7 and Terra are closely coplanar, with a given site being successively visited by each spacecraft within an hour of each other. SAC-C was developed by the Argentine space agency CONAE and built by the Argentine company INVAP. The 467 kg satellite carries a battery of earth observing instruments and will focus on Argentine forestry and agriculture studies. SAC-C carries a NASA experiment which uses the distortion of GPS signals observed near the horizon to derive atmospheric conditions.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 439 ; Spacewarn No. 565 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-075A ;
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Munin
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #115 ; 2000-075C ; 5912th spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: Sweden's IRF / Insitute for Space Physics
Launch: 21 November 2000 at 18h24 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-2W, by a Delta 7320.
Orbit: 693 km x 1,794 km x 95.4° x 110 min.
Mission: Munin is a Swedish auroral research nanosatellite that carries a combined electron-ion spectrometer and a solid state detector for high energy particles. Also on-board is a miniature CCD camera to image auroras. Only the interesting data over auroral passes will be captured, compressed and stored in a 2 MB memory for downloading during Kiruna (Sweden) passes. The 6-kg, cubical spacecraft with solar cells covering all sides was built by Swedish students in collaboration with the Swedish Insitute for Space Physics (IRF).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 439 ; Spacewarn No. 565 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-075C ;
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Anik F-1
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #116 ; 2000-076A ; 5913th spacecraft
Type: Communications (DBD)
Sponsor: Telesat Canada
Launch: 21 November 2000 at 23h56 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 44L. 
Orbit: Geostationary at 107.3° West longitude
Mission: Anik F1 is a Canadian communications spacecraft that carries 36 C-band and 48 Ku-band transponders to provide direct-to-home (DTH) digital telecommunications to all locations in Canada, USA and the Caribbean. The 4.7-tonne (with fuel), 17.5-kW spacecraft is a Boeing model 702 satellite. Launch mass is 4,852 kg and dry mass is 2,950 kg. Telesat Canada became the first domestic comsat operator with the launch of Anik A1 in 1972.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 439 ; Spacewarn No. 565 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-076A ;
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Sirius 3 / SD-RADIO 3
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #117 ; 2000-077A ; 5914th spacecraft
Type: Commuinications (radio broacasting)
Sponsor: U.S. Digital Audio Radio Satellite
Launch: 30 November 2000 at 19h59 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81L, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-3.
Orbit: 24,388 km x 47,097 km x 63.3° x 24 hr 
Mission: Sirius 3 carries 100 channels in the 2.320-2.325 GHz band to relay music, news and entertainment directly to motorists in America. There are also 90 dedicated ground-based relay stations in dense urban areas that will rebroadcast the signals. The 3.9-tonne satellite is a Loral FS-1300 series vehicle. This launch completes the planned fleet of three satellites which will become operational in January 2001. Reception requires installation of a special radio, or purchase of one of the upscale automobiles pre-equipped with the receiver.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 440 ; Spacewarn No. 565 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-077A ;
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STS-97 / ISS-4A
Spacecraft:  Space Shutle #101 ; Endeavour (15th flight)
Chronologies: 2000 payload #118 ; 2000-078A ; 5915th spacecraft
Type: Piloted spaceflight (to the International Space Station)
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 1st December 2000 at 3h06 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit: circular at ~400 km x 51.6°
Landed: 11 December 2000 at 23h03 UTC
Mission: STS 97 main mission was to install the double-wing ITS-P6 solar panel on the International Space Station. This truss element was installed on the +Z end of the Z1 truss (and later it will be moved to the end of the port truss). (Note: the previously docked Progress M1-4 cargo spacecraft had to be temporarily evicted from the ISS before the installation.) It required several spacewalks by the crew to extend the panel taut enough.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 439 & 440 ; Spacewarn No. 566 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-078A ;
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ITS-P6
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #119 ; n/a  ; 5916th spacecraft
Type: International Space Station component
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 1st December 2000 at 3h06 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit: Circular at ~400 km x 51.6°
Mission: ITS-P6 consists of a solar array wing, an Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) section with a thermal radiator for the solar wing, and the Long Spacer (LS) truss segment with two thermal radiators for the Destiny module (which will follow on a later flight). It is a 72-meter x 11.4-meter, 65 kW double-wing solar panel and, including the support beams, radiators and batteries, it has a mass of 15.75 tonnes.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 439&440 ; Spacewarn No. 566 ;
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EROS A1
Spacecraft:  Earth Resources Observation Satellite
Chronologies: 2000 payload #120 ; 2000-079A ; 5917th spacecraft
Type: Earth remote sensing
Sponsor: Israel's ImageSat
Launch: 5 December 2000 at 12h32 UTC, from Svobodniy, by a Start-1.
Orbit: 491 km x 506 km x 97.3° x 94.6 min Sun-synchronous 
Mission: EROS A1 is an Israeli commercial imaging satellite. The 250-kg (dry mass) triaxially stabilized spacecraft carries a black and white high resolution (1.8 meter) CCD camera to obtain images (with terrain width of 12.6 km) of locations chosen by Israeli military or world-wide commercial clients, and downlink them at one of the 14 ground stations. The spacecraft is owned by ImageSat (an Israeli-led company registered in the Netherlands Antilles) and built by IAI using the Ofeq-3 design.
Launch The satellites was launched by a Start-1 (modified Topol' ICBM) rocket from the Russian Far Eastern spaceport 2-GIK at Svobodniy. This is the third launch from this new launch site in Siberia. The START 1 rocket is a modified RS-12M Topol ICBM, also known in NATO as SS-25.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 440 ; Spacewarn No. 566 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-079A ;
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NRO "Great Bear" (USA 155)
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #121 ; 2000-080A ; 5918th spacecraft
Type: Communications (data relay satellite) and/or Signal intelligence
Sponsor: U.S. National Reconnaissance Office
Launch: 6 December 2000 at 2h47 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-36A, by an Atlas IIAS. 
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: A classified National Reconnaissance Office payload which is probably either a data relay satellite (to transfers spy satellite imagery to the ground) or a signals intelligence satellite. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 440 ; Spacewarn No. 566 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-080A ;
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Astra 2D
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #122 ; 2000-081A ; 5919th spacecraft
Type: Communications (DBS)
Sponsor: Luxembourg-based SES / Société européenne de satellites 
Launch: 20 December 2000 at 0h26 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5G (Ariane508, V138). 
Orbit: Geostationary at 28.2° East longitude
Mission: Astra 2D is a communications spacecraft that carries 16 Ku-band transponders to provide direct-to-home voice, video and data transmissions to Britain and neighboring countries. The 825-kg (dry mass) satellite is a Boeing 376HP spin-stabilized satellite with a dry mass of around 700 kg.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 442 ; Spacewarn No. 566 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-081A ;
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GE 8 / Aurora III
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #123 ; 2000-081B ; 5920th spacecraft
Type: Communications (multi-service)
Sponsor: GE Americom and AT&T Alascom for Alaskan communications
Launch: 20 December 2000 at 0h26 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5G (Ariane 508, V138).
Orbit: Geostationary at 139° West longitude
Mission: GE 8 is a communications spacecraft that carries 24 C-band transponders to provide voice, video and broadband data communications to the contiguous USA, Alaska and the Caribbean. The spacecraft is a Lockheed Martin A2100A with a launch mass of 2,015 kg and a dry mass of 919 kg. Americom and Alascom were originally both RCA subsidiaries, and in the satellite communications game, Alascom has continued to use the Americom network; GE operates the satellite.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 442 ; Spacewarn No. 566 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-081B ;
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LDREX
Spacecraft:  Large-scale Deployable Reflector EXperiment
Chronologies: 2000 payload #124 ; 2000-081C ; 5921st spacecraft
Type: Technology
Sponsor: NASDA
Launch: 20 December 2000 at 0h26 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5G (Ariane 508, V138).
Orbit:
Mission: LDREX is a Japanese experimental antenna dish. The reflector was to stay expanded to a diameter of 6 meters for about 20 minutes after sliding out of a tubular container on the rocket. An on-board camera was to image and downlink the deployment process. The Ariane 508's EPS upper stage carried an ASAP5 small payload attachment ring with a special camera system and the LDREX experimental antenna for Japan's NASDA space agency. It was to deployed to test the deployment mechanism for the larger antenna to be used on the ETS-8 satellite. After the test the antenna was jettisoned.
    The LDREX experiment was a failure; it was designed to determine whether the deployment mechanism (planned for the ETS-8 satellite) worked, and it indeed returned lots of information on that subject, which hopefully will lead to a successful ETS-8 mission in the future. (If the video camera or telemetry hadn't functioned, LDREX would have been a failure, but problems with the antenna deployment were what LDREX was designed to measure and don't per se make it a failure).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 442 & 445 ; Spacewarn No. 566 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-081C ;
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Beidou 2
Spacecraft:  Beidou 1B
Beidou Navigation Test Satellite
Chronologies: 2000 payload #125 ; 2000-082A ; 5922nd spacecraft
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: China
Launch: 20 December 2000 at 16h20 UTC, from Xichang Space Launch Center's LC-2, by a Chang Zheng-3A.
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: Beidou 1B is the second Chinese navigational spacecraft that completes the two-satellite navigational system which will provide positional information for highway, railway and marine transportation. The Beidou satellite is based on the DFH-3 comsat and has a mass of around 2,200 kg including its FY-25 solid apogee motor.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 442 ; Spacewarn No. 566 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2000-082A ;
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Gonets D1-7
Spacecraft:  Gonets-D1 No. 7
Chronologies: 2000 payload #126 ; 2000 3rd loss ; 5923rd spacecraft
Type: Communications (civilian)
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 27 December 2000 at 18h56 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsiklon-3 (11K68).
Orbit: n/a
Mission: Six small communications satellites were destroyed in a launch failure. The payload is believed to have been three Strela-3 military commsats and three Gonets D-1 sats (the civilian version of Strela-3). These small cylindrical satellites were designed by NPO PM and are built by AO Polyot; they were intended for a 1,400 km circular orbit inclined at 83 degrees. 
Launch: The 11K68 Tsiklon-3 rocket took off from Plesetsk, but the S5M third stage failed and the vehicle crashed a few thousand kilometers downrange near Wrangel Island. The impact zone in the East Siberian Sea suggests that the failure happened during the first burn, at an altitude between 170 and 200 km, rather than a second burn failure in which the vehicle would have completed one orbit. The last launch failure of a Tsiklon-3 was in 1994. This was the fourth launch failure of the year, following a Zenit-3SL, a Mu-V and a Kosmos-3M.2
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 442 ;
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Gonets D1-8 
Spacecraft:  Gonets-D1 No. 8
Chronologies: 2000 payload #127 ; 2000 4th loss ; 5924th spacecraft
Type: Communications (civilian)
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 27 December 2000 at 18h56 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsiklon-3.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: Six small communications satellites were destroyed in a launch failure. The payload is believed to have been three Strela-3 military commsats and three Gonets D-1 sats (the civilian version of Strela-3). These small cylindrical satellites were designed by NPO PM and are built by AO Polyot; they were intended for a 1,400 km circular orbit inclined at 83 degrees. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 442 ;
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Gonets D1-9
Spacecraft: Gonets-D1 No. 9
Chronologies: 2000 payload #128 ; 2000 5th loss ; 5925th spacecraft
Type: Communications (civilian)
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 27 December 2000 at 18h56 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsiklon-3.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: Six small communications satellites were destroyed in a launch failure. The payload is believed to have been three Strela-3 military commsats and three Gonets D-1 sats (the civilian version of Strela-3). These small cylindrical satellites were designed by NPO PM and are built by AO Polyot; they were intended for a 1,400 km circular orbit inclined at 83 degrees. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 442 ;
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Strela-3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2000 payload #129 ; 2000 6th loss ; 5926th spacecraft
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russian Defense ministry
Launch: 27 December 2000 at 18h56 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsiklon-3.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: Six small communications satellites were destroyed in a launch failure. The payload is believed to have been three Strela-3 military commsats and three Gonets D-1 sats (the civilian version of Strela-3). These small cylindrical satellites were designed by NPO PM and are built by AO Polyot; they were intended for a 1,400 km circular orbit inclined at 83 degrees. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 442 ;
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Strela-3
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #130 ; 2000 7th loss ; 5927th spacecraft
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russian Defense ministry
Launch: 27 December 2000 at 18h56 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsiklon-3.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: Six small communications satellites were destroyed in a launch failure. The payload is believed to have been three Strela-3 military commsats and three Gonets D-1 sats (the civilian version of Strela-3). These small cylindrical satellites were designed by NPO PM and are built by AO Polyot; they were intended for a 1,400 km circular orbit inclined at 83 degrees. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 442 ;
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Strela-3
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2000 payload #131 ; 2000 8th loss ; 5928th spacecraft
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russian Defense ministry
Launch: 27 December 2000 at 18h56 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsiklon-3.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: Six small communications satellites were destroyed in a launch failure. The payload is believed to have been three Strela-3 military commsats and three Gonets D-1 sats (the civilian version of Strela-3). These small cylindrical satellites were designed by NPO PM and are built by AO Polyot; they were intended for a 1,400 km circular orbit inclined at 83 degrees. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 442 ;

Home 1993 Summary
1992 spacecrafts 1994 spacecrafts
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The 118 spacecrafts launched in 1993 :
1) Kosmos 2230 / Tsikada 2) Molniya 1-85 3) STS-54 4) TDRS 6
5) Kosmos 2231 / Yantar-4K2 66 6) Soyuz TM-16 7) Kosmos 2232 / Oko 72 8) Navstar 2-18 (USA 88)
9) Kosmos 2233 / Parus 10) OXP 1 / Orbcomm CDS 11) SCD-1 12) Kosmos 2234 / Glonass (Uragan) 73L
13) Kosmos 2235 / Glonass (Uragan) 59L 14) Kosmos 2236 / Glonass (Uragan) 57L 15) Astro D / ASCA Asuka 16) Progress M-16
17) Raduga 29 18) EKA-1 (Start-1) 19) UFO F1 20) Kosmos 2237 / Tselina-2
21) Navstar 2-19 (USA 90) 22) SEDS 1 23) Kosmos 2238 / US-P / US-PM 1 24) Progress M-17
25) Kosmos 2239 / Parus 26) Kosmos 2240 / Yantar-4K2 67 27) Kosmos 2241 / Oko 73 28) STS-56 - Atlas-2
29) Spartan 201 30) Kosmos 2242 / Tselina-R / Tselina-D 73 31) Molniya 3-44 32) Alexis
33) Orbcomm OXP-2 34) STS-55 -  Spacelab-D2 35) Kosmos 2243 / Yantar-1KFT 16 36) Kosmos 2244 / US-P / US-PM 2
37) Kosmos 2245 / Strela-3 38) Kosmos 2246 / Strela-3 39) Kosmos 2247 / Strela-3 40) Kosmos 2248 / Strela-3
41) Kosmos 2249 / Strela-3 42) Kosmos 2250 / Strela-3 43) Astra 1C 44) Arsene-OSCAR 29
45) Navstar 2-20 /  (USA 91) 46) Resurs F-17 47) Progress M-18 48) Molniya 1-86
49) Gorizont 50) Kosmos 2251 / Strela-2 51) STS-57 52) Kosmos 2252 / Strela-3
53) Kosmos 2253 / Strela-3 54) Kosmos 2254 / Strela-3 55) Kosmos 2255 / Strela-3 56) Kosmos 2256 / Strela-3
57) Kosmos 2257 / Strela-3 58) HGS-4 (Galaxy 4H) 59) Resurs F-18 60) Radcal
61) Navstar 2-21 (USA 92) 62) SEDS 2 (PMG-PDP) 63) Soyuz TM-17 64) Kosmos 2258 / US-P / US-PM 3
65) Kosmos 2259 / Yantar-4K2 68 66) DSCS III B-9 (USA 94) 67) Kosmos 2260 / Zenit-8 / Oblik 68) Hispasat 1B
69) Insat 2B 70) NOSS 19 / SLDCOM 3 71) SSU 72) SSU
73) SSU 74) TLD 75) Molniya 3-45 76) NOAA 13
77) Kosmos 2261 / Oko 74 78) Progress M-19 79) Resurs F-19 80) Navstar 2-22 (USA 94)
81) Meteor 2-21 82) Temisat 83) UFO F2 (USA 95) 84) Kosmos 2262 / Don (5) / Orlets-1 5
85) STS-51 86) ACTS 87) ORFEUS-SPAS 88) Kosmos 2263 / Tselina-2
89) Kosmos 2264 / US-P / US-PM 4 90) IRS-1E 91) SPOT 3 92) STELLA
93) Eyesat 1 / AMRAD-Oscar-27 94) Healthsat 1 95) ITAMsat / Italy-OSCAR 26(IO-26) 96) Uribyol 2 / KITSAT-OSCAR 25 (KO-25)
97) PoSAT 1 / PoSAT-OSCAR 28 98) Raduga 30 99) Landsat 6 100) FSW 1-14 / Jian Bing 
101) Progress M-20 102) STS-58 - SLS-2 103) Intelsat 701 104) Kosmos 2265 / Taifun-1B
105) Navstar 2-23 (USA 96) 106) Gorizont 28 107) Kosmos 2266 / Parus 108) Kosmos 2267 / Yantar-4KS1
109) Gorizont 29 / Rimsat  110) Solidaridad 1 (Satmex 3) 111) Meteosat 6 / MOP 3 112) DSCS III B-10 (USA 97)
113) STS-61 114) NATO IVB (USA 98) 115) Telstar 401 116) DBS 1 / DirecTV 1
117) Thaicom 1 118) Molniya 1-87
..
Spacecraft Entries
.
Kosmos 2230
Spacecraft:  Tsikada
Numbers: 1993 payload #1 ; 1993-001A ; 4861st spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 12 January 1992 at 11h02 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by a Kosmos C-1 (11K65M 53778-426).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Molniya 1-85
Spacecraft:  Molniya-1T
Numbers: 1993 payload #2 ; 1993-002A ; 4862nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 13 January 1993 at 1h55 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/3, by an A-2-e/"Molniya" (8K78M / ML).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
STS-54
Spacecraft:  Endeavour
Numbers: 1993 payload #3 ; 1993-003A ; 4863rd spacecraft.
Type: Piloted spacecraft
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 13 January 1992 at 13h55 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-39B, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
TDRS 6
Spacecraft:  TDRS F
Numbers: 1993 payload #4 ; 1993-003B ; 4864th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (data relay)
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 13 January 1992 at 13h55 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-39B, by the Space Shuttle. Deployed from Endeavour cargo bay on 13 January 1993.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2231
Spacecraft:  Yantar-4K2 no. 66 / Kobal't
Numbers: 1993 payload #5 ; 1993-004A ; 4865th spacecraft.
Type: Reconnaissance
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 19 January 1993 at 14h52 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/3, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Soyuz TM-16
Spacecraft:  Soyuz 7K-STM No. 101
Numbers: 1993 payload #6 ; 1993-005A ; 4866th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted spacecraft
Sponsor: Russia (Korolev's Design Bureau)
Launch: 24 January 1992 at 5h58 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U2).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2232
Spacecraft:  Oko #72
Numbers: 1993 payload #7 ; 1993-006A ; 4867th spacecraft.
Type: Missille early warning
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 26 January 1992 at 14h24 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-16/2, by an A-2-e/"Molniya" (8K78M / 2BL).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Navstar 2-18 (USA 88)
Spacecraft:  Navstar SVN 22 / · Navstar 2A-09 / Navstar BIIA-18
Numbers: 1993 payload #8 ; 1993-007A ; 4868th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force
Launch: 3 February 1993 at 2h55 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-17A, by a Delta 7925 (218).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2233
Spacecraft:  Parus
Numbers: 1993 payload #9 ; 1993-008A ; 4869th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 9 February 1993 at 2h52 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by a Kosmos C-1 (11K65M 47178-428).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
OXP 1 / Orbcomm CDS
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #10 ; 1993-009A ; 4870th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: U.S.' Orbital Communications Corp.
Launch: 9 February 1993 at 14h24 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's RW-15/33, by a Pegasus (003/F3).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
SCD-1
Spacecraft:  Data Collection Satellite 1
Numbers: 1993 payload #11 ; 1993-009B ; 4871th spacecraft.
Type: Environmental data relay
Sponsor: Brazil
Launch: 9 February 1993 at 14h24 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's RW-15/33, by a Pegasus (003/F3).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; SpacewarnNo.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2234
Spacecraft:  Glonass s/n 73L / Uragan No. 73L
Numbers: 1993 payload #12 ; 1993-010A ; 4872nd spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 17 February 1993 at 20h09 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/23, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-2 (8K82K 362-01 / 11S861 66L).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2235
Spacecraft:  Glonass s/n 59L / Uragan No. 59L
Numbers: 1993 payload #13 ; 1993-010B ; 4873rd spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 17 February 1993 at 20h09 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/23, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-2 (8K82K 362-01 / 11S861 66L).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2236
Spacecraft:  Glonass s/n 57L / Uragan No. 57L
Numbers: 1993 payload #14 ; 1993-010C ; 4874th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 17 February 1993 at 20h09 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/23, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-2 (8K82K 362-01 / 11S861 66L).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Astro D / ASCA Asuka 
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #15 ; 1993-011A ; 4875th spacecraft.
Type: X-ray astronomy
Sponsor: Japan
Launch: 20 February 1993 at 2h24 UTC, from Kagoshima Space Center's M1, by a Mu-3S-II (M-3S2-7).
Orbit:
Decayed: 2 March 2001
Mission: The Japanese Asuka (ASTRO D, ASCA) satellite operated from February 1993 to July 2000 and made observations of the hard X-ray sky with CCD imagers and a foil-type set of X-ray telescopes.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 448  ; Spacewarn No. 569 ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log
.
Progress M-16
Spacecraft:  Progress 7K-TGM No. 216
Numbers: 1993 payload #16 ; 1993-012A ; 4876th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to Mir
Sponsor: Russia (Korolev's Design Bureau)
Launch: 21 February 1993 at 18h28 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U2 U15000-068).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Raduga 29
Spacecraft:  Gran' No. 42L
Numbers: 1993 payload #17 ; 1993-013A ; 4877th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 25 March 1993 at 2h28 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/23, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-2 (8K82K 358-01 / 11S861 67L).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
EKA-1 (Start-1)
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #18 ; 1993-014A ; 4878th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 25 March 1993 at 13h26 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-158, by a Start-1.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
UFO F1
Spacecraft:  UHF F/O F1 ; Ultra High Frequency Follow On
Numbers: 1993 payload #19 ; 1993-015A ; 4879th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: U.S. Navy
Launch: 25 March 1993 at 21h36 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-36B, by an Atlas I (AC-74 / Centaur I 5054).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2237
Spacecraft:  Tselina-2
Numbers: 1993 payload #20 ; 1993-016A ; 4880th spacecraft.
Type: Electronic intelligence
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 26 March 1993 at 2h24 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-45/1, by a J-1/Zenit-2.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Navstar 2-19 (USA 90)
Spacecraft:  Navstar SVN 31 / Navstar 2A-10 / Navstar BIIA-19
Numbers: 1993 payload #21 ; 1993-017A ; 4881st spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force
Launch: 30 March 1993 at 3h09 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-17A, by a Delta 7925 (219).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
SEDS 1
Spacecraft:  Small Expendable-tether Deployer
Numbers: 1993 payload #22 ; 1993-017B ; 4882nd spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force
Launch: 30 March 1993 at 3h09 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-17A, by a Delta 7925 (219).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2238
Spacecraft:  US-P / US-PM s/n 1
Numbers: 1993 payload #23 ; 1993-018A ; 4883rd spacecraft.
Type: Ocean surveillance ("RORSAT")
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 30 March 1993 at 12h00 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-90, by a F-1/Tsyklon 2.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Progress M-17
Spacecraft:  Progress 7K-TGM No. 217
Numbers: 1993 payload #24 ; 1993-019A ; 4884th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to Mir
Sponsor: Russia (Korolev's Design Bureau)
Launch: 31 March 1993 at 3h36 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U2 N15000-069).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2239
Spacecraft:  Parus
Numbers: 1993 payload #25 ; 1993-020A ; 4885th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 1st April 1993 at 18h57 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by a Kosmos C-1 (11K65M 47178-431).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2240
Spacecraft:  Yantar-4K2 no. 67 / Kobal't
Numbers: 1993 payload #26 ; 1993-021A ; 4886th spacecraft.
Type: Reconnaissance
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 2 April 1993 at 14h09 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-16/2, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2241
Spacecraft:  Oko #73
Numbers: 1993 payload #27 ; 1993-022A ; 4887th spacecraft.
Type: Missille early warning
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 6 April 1993 at 19h12 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/4, by an A-2-e/"Molniya" (8K78M / 2BL).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
STS-56 - Atlas-2 
Spacecraft:  Discovery
Numbers: 1993 payload #28 ; 1993-023A ; 4888th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted spacecraft
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 8 April 1993 at 5h29 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-39B, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Spartan 201
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #29 ; 1993-023B ; 4889th spacecraft.
Type: Astronomy
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 8 April 1993 at 5h29 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-39B, by the Space Shuttle. Deployed from Discovery cargo bay on 11 April 1993.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2242
Spacecraft:  Tselina-R / Tselina-D no. 73
Numbers: 1993 payload #30 ; 1993-024A ; 4890th spacecraft.
Type: Electronic intelligence
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 16 April 1993 at 7h55 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Molniya 3-44
Spacecraft:  Molniya-3 No. 57
Numbers: 1993 payload #31 ; 1993-025A ; 4891st spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 21 April 1993 at 0h28 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/4, by an A-2-e/"Molniya" (8K78M / ML).
Orbit:
Decayed: 25 January 2004
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No. 603 ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Alexis
Spacecraft: P89-1B
Numbers: 1993 payload #32 ; 1993-026A ; 4892nd spacecraft.
Type: Astronomy
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force
Launch: 25 April 1993 at 13h56 UTC, from Edwards Air Force Base's RW-04/22, by a Pegasus (004/F4).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Orbcomm OXP-2
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #33 ; 1993-026B ; 4893rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: U.S.' Orbital Communications Corp.
Launch: 25 April 1993 at 13h56 UTC, from Edwards Air Force Base's RW-04/22, by a Pegasus (004/F4).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
STS-55 -  Spacelab-D2
Spacecraft:  Columbia
Numbers: 1993 payload #34 ; 1993-027A ; 4894th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted spacecraft
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 25 April 1993 at 14h50 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2243
Spacecraft:  Yantar-1KFT no. 16 / Kometa No. 16
Numbers: 1993 payload #35 ; 1993-028A ; 4895th spacecraft.
Type: Reconnaissance
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 27 April 1993 at 12h28 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2244
Spacecraft:  US-P / US-PM s/n 2
Numbers: 1993 payload #36 ; 1993-029A ; 4896th spacecraft.
Type: Ocean surveillance ("RORSAT")
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 28 April 1993 at 3h36 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-90, by a F-1/Tsyklon 2.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2245
Spacecraft:  Strela-3
Numbers: 1993 payload #37 ; 1993-030A ; 4897th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (store/dump)
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 11 May 1993 at 14h52 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2246
Spacecraft:  Strela-3
Numbers: 1993 payload #38 ; 1993-030B ; 4898th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (store/dump)
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 11 May 1993 at 14h52 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2247
Spacecraft:  Strela-3
Numbers: 1993 payload #39 ; 1993-030C ; 4899th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (store/dump)
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 11 May 1993 at 14h52 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2248
Spacecraft: Strela-3
Numbers: 1993 payload #40 ; 1993-030D ; 4900th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (store/dump)
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 11 May 1993 at 14h52 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2249
Spacecraft:  Strela-3
Numbers: 1993 payload #41 ; 1993-030E ; 4901st spacecraft.
Type: Communications (store/dump)
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 11 May 1993 at 14h52 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2250
Spacecraft:  Strela-3
Numbers: 1993 payload #42 ; 1993-030F ; 4902nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications (store/dump)
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 11 May 1993 at 14h52 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Astra 1C
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #43 ; 1993-031A ; 4903rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Société Europíenne des Satellites
Launch: 12 May 1993 at 0h57 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 42L (V56).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Arsene-OSCAR 29
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #44 ; 1993-031B ; 4904th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (radio-amateur)
Sponsor: Club de l'Espace
Launch: 12 May 1993 at 0h57 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 42L (V56).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission: Arsene-OSCAR 24 was a French packet relay satellite built by French Radio Amateur Club de l'Espace. The packet system was never implemented because the 2 meter transponder failed soon after launch. Arsene was then used to relay SSB and CW signals on 2.4 GHz for several months until this transponder failed as well.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ; A Brief History of Amateur Satellites ;
.
Navstar 2-20 (USA 91)
Spacecraft:  Navstar SVN 37 / Navstar BIIA-20 (GPS)
Numbers: 1993 payload #45 ; 1993-032A ; 4905th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force
Launch: 13 May 1993 at 0h07 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-17A, by a Delta 7925 (220).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Resurs F-17
Spacecraft:  Resurs-F2 17F42 No. 9
Numbers: 1993 payload #46 ; 1993-033A ; 4906th spacecraft.
Type: Earth remote sensing
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 21 May 1993 at 9h21 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-16/2, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Progress M-18
Spacecraft:  Progress 7K-TGM No. 218
Numbers: 1993 payload #47 ; 1993-034A ; 4907th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to Mir
Sponsor: Russia (Korolev's Design Bureau)
Launch: 22 May 1993 at 6h43 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U2).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Molniya 1-86
Spacecraft:  Molniya-1T No. 81
Numbers: 1993 payload #48 ; 1993-035A ; 4908th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 26 May 1993 at 3h36 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/4, by an A-2-e/"Molniya" (8K78M / ML).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Gorizont
Spacecraft:  Gorizont No. 39L
Numbers: 1993 payload #49 ; 1993 1st loss ; 4909th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 27 May 1993 at 1h21 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/23, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-2 (8K82K 364-02 / 11S861 69).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2251
Spacecraft:  Strela-2
Numbers: 1993 payload #50 ; 1993-036A ; 4910th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (store/dump)
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 16 June 1993 at 4h19 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-132/1, by a Kosmos C-1 (11K65M 47135-601).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission: Kosmos 2251 collided with Iridium 33 on 10 February 2009 at at 16h56 UTC. It was a Strela-2M communication satellite that stopped operations in 1995.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ; RSNF's 11 Feb 09 ;
.
STS-57
Spacecraft:  Endeavour
Numbers: 1993 payload #51 ; 1993-037A ; 4911th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted spacecraft
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 21 June 1993 at 13h07 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-39B, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2252
Spacecraft:  Strela-3
Numbers: 1993 payload #52 ; 1993-038A ; 4912th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (store/dump)
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 24 June 1993 at 4h48 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2253
Spacecraft:  Strela-3
Numbers: 1993 payload #53 ; 1993-038B ; 4913th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (store/dump)
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 24 June 1993 at 4h48 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2254
Spacecraft: Strela-3
Numbers: 1993 payload #54 ; 1993-038C ; 4914th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (store/dump)
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 24 June 1993 at 4h48 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2255
Spacecraft:  Strela-3
Numbers: 1993 payload #55 ; 1993-038D ; 4915th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (store/dump)
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 24 June 1993 at 4h48 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2256
Spacecraft:  Strela-3
Numbers: 1993 payload #56 ; 1993-038E ; 4916th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (store/dump)
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 24 June 1993 at 4h48 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2257
Spacecraft:  Strela-3
Numbers: 1993 payload #57 ; 1993-038F ; 4917th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (store/dump)
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 24 June 1993 at 4h48 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
HGS-4 (Galaxy 4H)
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #58 ; 1993-039A ; 4918th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Hughes Communications Inc.
Launch: 25 June 1993 at 0h18 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 42P+ (V57).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Resurs F-18
Spacecraft:  Resurs-F1 14F43 No. 57
Numbers: 1993 payload #59 ; 1993-040A ; 4919th spacecraft.
Type: Earth remote sensing
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 25 June 1993 at 8h38 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-16/2, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Radcal
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #60 ; 1993-041A ; 4920th spacecraft.
Type: Radar calibration
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force
Launch: 25 June 1993 at 23h30 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-5, by a Scout G-1 (S217C).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Navstar 2-21 (USA 92)
Spacecraft:  Navstar SVN 39 / · Navstar 2A-12 / Navstar BIIA-21 (GPS)
Numbers: 1993 payload #61 ; 1993-042A ; 4921st spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force
Launch: 26 June 1993 at 13h27 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-17A, by a Delta 7925 (221).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
SEDS 2 (PMG-PDP)
Spacecraft:  Small Expendable-tether Deployer (Plasma Motor Generator + Far End Package + Plasma Diagnostic Package)
Numbers: 1993 payload #62 ; 1993-042B ; 4922nd spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force
Launch: 26 June 1993 at 13h27 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-17A, by a Delta 7925 (221).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Soyuz TM-17
Spacecraft:  Soyuz 7K-STM No. 66
Numbers: 1993 payload #63 ; 1993-043A ; 4923rd spacecraft.
Type: Piloted spacecraft
Sponsor: Russia (Korolev's Design Bureau)
Launch: 1st July 1993 at 14h38 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U2).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2258
Spacecraft:  US-P / US-PM s/n 3
Numbers: 1993 payload #64 ; 1993-044A ; 4924th spacecraft.
Type: Ocean surveillance ("RORSAT")
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 7 July 1993 at 7h12 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-90, by a F-1/Tsyklon 2.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2259
Spacecraft: Yantar-4K2 no. 68 / Kobal't
Numbers: 1993 payload #65 ; 1993-045A ; 4925th spacecraft.
Type: Reconnaissance
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 14 July 1993 at 16h48 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/3, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
DSCS III B-9 (USA 94)
Spacecraft:  DSCS III F-7
Numbers: 1993 payload #66 ; 1993-046A ; 4926th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force
Launch: 19 July 1993 at 22h04 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-36A, by an Atlas II ((3), AC-104 / Centaur II 8104, IABS-3).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 495 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2260
Spacecraft:  Zenit-8 / Oblik no. 3 / Resurs-T
Numbers: 1993 payload #67 ; 1993-047A ; 4927th spacecraft.
Type: Military cartography
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 22 July 1993 at 8h38 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/3, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Hispasat 1B
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #68 ; 1993-048A ; 4928th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Spain's Hispasat S.A.
Launch: 22 July 1993 at 22h58 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 44L (V58).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Insat 2B
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #69 ; 1993-048B ; 4929th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: India
Launch: 22 July 1993 at 22h58 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 44L (V58).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
NOSS 19 / Advanced NOSS 3 / SLDCOM 3
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #70 ; 1993 2nd loss ; 4930th spacecraft.
Type: Ocean surveillance
Sponsor: U.S. Navy
Launch: 2 August 1993 at 19h59 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-4E, by a Titan 4 (Titan 403A K-11 (45F-9)).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
SSU
Spacecraft:
Numbers: 1993 payload #71 ; 1993 3rd loss ; 4931st spacecraft.
Type: Ocean surveillance
Sponsor: U.S. Navy
Launch: 2 August 1993 at 19h59 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-4E, by a Titan 4 (Titan 403A K-11 (45F-9)).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
SSU
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #72 ; 1993 4th loss ; 4932nd spacecraft.
Type: Ocean surveillance
Sponsor: U.S. Navy
Launch: 2 August 1993 at 19h59 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-4E, by a Titan 4 (Titan 403A K-11 (45F-9)).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
SSU
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #73 ; 1993 5th loss ; 4933rd spacecraft.
Type: Ocean surveillance
Sponsor: U.S. Navy
Launch: 2 August 1993 at 19h59 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-4E, by a Titan 4 (Titan 403A K-11 (45F-9)).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
TLD
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #74 ; 1993 6th loss  ; 4934th spacecraft.
Type: Electronic intelligence?
Sponsor: U.S. Navy
Launch: 2 August 1993 at 19h59 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-4E, by a Titan 4 (Titan 403A K-11 (45F-9)).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Molniya 3-45
Spacecraft:  Molniya-3 No. 58
Numbers: 1993 payload #75 ; 1993-049A ; 4935th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 4 August 1993 at 0h57 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/3, by an A-2-e/"Molniya" (8K78M / ML).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
NOAA 13
Spacecraft:  NOAA I
Numbers: 1993 payload #76 ; 1993-050A ; 4936th spacecraft.
Type: Meteorology
Sponsor: NOAA
Launch: 9 August 1993 at 10h02 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-3W, by an Atlas E (34E / Star-37S-ISS).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2261
Spacecraft:  Oko #74
Numbers: 1993 payload #77 ; 1993-051A ; 4937th spacecraft.
Type: Missille early warning
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 10 August 1993 at 14h52 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-16/2, by an A-2-e/"Molniya" (8K78M / 2BL).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Progress M-19
Spacecraft:  Progress 7K-TGM No. 219
Numbers: 1993 payload #78 ; 1993-052A ; 4938th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to Mir
Sponsor: Russia (Korolev's Design Bureau)
Launch: 11 August 1993 at 22h19 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U N15000-634).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Resurs F-19
Spacecraft:  Resurs-F1 14F43 No. 56
Numbers: 1993 payload #79 ; 1993-053A ; 4939th spacecraft.
Type: Earth remote sensing
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 24 August 1993 at 10h48 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-16/2, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Navstar 2-22 (USA 94)
Spacecraft:  Navstar SVN 35 / · Navstar 2A-13 / Navstar BIIA-22 (GPS)
Numbers: 1993 payload #80 ; 1993-054A ; 4940th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force
Launch: 30 August 1993 at 12h43 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-17B, by a Delta 7925 (222).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Meteor 2-21
Spacecraft:  Meteor-2 No. 24
Numbers: 1993 payload #81 ; 1993-055A ; 4941st spacecraft.
Type: Meteorology
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 31 August 1993 at 4h48 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Temisat
Spacecraft:  Telespazio Micro Satellite
Numbers: 1993 payload #82 ; 1993-055B ; 4942nd spacecraft.
Type: Technology (date relay)
Sponsor: Italy's Telespazio
Launch: 31 August 1993 at 4h48 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-32, by a F-2/Tsyklon 3.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
UFO F2 (USA 95)
Spacecraft:  UHF F/O F2 ;  Ultra High Frequency Follow On
Numbers: 1993 payload #83 ; 1993-056A ; 4943rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: U.S. Navy
Launch: 3 September 1993 at 11h17 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-36B, by an Atlas I (AC-75 / Centaur I 5055).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2262
Spacecraft:  Don (5) / Orlets-1 no. 5
Numbers: 1993 payload #84 ; 1993-057A ; 4944th spacecraft.
Type: Reconnaissance
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 7 September 1993 at 13h26 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U2).
Orbit: Initial: 172 km x 290 km x 64.9°
Final: 207 km x 323 km x 64.9°
Recovered: After 103 days
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 506 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
STS-51
Spacecraft:  Discovery
Numbers: 1993 payload #85 ; 1993-058A ; 4945th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted spacecraft
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 12 September 1993 at 11h45 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-39B, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
ACTS
Spacecraft:  Advanced Communications Technology Satellite
Numbers: 1993 payload #86 ; 1993-058B ; 4946th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 12 September 1993 at 11h45 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-39B, by the Space Shuttle. Deployed from Discovery payload bay on 12 September 1993.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; SpacewarnNo.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
ORFEUS-SPAS
Spacecraft:  ASTRO-SPAS
Numbers: 1993 payload #87 ; 1993-058C ; 4947th spacecraft.
Type: Astronomy
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 12 September 1993 at 11h45 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-39B, by the Space Shuttle. Deployed from Discovery payload bay.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2263
Spacecraft:  Tselina-2
Numbers: 1993 payload #88 ; 1993-059A ; 4948th spacecraft.
Type: Electronic intelligence
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 16 September 1993 at 7h36 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-45/1, by a J-1/Zenit-2.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2264
Spacecraft:  US-P / US-PM s/n 4
Numbers: 1993 payload #89 ; 1993-060A ; 4949th spacecraft.
Type: Ocean surveillance ("RORSAT")
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 17 September 1993 at 0h43 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-90, by a F-1/Tsyklon 2.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
IRS-1E
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #90 ; 1993 7th loss ; 4950th spacecraft.
Type: Earth remote sensing
Sponsor: India's ISRO
Launch: 20 September 1993 at 5h12 UTC, from Sriharikota, by a PSLV (PSLV-D1).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
SPOT 3
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #91 ; 1993-061A ; 4951st spacecraft.
Type: Earth remote sensing
Sponsor: France's CNES
Launch: 26 September 1993 at 1h45 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 40 (V59).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
STELLA
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #92 ; 1993-061B ; 4952nd spacecraft.
Type: Geodesy
Sponsor:
Launch: 26 September 1993 at 1h45 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 40 (V59).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Eyesat 1 / AMRAD-Oscar-27
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #93 ; 1993-061C ; 4953rd spacecraft.
Type: Technology & radio-amateur communications
Sponsor: U.S. Interferometrics Inc.
Source: AMSAT
Launch: 26 September 1993 at 1h45 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 40 (V59).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission: AMRAD/EYESAT-1 was The amateur payload of EYESAT-1 was later designated AMRAD-OSCAR 27 once in orbit.
AO-27 is a secondary amateur communications payload carried aboard the EYESAT-1 experimental MICROSAT satellite built by Interferometrics Inc. of Chantilly, Virginia.  The commercial side of the spacecraft's mission is the experimental monitoring of mobile industrial equipment.The amateur equipment aboard the satellite was constructed by members of AMRAD, a technically oriented, non-profit organization of radio amateurs based in the Virginia suburbs of Washington, D.C., to meet the needs of amateurs for a platform to conduct digital satellite communications experiments.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ; A Brief History of Amateur Satellites ;
.
Healthsat 1
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #94 ; 1993-061D ; 4954th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (medical data relay)
Sponsor:
Launch: 26 September 1993 at 1h45 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 40 (V59).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
ITAMsat / Italy-OSCAR 26 (IO-26)
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #95 ; 1993-061E ; 4955th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (radio-amateur)
Sponsor: AMSAT-ITALY
Launch: 26 September 1993 at 1h45 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 40 (V59).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission: ITAMSAT was later designated Italy-OSCAR-26 once in orbit. IO-26 was built by AMSAT-ITALY. Its mission is to store and forward amateur radio messages like AO-16, LO-19, UO-22, KO-23 and KO-25. IO-26's operation is identical to AO-16 and LO-19. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ; A Brief History of Amateur Satellites ;
.
Uribyol 2 / KITSAT-OSCAR 25 (KO-25)
Spacecraft:  KITSAT-2
Numbers: 1993 payload #96 ; 1993-061F ; 4956th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (radio-amateur)
Sponsor: South Korea's Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) students
Launch: 26 September 1993 at 1h45 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 40 (V59).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission: KITSAT-2 was a South Korean experimental microsatellite based on the SSTL UoSAT bus built by the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). KO-25 was operated from The Satellite Technology Research Center (SaTReC) in South Korea. It was later designated KITSAT-OSCAR-25 once in orbit.
KO-25's mission was to take CCD pictures, process numerical information, measure radiation and receive and forward messages. The Infrared Sensor Experiment (IREX) was designed to acquire I/V characteristics of IR sensors. A passive cooling structure was devised for this experiment where ground controllers monitored the temperature of the experiment.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ; A Brief History of Amateur Satellites ;
.
PoSAT 1 / PoSAT-OSCAR 28
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #97 ; 1993-061G ; 4957th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (radio-amateur)
Sponsor: Portugal/University of Surrey
Launch: 26 September 1993 at 1h45 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 40 (V59).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission: PoSAT-1 is Portugal's first satellite achieved through a technology transfer program with Surrey Satellite Technology, Ltd. (SSTL). PoSAT-1 was built at the University of Surrey in a collaborative program between a consortium of Portuguese academia and industry.  The Portugese consortium sent 4 engineers to Surrey to participate in on-the-job training.  Like KITSAT-1, PoSAT-1 carries a wide range of technology experiments, including earth imaging cameras, DSP and space-radiation experiments. In addition, PoSAT-1 carries the first microsatellite GPS experiment and an ultra-low-cost CCD star sensor. It is operated jointly by the University of Surrey command station at Guildford and the Portugese command station at Sintra. PoSAT was operated on amateur frequencies for several weeks in early 1994. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ; A Brief History of Amateur Satellites ;
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Raduga 30
Spacecraft: Gran' No. 41L
Numbers: 1993 payload #98 ; 1993-062A ; 4958th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 30 September 1993 at 17h05 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/23, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-2 (8K82K 359-01 / 11S861 36L).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Landsat 6
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #99 ; 1993 8th loss ; 4959th spacecraft.
Type: Earth remote sensing
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 5 October 1993 at 17h56 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-4W, by a Titan 2 (SLV 23G-5).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
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FSW 1-14 / Jian Bing 
Spacecraft:  Fanhui Shi Weixing-1 No. 14
Numbers: 1993 payload #100 ; 1993-063A ; 4960th spacecraft.
Type: Reconnaissance
Sponsor: China
Launch: 8 October 1993 at 8h00 UTC, from Jiuquan's LA-2B?, by a Chang Zheng 2C (CZ2C-14).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Progress M-20
Spacecraft:  Progress 7K-TGM No. 220
Numbers: 1993 payload #101 ; 1993-064A ; 4961st spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to Mir
Sponsor: Russia (Korolev's Design Bureau)
Launch: 12 October 1993 at 21h33 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U 77044270).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
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STS-58 - SLS-2 
Spacecraft: Columbia
Numbers: 1993 payload #102 ; 1993-065A ; 4962nd spacecraft.
Type: Piloted spacecraft
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 18 October 1993 at 14h53 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-39B, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Intelsat 701
Spacecraft:  Intelsat 7 F1
Numbers: 1993 payload #103 ; 1993-066A ; 4963rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Intelsat
Launch: 22 October 1993 at 6h46 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 44LP (V60).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2265
Spacecraft:  Taifun-1B
Numbers: 1993 payload #104 ; 1993-067A ; 4964th spacecraft.
Type: Radar calibration
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 26 October 1993 at 10h00 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-132/1, by a Kosmos C-1 (11K65M 65065-624).
Orbit:
Decayed: 11 August 2003
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No. 598 ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Navstar 2-23 (USA 96)
Spacecraft:  Navstar SVN 34 / Navstar 2A 14 / Navstar BIIA-23 (GPS)
Numbers: 1993 payload #105 ; 1993-068A ; 4965th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force
Launch: 26 October 1993 at 17h04 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-17B, by a Delta 7925 (223).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Gorizont 28
Spacecraft: Gorizont No. 40L
Numbers: 1993 payload #106 ; 1993-069A ; 4966th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 28 October 1993 at 15h17 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/23, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-2 (8K82K 368-01 / 11S861 72L).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2266
Spacecraft:  Parus
Numbers: 1993 payload #107 ; 1993-070A ; 4967th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 2 November 1993 at 12h14 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-132/1, by a Kosmos C-1 (11K65M 53735-608).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Kosmos 2267
Spacecraft:  Yantar-4KS1 / Neman
Numbers: 1993 payload #108 ; 1993-071A ; 4968th spacecraft.
Type: Reconnaissance
Sponsor: Russia's Defense ministry
Launch: 5 November 1993 at 8h24 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by an A-2/Soyuz (11A511U2).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Gorizont 29 / Rimsat 
Spacecraft:  AP-1 Gorizont No. 41L
Numbers: 1993 payload #109 ; 1993-072A ; 4969th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 18 November 1993 at 13h54 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/23, by a D-1-e/Proton-K/DM-2 (8K82K 367-01 / 11S861 85L).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Solidaridad 1 (Satmex 3)
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #110 ; 1993-073A ; 4970th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Secretaria De Comunicaciones Y Transportes
Launch: 20 November 1993 at 1h17 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 44LP (V61).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission: The Solidaridad 1 communications satellite, a Hughes HS-601 owned by Mexico, failed on 27 August 2200 when its backup computer died; the prime had already failed.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 434 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Meteosat 6 / MOP 3
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #111 ; 1993-073B ; 4971st spacecraft.
Type: Meteorology
Sponsor: ESA
Launch: 20 November 1993 at 1h17 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 44LP (V61).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
DSCS III B-10 (USA 97)
Spacecraft:  DSCS III F-8
Numbers: 1993 payload #112 ; 1993-074A ; 4972nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: U.S. Air Force
Launch: 28 November 1993 at 23h40 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-36A, by an Atlas II ((3) AC-106 / Centaur II 8106, IABS-4).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 495 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
STS-61
Spacecraft:  Endeavour
Numbers: 1993 payload #113 ; 1993-075A ; 4973rd spacecraft.
Type: Piloted spacecraft
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 2 December 1993 at 9h27 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-39B, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
NATO IVB (USA 98)
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #114 ; 1993-076A ; 4974th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: NATO
Launch: 8 December 1993 at 0h48 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-17A, by a Delta 7925 (224).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Telstar 401
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #115 ; 1993-077A ; 4975th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: ATT
Launch: 16 December 1993 at 0h38 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's LC-36B, by an Atlas IIAS ((4N) AC-108 / Centaur II 8201).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
DBS 1 / DirecTV 1
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #116 ; 1993-078A ; 4976th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Hughes Communications Inc.
Launch: 18 December 1993 at 1h27 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 44L (V62).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Thaicom 1
Spacecraft: 
Numbers: 1993 payload #117 ; 1993-078B ; 4977th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Thailand's Shinawatra Satellite Public Co.
Launch: 18 December 1993 at 1h27 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-2, by an Ariane 44L (V62).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
Molniya 1-87
Spacecraft:  Molniya-1T
Numbers: 1993 payload #118 ; 1993-079A ; 4978th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 22 December 1993 at 20h37 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/3, by an A-2-e/"Molniya" (8K78M / ML).
Orbit:
Decayed:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's  ; Jonathan McDowell's Master List ; Mark Wade’s Encyclopedia Astronautica ; TRW Space Log ;
.
© Claude Lafleur, 2004-10 Mes sites web: claudelafleur.qc.ca