Home 2009 Summary
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The 129 Spacecrafts launched in 2009:
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1) NROL-26 (USA 202) 2) GOSAT / Ibuki 3) PRISM 4) SpriteSat
5) Kagayaki 6) SOHLA-1 7) SDS-1 8) STARS / Kukai
9) KKS 1 10) Koronas-Foton 11) Omid 12) NOAA 19 / NOAA-N Prime
13) Progress M-66 / ISS 32P 14) Express AM-44 15) Express MD1 16) Hot Bird 10
17) NSS-9 18) Spirale A 19) Spirale B 20) OCO / Orbiting 
Carbon Observatory
21) Telstar 11N 22) Raduga-1 23) Kepler 24) STS-119 / ISS 15A
25) ITS-S6 26) GOCE 27) Navstar 59 (USA 203) 28) Soyuz TMA-14 / ISS 18S
29) Eutelsat W2A 30) WGS 2 (USA 204) -- Kwang-
myongsong 2
31) Beigou 6 / Compass G2
32) RISAT-2 33) Anusat 34) SICRAL 1B 35) Yaogan VI
36) Kosmos 2450 / Kobalt-M 37) STSS-ATRR (USA 205) 38) Progress M-02M / ISS 33P 39) STS-125 / SM4
40) Herschel 41) Planck 42) Protostar-2 / Indostar II 43) Tacsat 3
44) Pharmasat 45) HawkSat-1 46) CP6 47) Aerocube 3
48) Meridian 2 49) Soyuz TMA-15 / ISS 19S 50) LRO / Lunar Recon- naissance Orbiter 51) LCROSS
52) Measat 3a 53) GOES 14 / GOES-O 54) Sirius FM5 55) Terrestar 1
56) Kosmos 2451 / Strela-3 57) Kosmos 2452 / Strela-3 58) Kosmos 2453 / Strela-3 59) Razaksat
60) STS-127 / ISS 2J/A 61) Kosmos 2454 / Parus 62) Sterkh 1 63) Progress M-67 / ISS 34P
64) Deimos 1 65) Dubaisat-1 66) DMC-2 / UK-DMC 2 67) AprizeSat 4
68) Nanosat-1B 69) AprizeSat 3 70) DRAGONSat - AggieSat 2 71) DRAGONSat - PARADIGM/BEVO 1
72) ANDE Passive (Pollux) 73) ANDE Active (Castor) 74) Asiasat 5 75) Navstar 60 (USA 206)
76) JCSAT 12 / JCSAT R-A 77) Optus D3 78) STSAT-2 79) STS-128 / ISS 17A
80) Palapa D 81) PAN / P360 (USA 207) 82) HTV 1 83) Meteor M1
84) BLITS 85) Sterkh 2 86) Universiteskiy 2 / Tatiana-2 87) UGATUSAT
88) Sumbandila /
SumbandilaSat
89) IRIS 90) Nimiq-5 91) Oceansat-2
92) UWE-2 93) BEESAT 94) ITU-p-SAT 1 95) SwissCube
96) Rubin-9.1 97) Rubin-9.2 98) STSS Demo 1 (USA 208) 99) STSS Demo 2 (USA 209)
100) Soyuz TMA-16 / ISS 20S 101) Amazonas 2 102) COMSATBw-1 103) WorldView-2
104) Progress M-03M / ISS 35P 105) DMSP 5D F-18 (USA 210) 106) NSS 12 107) Thor 6
108) SMOS 109) PROBA-2 110) Progress M-SO2 / Progress M-MRM2 111) Poisk ¦ MRM-2 / ISS-5R
112) SJ-11-01 / Shijian 11-01 113) STS-129 / ULF-3 114) Kosmos 2455 / Lotos-S 115) Intelsat 14 / IS-14
116) Eutelsat W7 117) IGS O-3 / IGS 5A 118) Intelsat 15 / IS-15 119) WGS 3 (USA 211)
120) YW 7 / Yaogan Weixing 7 121) Kosmos 2456 / Uragan-M 730  122) Kosmos 2457 / Uragan-M 733 123) Kosmos 2458 / Uragan-M 734
124) WISE 125) YW 8 / Yaogan Weixing 8 126) XW 1 / Xi Wang 1 127) Helios 2B
128) Soyuz TMA-17 / ISS 21S 129) DirecTV 12
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NROL-26 (USA 202) 
Spacecraft: NROL-26, NRO's launch L-26 
Chronologies: 2009 payload #1 ; 2009-001A ; 6,726th spacecraft.
Type: Probably an Electronic Intelligence
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. National Reconnaissance Office (NRO)
Launch: 18 January 2009 at 2h47 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-37B, by a Delta 4H.
Orbit: Probably in geostationary orbit.
Mission: Probably a new large-diameter-antenna signals intelligence satellite in the series whose earlier codenames were RHYOLITE, AQUACADE, MAGNUM, and ORION. NROL-26 could be the 10th satellite in the RHYOLITE lineage.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 605 ; Spacewarn No. 663 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; NRO's 17 Jan 09 ;
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GOSAT / Ibuki
Spacecraft: GOSAT stands for Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite; Ibuki means 'breath' in Japanese.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #2 ; 2009-002A ; 6,727th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Sciences
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 23 January 2009 at 3h54 UTC, from Tanegashima Space Center, by a H-IIA.
Orbit: Sun-synchronous, 669 km x 672 km x 98.0°
Mission: The 1750-kg GOSAT is designed to observe the concentration and distribution of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, etc.) across most of the Earth's surface. It carries the TANSO-FTS IR spectrometer and the TANSO-CAI cloud and aerosol imager. In its Sun-synchronous orbit, il is ables to re-image the same location after three days. The spacecraft is designed for a five year life span. JAXA is the agency responsible for development, launch and operations. The National Institute for Environmental Studies and the Ministry of the Environment carried out advanced processing and utilization of the data.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 605 ; Spacewarn No. 663 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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PRISM
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #3 ; 2009-002B ; 6,728th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Earth Imaging)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: University of Tokyo Students
Launch: 23 January 2009 at 3h54 UTC, from Tanegashima Space Center, by a H-IIA.
Orbit: 669 km x 672 km x 98.0°
Mission: Prism is a 5-kg remote sensing picosatellite from the University of Tokyo. It has a 10-cm aperture Earth imager on a 1-meter deployable boom.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 605 ; Spacewarn No. 663 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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SpriteSat
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #4 ; 2009-002C ; 6,729th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Sciences
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Tohoku University
Launch: 23 January 2009 at 3h54 UTC, from Tanegashima Space Center, by a H-IIA.
Orbit: 669 km x 672 km x 98.0°
Mission: SpriteSat is a 50-kg satellite with a gravity gradient boom to study flashes from lightning 'sprites'. It observes sprites and gamma-rays generated during Earth thunderstorms. It was developed by Tohoku University in Sendai.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 605 ; Spacewarn No. 663 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Kagayaki
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #5 ; 2009-002D ; 6,730th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Sorun Corp
Launch: 23 January 2009 at 3h54 UTC, from Tanegashima Space Center, by a H-IIA.
Orbit: 669 km x 672 km x 98.0°
Mission: Kagayaki is a 28-kg technology satellite with a variety of technology payloads. Developed by the Tokyo-based information system Sorun Corporation, Kagayaki observes aurorae from space. The goal of the mission is to connect the dreams of children with incurable diseases to space. The satellite's size is 31 x 31 x 35 cm. Among the design features are an autonomous on-board control system and an inflatable deployable boom. The mission goals are to measure orbital debris and observe auroral electric currents.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 605 ; Spacewarn No. 663 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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SOHLA-1
Spacecraft: SOHLA stands for Space Oriented Higashi-Osaka Leading Association exploratory satellite.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #6 ; 2009-002E ; 6,731st spacecraft.
Type: Commercial (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: SOHLA group
Launch: 23 January 2009 at 3h54 UTC, from Tanegashima Space Center, by a H-IIA.
Orbit: 669 km x 672 km x 98.0°
Mission: The SOHLA-1 is 50-kg satellite designed to observe lightning. it carries a cloud cover imager. It was developed by a team of small and midsize companies in Higashi-Osaka, Osaka Prefecture. Students at Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka University and Ryukoku University provided technological support. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 605 ; Spacewarn No. 663 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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SDS-1
Spacecraft: SDS stands for Small Demonstration Satellite
Chronologies: 2009 payload #7 ; 2009-002F ; 6,732th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 23 January 2009 at 3h54 UTC, from Tanegashima Space Center, by a H-IIA.
Orbit: 669 km x 672 km x 98.0°
Mission: SDS-1 is a 100-kg microsatellite with a camera, GPS receiver and Sun sensor. it is a technology demonstrator mission developed by JAXA. The satellite is approximately 70 x 70 x 60 cm in size. Solar cells provides approximately 100 Watts of power. The spacecraft features a multi-mode integrated transponder. During its mission, it carries out on-orbit verification of a space wire demonstration module, a cutting-edge microprocessor, and a thin-film solar cell.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 605 ; Spacewarn No. 663 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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STARS / Kukai
Spacecraft: Stars is also named Kukai after a famous priest and calligrapher.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #8 ; 2009-002G ; 6,733rd spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Students (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Kagawa University
Launch: 23 January 2009 at 3h54 UTC, from Tanegashima Space Center, by a H-IIA.
Orbit: 669 km x 672 km x 98.0°
Mission: STARS is a 7-kg picosatellite demonstrating a tethered space robot. It consists of two boxes, Ku and Kai, connected by a tether, built by Kagawa University. A camera built into the smaller unit is designed to photograph the other unit in space. The satellite explores the possibility of using the technique to examine the outer walls of space stations.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 605;Spacewarn No. 663 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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KKS 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #9 ; 2009-002H ; 6,734th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Tokyo Metropolitan College of Aeronautical Engineering
Launch: 23 January 2009 at 3h54 UTC, from Tanegashima Space Center, by a H-IIA.
Orbit: 669 km x 672 km x 98.0°
Mission: KKS-1 is a 3-kg satellite that carries an Earth imager. The goal of this educational satellite is to demonstrate a micro propulsion system and three-axis attitude control functions. This 15-cm cube was built by Kouku-kosen (Tokyo Metropolitan College of Aeronautical Engineering). 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 605 ; Spacewarn No. 663 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Koronas-Foton
Spacecraft: also known as CORONAS-Photon
Chronologies: 2009 payload #10 ; 2009-003A ; 6,735th spacecraft.
Type: Earth/Space Science
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI) 
Launch: 30 January 2009 at 13h30 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome, by a Tsiklon-3.
Orbit: 539 km x 562 km x 82.5° 
Mission: KORONAS-Foton is a 1920-kg satellite for solar physics, solar-terrestrial connection physics and astrophysics. With an expected lifetime of three years, it is part of the International Living with a Star (ILWS) program. The primary purpose of the mission is the study of solar electromagnetic radiation, especially from solar flares, in the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) up to high-energy gamma-ray radiation. It is also capable of making parallel observations of Earth's upper atmosphere in EUV and soft X-rays as well as monitoring other astrophysical X-ray and gamma-ray sources. A high-energy particle detector on board is also capable of monitoring the near-Earth plasma environment. The Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI) is the prime institution responsible for the mission payload. The Scientific-Research Electromechanic Institute (NIIEM) is responsible for the spacecraft design and manufacture. Teams from Russia, India, Ukraine, Spain and Poland contributed to the development of the science payloads. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 606 ; Spacewarn No. 663 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Omid 
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #11 ; 2009-004A ; 6,736th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Iran
Launch: 2 February 2009 at ~18h33 UTC, from an unidentified location, by a Safir 2.
Orbit: 245 km x 378 km x 55.51°, or
245 km x 439 km x 55.
Mission: Omid is the first Iranian-launched satellite, a small technology satellite. It has a mass of 25 to 27 kg and it is a 0.40-meter cube. It carries an instrument to measure the space environment and a GPS receiver modified for use in the unstabilized (i.e. tumbling) satellite, according to the Iranian Space Agency. IRNA associates the project with "Saa Iran Industries", and connects it with the celebrations for the 30th anniversary of the revolution that brought Ayatollah Khomeini to power.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 606 ; Spacewarn No. 664 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; SpaceflightNow's 3 Feb 09 ;  New York Times's 3 Feb 09 ;
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NOAA 19 (NOAA-N Prime)
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #12 ; 2009-005A ; 6,737th spacecraft.
Type: Meteorology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NOAA
Launch: 6 February 2009 at 10h22 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-2W, by a Delta II 7320-10C.
Orbit: 846 km x 866 km x 98.7°x 102 min.
Mission: NOAA 19, or NOAA-N Prime, is a 1,440-kg polar operational environmental satellite designed to collect global data on cloud cover, surface conditions such as ice, snow, and vegetation, atmospheric temperatures, and moisture, aerosol and ozone distributions.  It also collect and relay information from fixed and moving data platforms. In addition, the satellite carries two search and rescue instruments. It is the last in a long series of civil POES (Polar Orbiting Environmental System) satellites launched since Tiros 1 in 1960. The satellites were all built by RCA/East Windsor and its corporate successors (now Lockheed Martin).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 606 ; Spacewarn No. 664 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; NOAA's 6 Feb 09 ;
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Progress M-66 / ISS 32P
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #13 ; 2009-006A ; 6,738th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 10 February 2009 at 5h49 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Initial: 192,5 km x 249,6 km x 51,63° x 88,62 min.
At docking: 350.5 km x 362.2 km x 51.64° x 91.67 min.
Reentry Undocked from ISS on 6 May 2009 at 15h18 UTC.
Mission: Progress-M 66 is a resupply vessel for the International Space Station, that delivered  more than 2.4 tons of cargos.  The cargo vehicle carried 1,300 kg of equipment, food, clothing, life support system gear and a new Orlan spacesuit, 50 kg of oxygen and air for the station's atmosphere and 870 kg of propellant for the Russian maneuvering thrusters. The craft docked on the Pirs module on 13 February 2009 at 7h18 UT. Approach to the space station, its fly-around and docking were performed in automatic mode. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 606 & 611 ; Spacewarn No. 664 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSC Energiya's 10 Feb 09 & 13 Feb 09 ;
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.Express AM-44
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #14 ; 2009-007A ; 6,739th spacecraft.
Type: Communiations
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Kosmicheskiya Svyaz (Russian Communications Satellite Co.)
Launch: 11 February 2009 at 0h03 UTC, from Baikonur Cosmodrome's LC-200/39, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 11° West longitude.
Mission: Express AM-44 is a 2,532-kg satellite to serve Russia as well as other countries in Europe, Asia and Africa. It carries 16 Ku-band, 10 C-band and one L-band transponder supplied by Thales Alenia Space. The satellite provides digital television and radio broadcasting, data networking, videoconferencing and internet services for at least 12 years. Ekspress AM-44 is another in the AM series built by Reshetnev.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 606 ; Spacewarn No. 664 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Express MD1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #15 ; 2009-007B ; 6,740th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Kosmicheskiya Svyaz (Russian Communications Satellite Co.)
Launch: 11 February 2009 at 0h03 UTC, from Baikonur Cosmodrome's LC-200/39, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 80° East longitude. 
Mission: Express MD1 is a 1,140-kg communications satellite that provides communications, digital broadcasting and Internet access with eight C-band and one L-band transponder provides by Thales Alenia Space. It is the first in a new series built by Krunichev and based on the Kazsat satellite.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 606 ; Spacewarn No. 664 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Hot Bird 10
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #16 ; 2009-008A ; 6,741st spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Eutelsat
Launch: 12 February 2009 at 22h06 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 13° East longitude (in 2010).
Mission: Hot Bird 10 is a 4,892-kg communications satellite equipped with 64 Ku-band transponders designed for television broadcasting. Built by EADS Astrium, it is identical to Hot Bird 8 and 9 satellites. Its principal mission si to join Eutelsat's flagship video neighbourhood at 13° East longitude (in 2010). Prior to that, the craft will be used to consolidate other expanding Eutelsat video neighborhoods. The craft is a 2.7 x 3.4 x 6.3-meter (38-meter span in orbit), 3-axis stabilized satellite with an orbital life of more than 15 years.
Launch: The 187th Ariane mission=, the 43rd Ariane 5 launch, was carrying a total payload of 8,511 kg, including 7,420 kg for the satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 606 ; Spacewarn No. 664 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Arianespace Press Kit
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NSS-9
Spacecraft: NSS stands for New Skyes Satelites
Chronologies: 2009 payload #17 ; 2009-008B ; 6,742nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: SES New Skies
Launch: 12 February 2009 at 22h06 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 183° West longitude.
Mission: NSS-9 is a 2,230-kg communications satellite fitted with 44 high-power C-band for services to a variety of customers, including TV broadcasters, government users, operators and transport firms in the Pacific islands, as well as the maritime industry. Built by Orbital Sciences Corporation using a Star-2 platform, it has a design life of at least 15 years. NSS-9 is a 3.05 x 2.30 x 4.10-meter (12.6-meter span in orbit), 3-axis stabilized satellite.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 606 ; Spacewarn No. 664 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Arianespace Press Kit ;
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Spirale A
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #18 ; 2009-008C ; 6,743rd spacecraft.
Type: Technology (Early Warning)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: France's Direction générale des armements (DGA)
Launch: 12 February 2009 at 22h06 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit:
Mission: Spirale A is one of a two 117,3-kg microsatellite demonstration program designed to collect infrared images of terrestrial backgrounds and analyze them to assess the detectability of ballistic missiles during their powered phase. Together with Spirale B, it will pave the way for a future ballistic missile warning system, designed to monitor the proliferation of ballistic missiles, determine the origin of launches, and provide early warning of launches. These microsatellites were built by EADS Astrium for French defense procurement Agency (DGA) using a CNES-designed Myriade platform. Each measure 1.36 x 0.72 x 0.72-meter (with an In orbit span  of 2.17 meters) and have an orbital lifespan of 14 months.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 606 ; Spacewarn No. 664 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Arianespace Press Kit
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Spirale B
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #19 ; 2009-008D ; 6,744th spacecraft.
Type: Technology (Early Warning)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: France's Direction générale des armements (DGA)
Launch: 12 February 2009 at 22h06 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit:
Mission: Spirale B is one of a two 117,3-kg microsatellite demonstration program designed to collect infrared images of terrestrial backgrounds and analyze them to assess the detectability of ballistic missiles during their powered phase. Together with Spirale A, it will pave the way for a future ballistic missile warning system, designed to monitor the proliferation of ballistic missiles, determine the origin of launches, and provide early warning of launches. These microsatellites were built by EADS Astrium for French defense procurement Agency (DGA) using a CNES-designed Myriade platform. Each measure 1.36 x 0.72 x 0.72-meter (with an In orbit span  of 2.17 meters) and have an orbital lifespan of 14 months.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 606 ; Spacewarn No. 664 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Arianespace Press Kit
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OCO / Orbiting Carbon Observatory
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #20 ; 2009 1st loss ; 6,745th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Sciences
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 24 February 2009 at 9h55 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base, by a Taurus XL.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: Taurus XL's payload fairing failed to separate. It is believed that the rocket and payload crashed near the Antarctic.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 607 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 24 Feb 09
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Telstar 11N
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #21; 2009-009A ; 6,746th spacecraft.
Type: Commucations
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Telesat Canada
Launch: 26 February 2009 at 18h30 UTC, from Baykonur LC-45, by Zenit-3SLB.
Orbit: Geostationary at 37.5° West longitude. 
Mission: Telstar 11N is 4010-kg communications satellite equipped with 39 Ku-band transponders to provides video and data applications for North America, Western Europe, and Africa as well as provide mobile broadband services to ships and airplanes on Atlantic transoceanic routes. Built by Space Systems/Loral for Telesat, it is designed for a service life of 15 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 607 ; Spacewarn No. 664 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Raduga-1
Spacecraft: Globus
Chronologies: 2009 payload #22 ; 2009-010A ; 6,747th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 28 February 2009 at 4h10 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/24, by a Proton-K/DM2.
Orbit: Geostationary at 90° East Longitude 
Mission: Raduga 1 is a military communication relay satellite of the Raduga class (also known by their military designation, Globus) that will be eventually deployed in a geosynchronous orbit. The Space Forces report designated the satellite as "Raduga-1", but it is not clear whether it is an older Raduga-1 or a newer Raduga-1M (the first satellite of this class, Raduga 1M-1 was launched in December 2007). The new satellite will join three other active Raduga/Globus satellites: Raduga 1M-1 (launched in 2007 and deployed at 70° East), Raduga 1-7 (launched in 2004 and deployed at 85° East) and Raduga 1-5 (launched in 2000, at 43°East).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 607 ; Spacewarn No. 664 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSNF's 28 Feb 09 ;
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Kepler
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #23 ; 2009-011A ; 6,748th spacecraft.
Type: Astronomy
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 7 March 2009 at 3h50 UTC, from Cape Canaveral's SLC-17B, by a Delta II 7925-10L.
Orbit: Sun orbit
Mission: Kepler is a 1,052-kg astronomy probe which mission is to search for Earth-sized planets around other stars by looking for brightness variations in over 100,000 stars in the Cygnus-Lyra region. The photometer on Kepler will continuously monitor the same star-field in a 12° field of view over the nominal 3.5 year lifetime, allowing multiple observations of transits of exoplanets in orbits up to one year. To help fulfill the science objectives, the craft was placed into a solar orbit of period 372.5 days. This orbit helps maintain a stable pointing attitude. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 608 , 610 ; Spacewarn No. 665 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 2014 Stories ; NASA's 2010-2014 News Releases ; Spaceflight Now’s 2013 Stories, 2014 Stories
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STS-119 / ISS 15A
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #24 ; 2009-012A ; 6,749th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 15 March 2009 at 23h43 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit: At docking: 348.2 km x 360.9 km x 51.64° x 91.63 min.
Mission: STS-119 is a piloted spacecraft that carried seven astronauts (six American and one Japanese) to the International Space Station. The Orbiter docked on 17 March 2009 at ISS at 21:20 UT. The primary goal of the mission was to bring the final set of solar arrays (starboard 6 or S6 truss segment) to the ISS and install them. The crew performed three spacewalks to install the truss segment and carry out other activities. The crew brought aboard the ISS the first Japanese long-duration astronaut (Wakata) and delivered a new urine processor distillation assembly as part of the crew life support system. The Orbiter undocked from the ISS on 25 March at 19:53 UT and landed at Cape Canaveral on 28 March at 19:14 UT. It  returned with samples of water cleaned by the recycling system and also frozen biological samples collected over several months as part of a medical experiment on human response to microgravity.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 608 ; Spacewarn No. 665 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; NASA's STS-119 & Press Kit ;
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ITS-S6
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #25 ; 2009 n/a ; 6,750th spacecraft.
Type: Space Station Component
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 15 March 2009 at 23h43 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 608 ;
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GOCE
Spacecraft: GOCE stands for Gravity-Field and Ocean Circulation Explorer
Chronologies: 2009 payload #26 ; 2009-013A ; 6,751st spacecraft.
Type: Earth Science
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: European Space Agency (ESA)
Launch: 17 March 2009 at 14h21 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by a Rokot.
Orbit:
Mission: GOCE is a 1,100-kg science satellite designed to measure Earth's gravitational field to create very high-resolution maps of the geoid. These maps will provide the baseline for measurements of ocean circulation and sea-level change. The satellite carries six high-sensitivity accelerometers arranged along three axes of the spacecraft. To enable the satellite to acquire high-resolution measurements, the craft must travel at a low orbital altitude (260 km) at which atmospheric drag effects are still significant. To compensate for these effects, the satellite has a sleek arrow-shaped design to reduce drag and small winglets and a tail fin to stabilize the spacecraft. It is 5 meters long by 1 meter wide and its fixed solar arrays produce 1.3 kW of power. GOCE's orbital altitude is also maintained with the assistance of an on-board ion engine.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 608 ; Spacewarn No. 665 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Spaceflight Now’s 2013 Stories
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Navstar 59 (USA 203)
Spacecraft: Navstar SVN 49 / GPS IIR-20
Chronologies: 2009 payload #27 ; 2009-014A ; 6,752nd spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 24 March 2009 at 8h34 UTC, from Cape Canaveral''s SLC-17A, by a Delta II 7925.
Orbit:
Mission: Navstar 63 is a navigational craft in the GPS fleet that will replace the Navstar 2A-18 satellite launched in 1996.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 609 ; Spacewarn No. 665 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Soyuz TMA-14 / ISS 18S
Spacecraft: Soyuz 11F732 (7K-STMA) No. 224
Chronologies: 2009 payload #28 ; 2009-015A ; 6,753rd spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 26 March 2009 at 11h49 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz-FG.
Orbit: Initial: 199.0 km x 250.9 km x 51.65°x 88.7 min.
At docking: 347.2 km x 360.3 km x 51.64° x 91.62 min.
Mission: Soyuz-TMA 14 is a crew transport craft that carried a Russian cosmonaut (Padalka), an American astronaut (Barratt) and a space tourist (Simonyi) to the International Space Station. (For Simonyi, this is his second space flight.) The spacecraft docked with the Zvezda module of the ISS on 28 March 2009 at 13:05 UT. The last 150 meters during the approach to docking were performed manually after a computer glitch occurred. The two astronauts will form part of the ISS Expedition 19 crew while the tourist will returned on 8 April 2009 aboard Soyuz TMA-13 with two members of the current ISS crew.
     Soyuz TMA-14 undocked from the Pirs moduleon 11 October 2009 at 1h07 and landed in Kazakhstan at 4h32 UTC.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 609 & 617 ; Spacewarn No. 665 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; NASA's Expedition 19 & Press Kit ; RSC Energia's 26 Mar 09, 28 Mar 09, 11 Oct 09 & Expedition 19/20
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Eutelsat W2A
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #29 ; 2009-016A ; 6,754th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Eutelsat
Launch: 3 April 2009 at 16h24 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-200/39, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 10° East longitude.
Mission: W2A is a 5,900-kg communications satellite that provides data and video service to customers across Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and parts of South America and India. It carries 46 Ku-band and 10 C-band transponders and a new S-band system. The S-band system will provide video and data to mobile devices in Europe.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 610 ; Spacewarn No. 666 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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WGS 2 (USA 204)
Spacecraft: WGS stands for Wideband Global Satellite
Chronologies: 2009 payload #30 ; 2009-017A ; 6,755th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 4 April 2009 at 0h31 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Base's SLC-41, by an Atlas V.
Orbit: Geostationary at 60° East longitude. 
Mission: WGS F2 is a military communications satellite that provides communications in the X- and Ka-bands.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 610 ; Spacewarn No. 666 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Kwangmyongsong 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload n/a ; 2009 n/a ; n/a spacecraft.
Type: Presumabely a technology comsat payload
(More probably a long-range missile test)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: North Korea
Launch: 5 April 2009 at 2h30 UTC, from Tonghae, by an Unha-2 missile.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 610 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Beidou 6 / Compass G2 
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #31 ; 2009-018A ; 6,756th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 14 April 2009 at 16h16 UTC, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3C.
Orbit: Geostarionary
Mission: Beidou, also known as Compass G2, is a navigation satellite intended to form part of an eventual system known as Compass and composed of 30 satellites in geostationary and medium altitude orbits. This satellite is the second "second generation" Beidou navigation satellite, or COMPASS-G2. The first four Beidou were called Beidou Navigation Test Satellite; the most recent two are the operational Beidou.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 610 ; Spacewarn No. 666 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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RISAT-2
Spacecraft: RISAT stands for Radar Imaging Satellite 
Chronologies: 2009 payload #32 ; 2009-019A ; 6,757th spacecraft.
Type: Radar Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO)
Launch: 20 April 2009 at 1h15 UTC, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR's Second Launch Pad (SLP), by a PSLV.
Orbit: circular at 550 km x 41° x 90 min.
Mission: RISAT-2 is a 300-kg all-weather radar imaging satellite with the capability to take images of the Earth during day and night as well as cloudy conditions. RISAT-2 was realised by ISRO in association with Israel Aerospace Industries. This satellite enhances ISRO's capability for Earth observation, especially during floods, cyclones, landslides and in disaster management in a more effective way.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 610 ; Spacewarn No. 666 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; ISRO's 20 Apr 09
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Anusat
Spacecraft: Anusat stands for ANna University satellite
Chronologies: 2009 payload #33 ; 2009-019B ; 6,758th spacecraft.
Type: Technology (Communications)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Anna University, Chennai, India
Launch: 20 April 2009 at 1h15 UTC, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR's 2nd pad, by a PSLV.
Orbit:
Mission: ANUSAT is a 40-kg satellite, the first experimental communication satellite built by an Indian University under guidance of ISRO, to demonstrate the technologies related to message store and forward operations
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 610 ; ISRO's 20 Apr 09 ; Spacewarn No. 666 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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SICRAL 1B
Spacecraft: SICRAL stands for Sistema Italiano per Comunicazioni Riservate ed Allarmi (Italian System for Classified Communications and Alarms)
Chronologies: 2009 payload #34 ; 2009-020A ; 6,759th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Italian Defense Ministry
Launch: 20 April 2009 at 8h16 UTC, from Odyssey, by a Zenit-3SL.
Orbit: Geostarionary at 11.8° East longitude.
Mission: SICRAL 1B is a 3,038-kg military communications satellite that is intended for use by the Italian military, law enforcement and civil emergency agencies.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 610 ; Spacewarn No. 666 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Yaogan VI
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #35 ; 2009-021A ; 6,760th spacecraft.
Type: Radar Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 22 April 2009 at 2h55 UTC, from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2C.
Orbit:
Mission: Yaogan 6 is officially an Earth remote sensing satellite.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 610 ; Spacewarn No. 666 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Kosmos 2450
Spacecraft: Kobalt-M
Chronologies: 2009 payload #36 ; 2009-022A ; 6,761st spacecraft.
Type: Photo Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russia Defense Ministry
Launch: 29 April 2009 at 16h58 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome LC-16/2, by a Soyuz U.
Orbit: 167 km x 335 km x 67° x 89 min.
Mission: Kosmos 2450 is an optical reconnaissance satellite of the Kobalt-M type.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 610 & 611  ; Spacewarn No. 666 ; National Space Science  Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSNF 29 Apr 09
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STSS-ATRR (USA 205)
Spacecraft: STSS stands for Space Tracking and Surveillance System
ATRR stands for Advanced Technology Risk Reduction satellite 
Chronologies: 2009 payload #37 ; 2009-023A ; 6,762nd spacecraft.
Type: Space Defense
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Missile Defense Agency
Launch: 5 May 2009 at 20h24 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-2W, by a Delta II 7920-10C.
Orbit: 867 km x 878 km x 98.9°
Mission: STSS ATRR is a military technology demonstration satellite. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 611 ; Spacewarn No. 667 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Progress M-02M / ISS 33P
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #38 ; 2009-024A ; 6,763rd spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 7 May 2009 at 18h37 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz U.
Orbit: Initial: 193.4 km x 251.5 km x 51.64° x 88.65 min.
Mission: Progress M-02M is a resupply vessel for the International Space Station. It carries about 2.5 tons of spare parts, life support gear and hardware. It also resupplied the station with propellant, pure oxygen and air. The cargo ship docked with the ISS at the Earth-facing port of the Pirs module on 12 May 2009 at 19h24 UT. Prior to docking, the Progress was used to perform tests of a new avionics system. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 611 ; Spacewarn No. 667 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSC Energia's 7 May 09 & 12 May 09
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STS-125 / SM4
Spacecraft: SM4 stand for Servicing Mission 4 (of the Hubble Space Telescope)
Chronologies: 2009 payload #39; 2009-025A ; 6,764th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 11 May 2009 at 18h02 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit: 562 km x 568 km x 28.5° 
Mission: STS 125 is a crew transport spacecraft which carried seven astronauts for the fifth Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission. Over the course of five spacewalks, the astronauts replaced two science instruments, repaired two others and replaced gyroscopes, star sensors, a science computer, batteries and thermal blankets. The mission concluded with a landing at Edwards Air Force Base on 24 May 2009 at 15h39 UT.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 611 ; Spacewarn No. 667 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; NASA's STS-125 & Press Kit
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Herschel
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #40 ; 2009-026A ; 6,765th spacecraft.
Type: Astronomy
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: European Space Agency (ESA)
Launch: 14 May 2009 at 13h12 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Stationed at the Earth-Sun L-2 Lagrange point (1.5 million km towards midnight).
April 2013: 1.04 AU x 1.06 AU x 0.19° Solar orbit
Mission: Herschel is a 3,400-kg astronomy satellite that, from an orbital position around the second Lagrangian point, makes infrared observations of stars, galaxies and star-forming regions using a 3.5 m-diameter mirror, the largest yet carried into space. The mission lifetime is nominally three years but may continue until the helium has been depleted.
     After completing a very successful mission in 2013, Herschel was sent into solar orbit and deactivated; it departed L2 on 1st April and was turned off on 17 June 2013.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 611, 654 ; Spacewarn No. 667 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Arianespace's Press kit ; ESA's 22 Jan 14' ; NASA's 22 Jan 14 ; Spaceflight Now’s 2013 Stories ;
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Planck
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #41 ; 2009-026B ; 6,766th spacecraft.
Type: Astronomy
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: European Space Agency (ESA)
Launch: 14 May 2009 at 13h12 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Stationed at the Earth-Sun L-2 Lagrange point ( 1.5 million km towards midnight).
August 2013: 1.00 AU x 1.10 AU x 0.1° Solar orbit
Mission: Planck is a 1,900-kg astronomy satellite that, from its orbital position around the L-2 Lagrangian point, measures minute variations in the cosmic microwave background radiation. This radiation is expected to provided scientists with detailed information about the age, size, mass and geometry of the early universe. Planck is expected to produce two all-sky maps before the end of its 15-month mission. 
     After completing a very successful mission in 2013, Plank was sent into solar orbit and deactivated; is departed L2 on 14 August 2013 for solar orbit and switched off on 23 October 2013. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 611, 654 ; Spacewarn No. 667 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Arianespace's Press kit ; Spaceflight Now’s 2013 Stories
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Protostar-2 / Indostar II
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #42 ; 2009-027A ; 6,767th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Indonesia's Protostar Ltd.
Launch: 16 May 2009 at 0h57 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostarionary at 108°East longitude.
Mission: Protostar 2 is a communications satellite that serves customers in Indonesia, India, Taiwan and the Philippines. It carries 13 S-band and 27 Ku-band transponders for television and Internet access.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 611 ; Spacewarn No. 667 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Tacsat 3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #43 ; 2009-028A ; 6,768th spacecraft.
Type: Technology (Earth imaging)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 19 May 2009 at 23h55 UTC, from Wallops Island's LA-0B, by a Minotaur I.
Orbit: 432 km x 467 km x 40.5°
Mission: Tacsat 3 is an experimental military satellite carrying a hyperspectral imager.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 611 ; Spacewarn No. 667 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Pharmasat
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #44 ; 2009-028B ; 6,769th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA 
Launch: 19 May 2009 at 23h55 UTC, from Wallops Island's LA-0B, by a Minotaur I.
Orbit: 432 km x 467 km x 40.5°
Mission: Pharmasat is a small biology research satellite designed to measure the influence of microgravity upon yeast resistance to an antifungal agent. The yeast cells will be cultivated in 48 independent microwells. Since previous observations indicate that certain microorganisms may become more virulent in space, an antibiotic will be applied at different dosage levels to each microwell to investigate its effectiveness. The results of this work are expected to lead to effective countermeasure development for long-term space travel and habitation. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 611 ; Spacewarn No. 667 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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HawkSat-1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #45 ; 2009-028C ; 6,770th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/student
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Hawk Institute for Space Sciences
Launch: 19 May 2009 at 23h55 UTC, from Wallops Island's LA-0B, by a Minotaur I.
Orbit: 432 km x 467 km x 40.5°
Mission: Hawksat 1 is a technology demonstration mission to test the hardiness of materials to the space environment.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 611 ; Spacewarn No. 667 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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CP6
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #46 ; 2009-028D ; 6,771st spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Cal Poly
Launch: 19 May 2009 at 23h55 UTC, from Wallops Island's LA-0B, by a Minotaur I.
Orbit: 432 km x 467 km x 40.5°
Mission: CP 6 is a technology demonstration mission consisting of two parts. The first part of the mission will use sensors to determine attitude and use Earth imaging for verification. The second part of the mission will study the effectiveness of a device for collecting electrons from the ambient plasma environment. This technology will have potential application in electrodynamic propulsion systems.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 611 ; Spacewarn No. 667 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Aerocube 3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #47 ; 2009-028E ; 6,772nd spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Aerospace Corp.
Launch: 19 May 2009 at 23h55 UTC, from Wallops Island's LA-0B, by a Minotaur I.
Orbit: 432 km x 467 km x 40.5°
Mission: Aerocube 3 is a miniature CubeSats satellite that performs experiments and tests various technologies in space including a two-axis Sun sensor and an Earth sensor. During a portion of the mission, the satellite remained tethered to the upper stage of the rocket to study the dynamics of the system under different tether lengths. The second phase of the mission allowed Aerocube 3 to fly untethered and make several Earth observations. The satellite also includes a balloon which inflated at the end of the mission and reduced the orbital lifetime.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 611 ; Spacewarn No. 667 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Meridian 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #48 ; 2009-029A ; 6,773rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 21 May 2009 at 21h53 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/4, by a Soyuz-2-1a/Fregat.
Orbit: 320 km x 36,500 km x 62.8° x 645 min.
Mission: Meridian 2 is a military communications satellite.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 611 ; Spacewarn No. 667 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSVN 22 May 09 ;
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Soyuz TMA-15 / ISS 19S
Spacecraft: Soyuz 11F732 (7K-STMA) No. 225
Chronologies: 2009 payload #49 ; 2009-030A ; 6,774th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 27 May 2009 at 10h34 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz-FG.
Orbit: Initial: 199.0 km x 240.7 km x 51.65° x 88.62 min.
At docking: 356.4 km x 343.3 km x 51.64° x 91.53 min.
Mission: Soyuz TMA-15 is a crew transport craft that carried a Russian cosmonaut (Romanenko), an European astronaut (De Winne) and a Canadian astronaut (Thirsk) to the International Space Station. It docked with Earth-facing port of the Zarya module of the ISS on 29 May 2009 at 12h34 UT. Together with the Soyuz TMA-14 crew, this Soyuz TMA-15 crew formed ISS Expedition 20, increasing the number of crew members of the ISS to six.
     Soyuz TMA-15 undocked from the Zarya nadir port of ISS  on 1 December 2009 at 3h56 UTC.  The deorbit engine was fired at 6h26 UTC, ans the craft landed at 7h15:34 UTC.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 611 & 619; Spacewarn No. 667 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; NASA's Expedition 20 & Press Kit ; RSC Energia's 27 May 09, 29 May 09, 1 Dec 09 & Expedition 19/20 ;
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LRO / Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #50 ; 2009-031A ; 6,775th spacecraft.
Type: Planetary Probe (Moon)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 18 June 2009 at 21h32 UTC, from Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-41, by an Atlas V 401.
Orbit: Lunar oirbit:
Mission: LRO is a lunar orbiter mission intended to provide, from a polar orbit of 50 km altitude, high resolution maps of the lunar surface at several wavelengths, altimetry data, and study permanently shadowed lunar craters near the poles to search for signs of water ice. The primary mission duration is one year, with two or three more years in an extended mission phase. LRO carries seven scientific instruments, including two narrow-angle cameras to make high-resolution, monochromatic images of the surface, with a resolution down to 1 meter. Approximately 10% of the surface will be imaged at this resolution. The wide-angle camera will take color and ultraviolet images over the complete lunar surface at 100-m resolution.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 612 ; Spacewarn No. 668 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 2014 Stories ; NASA's 2010-2014 NASA News Releases ;
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LCROSS
Spacecraft: LCROSS stands for Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite
Chronologies: 2009 payload #51 ; 2009-031B ; 6,776th spacecraft.
Type: Planetary Probe (Lunar)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 18 June 2009 at 21h32 UTC, from Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-41, by an Atlas V 401.
Orbit: Elleptical Earth orbit; crash on the Moon.
Mission: LCROSS consists of a shepherding satellite and the attached spent Centaur upper stage. The mission objective is to send the Centaur upper stage into a lunar crater near the south pole of the Moon and observe the impact. In particular, LCROSS will be looking for signs of water in the debris plume. LCROSS carries two near-infrared spectrometers, a visible light spectrometer, two mid-infrared, two near-infrared and one visible light camera and a visible light radiometer. Approximately four minutes after the Centaur impact, the shepherding satellite will also impact the Lunar surface.
     On 9 October 2009, the LCROSS probe separated from the Centaur stage at 1h50 UTC. The tandem approached the lunar surface and Centaur Impact in Cabeus crater at 11h31 UTC, followed by LCROSS at 11h35 UTC. Unexpectedly, no bright visible plume was seen either from LCROSS or Earth, but LRO and LCROSS detected signatures from the event.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 612 & 617 ; Spacewarn No. 668 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Measat 3a
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #52 ; 2009-032A ; 6,777th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Malaysia
Launch: 21 June 2009 at 21h50 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-45, by a Zenit-3SLB.
Orbit: Geostarionary at 91.5°East longitude.
Mission: MEASAT 3a is a communications satellite that includes 12 C-band and 12 Ku-band transponders to provide telecommunications and video service to customers in the Asia-Pacific region, the Middle East, and Africa. It provides direct-to-home programming to customers in Malaysia and Indonesia. The satellite has a design life of 15 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 612 ; Spacewarn No. 668 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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GOES 14 / GOES-O
Spacecraft: GOES stands for Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 
Chronologies: 2009 payload #53 ; 2009-033A ; 6,778th spacecraft.
Type: Meteorology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administation (NOAA)
Launch: 27 June 2009 at 22h51 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-37B, by a Delta 4M+(4,2).
Orbit: Geostationary (in-orbit backup)
Mission: GOES 14 is a 3,200-kg weather satellite that is the latest in the series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites which carry an imager, sounder, a Space Environment Monitor (SEM) package, a solar X-ray imager, and SARSAT Search and Rescue ground-data relaying equipment. It was placed in orbit originally as a spare.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 613 ; Spacewarn No. 668 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; NOAA's 27 Jun 09 ; Spaceflight Now’s 2013 Stories ;
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Sirius FM5
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #54 ; 2009-034A ; 6,779th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Sirius XM
Launch: 30 June 2009 at 19h10 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at  96° West longitude.
Mission: Sirius FM5 is a communications spacecraft that enables S-band digital radio broadcasts (music, news and entertainment) to motorists in North America. The satellite has a design lifetime of 15 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 613 ; Spacewarn No. 668 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Terrestar 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #55 ; 2009-035A ; 6,780th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Mobile Phone)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Terrestar Corp.
Launch: 1st July 2009 at 17h52 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostarionary at 111° West longitude,
Mission: TerreStar 1 is a 6,910-kg communications satellite that provides North American customers voice, data and video transmission via handheld devices. The satellite has a design lifetime of 15 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 613 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Arianespace's Press kit
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Kosmos 2451
Spacecraft: Strela-3
Chronologies: 2009 payload #56 ; 2009-036A ; 6,781st spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 6 July 2009 at 1h26 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133?, by a Rockot.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 613 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Kosmos 2452
Spacecraft: Strela-3
Chronologies: 2009 payload #57 ; 2009-036B ; 6,782nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 6 July 2009 at 1h26 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133?, by a Rockot.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 613 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Kosmos 2453
Spacecraft: Strela-3
Chronologies: 2009 payload #58 ; 2009-036C ; 6,783rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 6 July 2009 at 1h26 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133?, by a Rockot.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 613 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Razaksat
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #59 ; 2009-037A ; 6,784th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Malaysia
Launch: 14 July 2009 at 3h36 UTC, from Omelek I, by a Falcon 1.
Orbit:
Mission: RazakSat is 180-kg remote sensing satellite that carries a 2.5-meter resolution panchromatic imager and a 5-meter resolution color imager. The data are used for land management, resource development and conservation, forestry and fish migration.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 613 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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STS-127 / ISS 2J/A
Spacecraft: Space Shuttle's 127th flight, Endeavour's 23rd flight and 29th Shuttle flight to ISS.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #60 ; 2009-038A ; 6,785th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 15 July 2009 at 22h03 UTC, from the Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit:
Mission: STS-127 is a crew transport craft carrying seven astronauts. The Orbiter docked with the International Space Station (ISS) on 17 July 2009 at 17:47 UT. The primary objective of the 16-day mission was to install the final components of the Japanese Kibo module to the ISS. During five spacewalks, astronauts installed and equipped the new component to the Kibo and replaced aging batteries and installed spare parts on the ISS. It also delivered a new crew member to the ISS (Kopra) and returned another to Earth (Wakata). The mission concluded with a landing at Cape Canaveral on 31 July 2009 at 14:48 UT.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 613 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; NASA's STS-127  & Press Kit ;
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Kosmos 2454
Spacecraft: Parus
Chronologies: 2009 payload #61 ; 2009-039A ; 6,786th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation/Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 21 July 2009 at 3h57 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-132/1, by a Kosmos-3M.
Orbit: Circular at 940 km x 82.96° x 104 min.
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 614 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSNF's 21 Jul 09
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Sterkh 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #62 ; 2009-039B ; 6,787th spacecraft.
Type: Search and Rescue
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor:
Launch: 21 July 2009 at 3h57 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-132/1, by a Kosmos-3M.
Orbit: Circular at 940 km x 82.96° x 104 min.
Mission: Sterkh 1 is a 160-kg civilian search and rescue beacon relay satellite which is part of Russia's contribution to the COSPAS-SARSAT international satellite system. The satellite detects distress beacon signals from land, sea and air, determine their location, and relay the information to emergency officials.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 614Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSNF's 21 Jul 09 ;
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Progress M-67 / ISS 34P
Spacecraft: Progress M (7K-TGM) No. 
Chronologies: 2009 payload #63 ; 2009-040A ; 6,788th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 24 July 2009 at 10h57 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1/5, by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Initial: 192.6 km x 253.4 km x 51.64° x 88.7 min.
Mission: Progress M-67 is a resupply craft for the International Space Station.  About 2.6 tons of cargo were on-board, included 2.3 tonnes of propellant, water, oxygen and dry goods including spare parts, scientific equipment and parcels. The docking with the ISS took place on 29 July 2009 at 11h12 UT under manual control when the automated system placed the craft in the wrong orientation. Progress M-67 undocked from the aft Zvezda port on 21 September at 7h25 UTC. After several days of free flight, the craft was deorbited over the Pacific Ocean on 27 September 2009 at 9h33 UTC.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 614, 616 & 617 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSC Energia's 24 Jul 09 & 29 Jul 09 ;
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Deimos 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #64 ; 2009-041A ; 6,789th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Imaging
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Spain's Deimos Space Sl
Launch: 29 July 2009 at 18h46 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 634 km x 677 km
Mission: Deimos 1 is a 90-kg remote sensing satellite that gathers wide-angle, medium-resolution images. It joins the international Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC), a fleet of small Earth-watching satellites designed to provide quick-response imagery to emergency managers worldwide. DMC images are also used for mapping, urban planning and resource management.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 614 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Dubaisat-1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #65 ; 2009-041B ; 6,790th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Imaging
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Dubai's Emirates Institute of Advanced Science and Technology
Launch: 29 July 2009 at 18h46 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 665 km x 681 km
Mission: DubaiSat 1 is a 190-kg remote sensing satellite that carries an optical imaging camera with a black-and-white resolution of about 2.5 meters and a color resolution of 5 meters. The data are used for urban development, scientific research, telecommunications, transportation, construction and mapping applications, as well as for forecasting, water quality research and engineering tests.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 614 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSNF's 29 Jul 09
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DMC-2 / UK-DMC 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #66 ; 2009-041C ; 6,791st spacecraft.
Type: Earth Imaging
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: United Kingdom's DMC International Imaging
Launch: 29 July 2009 at 18h46 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 623 km x 677 km
Mission: DMC 2, a 96.5 kg remote sensing satellite also known as UK-DMC 2, to gather wide-angle, medium-resolution images. It joins the international Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC), a fleet of small Earth-watching satellites designed to provide quick-response imagery to emergency managers worldwide. DMC images are also used for mapping, urban planning, and resource management.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 614 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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AprizeSat 4
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #69 ; 2009-041D ; 6,792nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. SpaceQuest
Launch: 29 July 2009 at 18h46 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 606 km x 677 km
Mission: AprizeSat 4 is a 12-kg communications satellite that provides tracking and data monitoring services for companies with remote or mobile assets. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 614 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Nanosat-1B
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #67 ; 2009-041E ; 6,793rd spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Spanish space agency INTA
Launch: 29 July 2009 at 18h46 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 586 km x 677 km
Mission: Nanosat 1B is a 50-cm diameter, 22-kg testbed for the Spanish space agency to  demonstrate basic space technologies.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 614 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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AprizeSat 3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #68 ; 2009-041F ; 6,794th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. SpaceQuest
Launch: 29 July 2009 at 18h46 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 565 km x 677 km
Mission: AprizeSat 3 is a 12-kg communications satellite that provides tracking and data monitoring services for companies with remote or mobile assets. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 614 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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DRAGONSat - AggieSat 2
Spacecraft: DRAGONSat stands for Dual RF Astrodynamic GPS Orbital Navigator Satellite.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #70 ; 2009-038B ; 6,795th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/students (technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Texas A&M University students
Launch: 15 July 2009 at 22h03 UTC, from the Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle. Deployed from Endeavour 30 July 2009 at 12h34.
Orbit: 325 km x 332 km
Mission: DRAGONSatis a pair of picosatellites (AggieSat 2 and PARADIGM/BEVO 1). The mission of DRAGONSat is to provide data useful for the independent rendezvous of spacecraft in orbit using GPS data. Each satellite is a 13 cm cube weighing about 3 kg. The satellites will collect several orbits of position data from both hemispheres by testing a new NASA GPS receiver (DRAGON) aboard the satellites, and then downlink the data to a ground station.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 614 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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DRAGONSat - PARADIGM/BEVO
Spacecraft: DRAGONSat stands for Dual RF Astrodynamic GPS Orbital Navigator Satellite.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #71 ; 2009-038B ; 6,796th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/students (technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Texas A&M University students
Launch: 15 July 2009 at 22h03 UTC, from the Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle. Deployed from Endeavour 30 July 2009 at 12h34.
Orbit:
Mission: DRAGONSatis a pair of picosatellites (AggieSat 2 and PARADIGM/BEVO 1).The mission of DRAGONSat is to provide data useful for the independent rendezvous of spacecraft in orbit using GPS data. Each satellite is a 13 cm cube weighing about 3 kg. The satellites will collect several orbits of position data from both hemispheres by testing a new NASA GPS receiver (DRAGON) aboard the satellites, and then downlink the data to a ground station.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 614 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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ANDE Passive (Pollux)
Spacecraft: ANDE stands for Atmospheric Neutral Density Experiment.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #72 ; 2009-038E ; 6,797th spacecraft.
Type: Science & Yechnology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 15 July 2009 at 22h03 UTC, from the Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle. Deployed from Endeavour 30 July 2009 at 17h23.
Orbit:
Mission: ANDE 2 is a pair of microsatellites (Castor and Pollux) with mission's objective to measure the density and composition of the rarified atmosphere at low-Earth orbit while being tracked from the ground. The data will be used to better predict the movement and decay of objects in orbit. The two spherical satellites are each 48 cm in diameter but have different masses (25 and 50 kg). Because of the difference in mass, the satellites will drift apart over time. Observing the satellites' position will provide a study on spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric drag associated with geomagnetic activity. The surface of both spheres contains an embedded array of sensors including 30 retroreflectors, six laser diodes for tracking, and six photovoltaic cells for determining orientation and spin rate. Both spheres also have thermal monitor systems. The lighter satellite is Pollux and the heavier is Castor. The Castor spacecraft carries active instruments: a miniature wind and temperature spectrometer to measure atmospheric composition, cross-track winds, and neutral temperature; a Global Positioning Sensor; and an electrostatic analyzer to monitor plasma density spacecraft charging. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 614 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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ANDE Active (Castor)
Spacecraft: ANDE stands for Atmospheric Neutral Density Experiment.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #73 ; 2009-038F ; 6,798th spacecraft.
Type: Science & Yechnology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 15 July 2009 at 22h03 UTC, from the Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle. Deployed from Endeavour 30 July 2009 at 17h23.
Orbit:
Mission: ANDE 2 is a pair of microsatellites (Castor and Pollux) with mission's objective to measure the density and composition of the rarified atmosphere at low-Earth orbit while being tracked from the ground. The data will be used to better predict the movement and decay of objects in orbit. The two spherical satellites are each 48 cm in diameter but have different masses (25 and 50 kg). Because of the difference in mass, the satellites will drift apart over time. Observing the satellites' position will provide a study on spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric drag associated with geomagnetic activity. The surface of both spheres contains an embedded array of sensors including 30 retroreflectors, six laser diodes for tracking, and six photovoltaic cells for determining orientation and spin rate. Both spheres also have thermal monitor systems. The lighter satellite is Pollux and the heavier is Castor. The Castor spacecraft carries active instruments: a miniature wind and temperature spectrometer to measure atmospheric composition, cross-track winds, and neutral temperature; a Global Positioning Sensor; and an electrostatic analyzer to monitor plasma density spacecraft charging. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 614 ; Spacewarn No. 669 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Asiasat 5
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #74 ; 2009-042A ; 6,799th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Hong Kong's Asiasat
Launch: 11 August 2009 at 19h47 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-39/200, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geonstationary at 100.5° East longitude.
Mission: AsiaSat 5 is a communications satellite that provides services to customers in East and South Asia. It carries 14 Ku-band and 26 C-band transponders and has an expected life span of 15 years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 615 ; Spacewarn No. 670 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Navstar 60 (USA 206)
Spacecraft: Navstar SVN-50 / GPS IIR-21
Chronologies: 2009 payload #75 ; 2009-043A ; 6,800th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 17 August 2009 at 10h35 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-17A, by a Delta II 7925.
Orbit:
Mission: Navstar 64 is a navigational satellite in the GPS fleet.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 615 ; Spacewarn No. 670 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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JCSAT 12 / JCSAT R-A
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #76 ; 2009-044A ; 6,801st spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Japan's SKY Perfect JSAT Corporation
Launch: 21 August 2009 at 22h09 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostarionary (in-orbit backup)
Mission: JCSAT 12 is a 4,000-kg communications satellite that carries 30 Ku-band and 12 C-band transponders serving Japan, the Asia-Pacific region, and Hawaii. The satellite will serve as a backup and will be renamed JCSAT R-A once it is operational. It has an expected life span of 15 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 615 ; Spacewarn No. 670 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Arianespace's Press Kit
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Optus D3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #77 ; 2009-044B ; 6,802nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Australia's Optus
Launch: 21 August 2009 at 22h09 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geosynchronous at 156° East longitude. 
Mission: Optus D3 is a 2,500-kg communications satellite that provides communications and direct-to-home television transmissions. The satellite carries 24 Ku-band transponders and has an expected life span of 15 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 615 ; Spacewarn No. 670 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Arianespace's Press Kit
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STSAT-2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #78 ; 2009 2nd loss ; 6,803rd spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: South Korea
Launch: 25 August 2009 at 8h00 UTC, from Naro, by a Naro KSLV-1.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: The first launch of South Korea's KSLV-1 'Naro' rocket ended in failure with the reentry of the STSAT-2 satellite payload over the Pacific. Early reports suggest that the Russian-built Angara first stage operated correctly, and the Korean solid-motor second stage also fired, but half of the payload fairing failed to separate. STSAT-2 reached 387 km in altitude, but the extra mass of the fairing prevented the system from reaching orbital velocity.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 615 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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STS-128 / ISS 17A
Spacecraft: Space Shuttle's 128th flight, Discovery's' 37th flight and 30th Shuttle flight to ISS.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #79 ; 2009-045A ; 6,804th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceflight
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 29 August 2009 at 4h00 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit: At docking: 341.7 km x 353.9 km x 51.64° x 91.49 min 
Mission: STS-128 is a crew transport craft carrying seven astronaut. The Orbiter docked with the International Space Station on 31 August 2009 at 0h54 UT. The Orbiter carried the Leonardo Multi Purpose Logistics Module which, when temporarily attached to the station, enabled transfer of 6,894 kg of supplies and scientific equipment. During three spacewalks, astronauts replaced an ammonia coolant storage tank, retrieve experiments mounted on the exterior of the European Columbus module and prepare the station for the next module expected to arrive with STS-130 in early 2010. The mission also delivered a new crew member (Stott) to the ISS and returned another to Earth (Kopra). Discovery landed on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base on 12 September at 0h53 UTC.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 615 & 616 ; Spacewarn No. 670 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; NASA's STS-128  & Press Kit ;
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Palapa D
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #80 ; 2009-046A ; 6,805th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Indonesia's Indosat Co.
Launch: 31 August 2009 at 9h28 UTC, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3B.
Orbit: Initial: 220 km x 21,150 km x 22.3°
Geosynchronoue
Mission: The Palapa D satellite provides satellite links and broadcasting services for Indonesia and other southeastern Asian nations. But it first failed to enter its geosynchronous orbit after being launched bu a Chinese Long March 3B rocket. The first and second stages of the rocket functioned normally, but the third stage failed during a second-time ignition. Experts are investigating. The satellite was thus stranding into a transfert orbit of roughly 220 x 21,150 km. But finally, the satellite was able to enter its geosynchronous orbit on 9 September 2009.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 615; Spacewarn No. 670 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; China Daily's 31 Aug 09, 1 Sep 09, 2 Sep 09 & 13 Sep 09 ;
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PAN / P360 (USA 207)
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #81 ; 2009-047A ; 6,806th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 8 September 2009 at 21h35 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-41, by an Atlas V 401.
Orbit: Geostationary at 34° East longitude.
Mission: PAN is a Lockheed Martin A2100 satellite described as being for "a US Government customer". It seems that LM operates the satellite on behalf of the unidentified agency. It may be a satellite providing services for the CIA replacing channels hosted on the US Navy's UHF/EHF communications network, to bridge the gap between the old UHF Follow-On series and the planned MUOS system.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 615 & 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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HTV 1
Spacecraft: HTV stands for H-II Transfer Vehicle.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #82 ; 2009-048A ; 6,807th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 10 September 2009 at 17h01 UTC, from Tanegashima Space Center's Y2, by a H-IIB.
Orbit: Initial: 185 km x 301 km x 51.6°
On docking: 340.7 km x 353.3 km x 51.64° x 91.48 min.
Mission: HTV 1 is a re-supply vehicle that delivered 4.5 tonnes of both pressurized and unpressurized cargo to the International Space Station. The pressurized cargo includes food, computer equipment and other supplies. The cargo intended for use on the ISS Kibo exposed science facility include the NASA HREP instrument for studies of the ocean and atmosphere and the JAXA SMILES instrument to study the ozone layer. On 17 September 2009 the HTV 1 was captured by the ISS and docked to the Harmony module. HTV-1 approached to within 10 meters of the Harmony module, and the Canadarm-2 grappled it and berthed it to Harmony's nadir port. The SMILES and HREP experiments were transferred to the Kibo Exposed Facility on 24 September 2009.
     This launch marks the first launch of the H-IIB rocket, which has a larger diameter first stage than the old H-IIA, with two LE-5A main engines instead of one, and four large SRB-A strapons instead of two.
     HTV-1 cargo vehicle leftd the Station on 30 October 2009 at 17h31 UTC and deorbited on 1 November 2009 at 21h25 UTC over South Pacific.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 615, 616 & 618 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Meteor M1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #83 ; 2009-049A ; 6,808th spacecraft.
Type: Meteorology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russia Hydrometeorological Service
Launch: 17 September 2009 at 15h55 UTC, from Baikonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat.
Orbit: 814 km x 820 km  x 98.8°
Mission: Meteor-M1 is a 2,700-kg meteorology satellite designed to gather data for weather forecasts, to monitor the Earth's ozone layer and radiation conditions in the upper atmosphere, as well as to provide information on ice floes for maritime shipping in the polar regions. Replacing the old Meteor-3M satellite, the upgraded satellite carries a new generation of weather instruments for the Russian Hydrometeorological Service and is built by VNII EM. The satellite carries six instruments including imagers, sounders and a radar. It will have a service life of five years and will operate in a polar orbit at an altitude of 830 km.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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BLITS
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #84 ; 2009-049G ; 6,809th spacecraft.
Type: Geodesy
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 17 September 2009 at 15h55 UTC, from Baikonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat.
Orbit: 814 km x 820 km  x 98.8°
Mission: BLITS is a 7.5-kg spherical satellite that is covered in polished glass to be used as a retroreflector for laser ranging experiments. It was built by NII Pretsizionnogo Priborostroeniya (NIIPP) of Moscow.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Sterkh 2
Spacecraft: Sterkh No. 12L
Chronologies: 2009 payload #85 ; 2009-049B ; 6,810th spacecraft.
Type: Search and Rescue
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Space Agency
Launch: 17 September 2009 at 15h55 UTC, from Baikonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat.
Orbit: 814 km x 820 km  x 98.8°
Mission: Sterkh 2 is the second dedicated civilian search-and-rescue satellite for the Russian Space Agency. It joins the COSPAS-SARSAT international satellite system which detect distress beacons and relay the information to emergency responders.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Universitetskiy 2 / Tatiana 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #86 ; 2009-049D ; 6,811th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Moscow State University
Launch: 17 September 2009 at 15h55 UTC, from Baikonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat.
Orbit: 814 km x 820 km  x 98.8°
Mission: Tatiana 2 is a 98-kg Russian education and technology demonstration microsatellite. It has UV and visual (red) photomultipliers, a scintillation detector and a spectrometer to study high energy transient events in Earth's atmosphere. Built by students at MGU (Moscow State University), Universitetskiy/Tat'yana-2 is a space physics research satellite.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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UGATUSAT
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #87 ; 2009-049E ; 6,812th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Earth Imaging)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russia's Ufa State Aviation Technical University.
Launch: 17 September 2009 at 15h55 UTC, from Baikonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat.
Orbit: 814 km x 820 km  x 98.8°
Mission: UGATUSAT is a 30-kg Russian education and technology demonstration microsatellite. The satellite makes Earth observations with a resolution of 50 meters.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Sumbandila / SumbandilaSat
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #88 ; 2009-049F ; 6,813th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: South Africa
Launch: 17 September 2009 at 15h55 UTC, from Baikonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat.
Orbit: 490 km x 504 km x 98.8°
Mission: Sumbandila is a 81-kg South African remote sensing satellite. Data from the satellite are used for agriculture monitoring, infrastructure mapping, disaster response, population measurement, and water management. The primary instrument on board is a multispectral imager with a resolution of 6.25 meters.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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IRIS
Spacecraft: IRIS stands for Inflatable and Rigidizable Structure
Chronologies: 2009 payload #89 ; 2009-049C ; 6,814th spacecraft.
Type: Commercial Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Lavochkin/Astrium
Launch: 17 September 2009 at 15h55 UTC, from Baikonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat.
Orbit: 490 km x 504 km x 98.8°
Mission: Fregat/IRIS a is Russian technology demonstration satellite that consists of two inflatable panels mounted on the Fregat upper stage. IRIS is a test of inflatable structure technology, two rigidizing masts carrying dummy solar arrays, for Lavochkin/Astrium.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Nimiq-5
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #90 ; 2009-050A ; 6,815th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Telesat Canada
Launch: 17 September 2009 at 19h19 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-39/200, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geosynchronous at 72.7° West longitude.
Mission: Nimiq 5 is a 4,745-kg commercial communications satellite that carries 32 Ku-band transponders to beam direct-to-home programming to North America. The satellite has a 15 year design lifetime.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Oceansat-2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #91 ; 2009-051A ; 6,816th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO)
Launch: 23 September 2009 at 6h51 UTC, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC) SHAR First Launch Pad, by a PSLV.
Orbit: Circular at 720 km x 98.28° x 99.31 min.
Mission: Oceansat-2 is a 960-kg Indian Earth remote sensing satellite, India's 16th remote sensing satellite. It carries three payloads and has the shape of a cuboid with two solar panels projecting from its sides. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; ISRO's 23 Sep 09 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; ISRO's 23 Sep 09
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UWE-2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #92 ; 2009-051 ; 6,817th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Universität Würzburg, Germany
Launch: 23 September 2009 at 6h51 UTC, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, by a PSLV.
Orbit: Circular at 720 km x 98.28° x 99.31 min.
Mission: UWE 2, a 1-kg cubesat, is intended to demonstrate a new Attitude Determination and Control System and the use of GPS on a cubesat;
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; ISRO's 23 Sep 09 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; ISRO's 23 Sep 09
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BEESAT
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #93 ; 2009-051 ; 6,818th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Technische Universität Berlin, Germany
Launch: 23 September 2009 at 6h51 UTC, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, by a PSLV-CA.
Orbit: Circular at 720 km x 98.28° x 99.31 min.
Mission: BeeSat is a 1-kg cubesat for on-orbit verification of newly developed micro reaction wheels for pico satellite applications and to demonstrate the use of coin sized micro reaction wheels for attitude control of pico satellites in orbit as one of the key elements
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; ISRO's 23 Sep 09
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ITU-p-SAT 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #94 ; 2009-051 ; 6,819th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Istanbul Technical University, Turkey
Launch: 23 September 2009 at 6h51 UTC, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, by a PSLV-CA.
Orbit: Circular at 720 km x 98.28° x 99.31 min.
Mission: ITU-pSAT1 is a 1-kg cubesat to examine the performance of an on-board passive stability system consisting of a magnet which will align the satellite to the magnetic field of the Earth with an error of about 15 degrees according to simulations, and to verify this figure. A secondary objective is to download photographs taken using a camera with a resolution of 640 x 480 pixels
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; ISRO's 23 Sep 09 ;
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SwissCube
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #95 ; 2009-051 ; 6,820th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
Launch: 23 September 2009 at 6h51 UTC, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, by a PSLV-CA.
Orbit: Circular at 720 km x 98.28° x 99.31 min.
Mission: SwissCube is a 1-kg cubesat which house a science payload and take optical measurements and characterize the airglow intensity over selected latitudes and longitudes thereby demonstrating that the airglow emissions are strong enough to be measured by an off-the-shelf detector and validating the concept for the development of a low-cost Earth sensor.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; ISRO's 23 Sep 09
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Rubin-9.1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #96 ; 2009-051F ; 6,821st spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Luxspace
Launch: 23 September 2009 at 6h51 UTC, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, by a PSLV-CA.
Orbit: Circular at 720 km x 98.28° x 99.31 min.
Mission: Rubin-9 consists of two spacecrafts Rubin-9.1 and Rubin-9.2, weighing 8 kg each. They are primarilyused for the Automatic Identification System (AIS) for Maritime applications. The two spacecraft remained attached to the fourth stage of the PSLV booster. Rubin-9.1 has a mission objective of providing an insight into the issue of message collisions that limit detection in areas of dense shipping.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; ISRO's 23 Sep 09
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Rubin-9.2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #97 ; 2009-051G ; 6,822nd spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ÅAC Microtec 
Launch: 23 September 2009 at 6h51 UTC, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, by a PSLV-CA.
Orbit: Circular at 720 km x 98.28° x 99.31 min.
Mission: Rubin-9 consists of two spacecrafts Rubin-9.1 and Rubin-9.2, weighing 8 kg each. They are primarilyused for the Automatic Identification System (AIS) for Maritime applications. The two spacecraft remained attached to the fourth stage of the PSLV booster. The main purpose of Rubin-9.2 is to test and qualify nano technologies from Angstrom company and to continue space based maritime Automatic Identification System (AIS) receiver experiments (started with Rubin-7 and Rubin-8 missions). Rubin-9.2 is similar to the Rubin-8 launched in April 2008.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; ISRO's 23 Sep 09
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STSS Demo 1 (USA 208)
Spacecraft: STSS Demo stands for Space Tracking and Surveillance System Demonstrator mission.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #98 ; 2009-052A ; 6,823rd spacecraft.
Type: Space Defense
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Missile Defense Agency
Launch: 25 September 2009 at 12h20 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-17, by a Delta II 7920.
Orbit: 1,350 km x 1,350 km x 58°
Mission: STSS Demo uses sensors on the two spacecraft to track ballistic missiles. Built by Northrop Grumman for the US Missile Defense Agency, the 1,000-kg satellites monitor missile flights using infrared sensors. They have a two-year mission life and four-year design life.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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STSS Demo 2 (USA 209)
Spacecraft: STSS Demo stands for Space Tracking and Surveillance System Demonstrator mission.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #99 ; 2009-052A ; 6,824th spacecraft.
Type: Space Defense
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Missile Defense Agency
Launch: 25 September 2009 at 12h20 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-17, by a Delta 7920.
Orbit: 1,350 km x 1,350 km x 58°
Mission: STSS Demo uses sensors on the two spacecraft to track ballistic missiles .Built by Northrop Grumman for the US Missile Defense Agency, the 1,000-kg satellites monitor missile flights using infrared sensors.  They have a two-year mission life and four-year design life.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 616 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ;
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Soyuz TMA-16 / ISS 20S
Spacecraft: Soyuz 11F732 (7K-STMA) No. 226
Chronologies: 2009 payload #100 ; 2009-053A ; 6,825th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 30 September 2009 at 7h14 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1/5, by a Soyuz-FG.
Orbit: Initial: 200.7 km x 257.7 km x 51.63° x 88.79 min.
At docking: 340.2 km x 351.5 km x 51.64° x 91.45 min. 
Landing: 18 March 2010 at 11h24 UTC.
Mission: Soyuz TMA-16 is a crew transport craft which carried a Russian cosmonaut (Suraev), an American astronaut (Williams) and a Canadian tourist (Laliberté) to the International Space Station. The spacecraft docked with the Station on 2 October 2009 at 8h35 UTC. This mission replace two of the crew members of the ISS.
     On 18 March 2010, the Soyuz TMA-16 undocked from its MRM2 port at 8h03 TU, and landed successfully in the snow-bound steppes of southern Kazakhstan northeast of the town of Arkalyk, with the crew in excellent condition. The descent capsule toppled on its side. The crew was flown out nominally to the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center at Zvesdniy Gorodok (Star City).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 617 & 625 ; Spacewarn No. 671 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; NASA's Expedition 21 & Press Kit ; RSC Energia's 30 Sep 09, 2 Oct 09 & Expedition 21/22 ; ISS On-orbit 18 Mar 10 ;
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Amazonas 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #101 ; 2009-054A ; 6,826th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Hispasat
Launch: 1 October 2009 at 21h59 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 61° West longitude. 
Mission: Amazonas 2 is a 5,400-kg communications satellite from Spain that carries 54 Ku-band and 10 C-band transponders providing service to customers in North, Central and South America.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 617 ; Spacewarn No. 672 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Arianespace's Press Kit
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COMSATBw-1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #102 ; 2009-054B ; 6,827th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: German Ministry of Defense
Launch: 1 October 2009 at 21h59 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 63° East longitude.
Mission: COMSATBW 1 is a 2,440-kg military communications satellite that provides voice and data relay, video and multimedia broadcasting.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 617 ; Spacewarn No. 672 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Arianespace's Press Kit
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WorldView-2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #103 ; 2009-055A ; 6,828th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Imaging
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: DigitalGlobe
Launch: 8 October 2009 at 18h51 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Station's SLC-2W, by a Delta II 7920.
Orbit: 766 km x 768 km x 98.6° 
Mission: Worldview 2 is a 2,800-kg commercial imaging satellite capaable of providing Earth imagery in eight color bands. The data will be at 0.5 meters resolution for panchromatic images and 1.8 meter for multi-spectral images
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 617 ; Spacewarn No. 672 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Progress M-03M / ISS 35P
Spacecraft: Progress M (7K-TGM) No. 
Chronologies: 2009 payload #104 ; 2009-056A ; 6,829th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 15 October 2009 at 1h14 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1/5, by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Initial: 189.6 km x 238.7 km x 51.68°x 88.53 min
At docking: 339.6 km x 51.64° x 91.43 min.
Deorbit On 27 April 2010.
Mission: Progress M-03M is a resupply vessel for the International Space Station that was carrying approximately 2.4 tons  of supplies for the ISS. These supplies include spare parts, life support gear and equipment as well as propellant and water. The cargo ship docked to the Earth-facing port on the Pirs module on 18 October 2009 at 1h40 UT.
     Progress M-03M undocked from the Pirs module on 22 April 2010 at 16h29 UT. It then carried out the 'Radar-Progress' experiment using the propulsion system to locally perturb the ionosphere. On 27 April 2010, Finally, having completed all maneuver burns in support of the “Radar” experiment, the vehicle performed a nominal deorbit burn on 27 April at 18h07 UT and re-entered the atmosphere for destruction over the Pacific Ocean.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 617, 627 ; Spacewarn No. 672 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSC Energia's 15 Oct 09 & 18 Oct 09 ; On-orbit 27 Apr 10 ;
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DMSP 5D-3 F-18 (USA 210)
Spacecraft: DMSP stands for Defense Meteorological Satellite Program 
Chronologies: 2009 payload #105 ; 2009-057A ; 6,830th spacecraft.
Type: Meteorology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 18 October 2009 at 16h12 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-3E, by an Atlas V 401.
Orbit: Near-polar, Sun-synchronous, 830 km.
Mission: DMSP-F18i is a 1,200-kg military weather satellite. It is one of several in the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program that provide terrestrial and space weather data. The DMSP satellites monitor the meteorological, oceanographic and solar-terrestrial physics environments. The primary weather sensor on DMSP is the Operational Linescan System, which provides continuous visual and infrared imagery of cloud cover. Additional satellite sensors measure atmospheric vertical profiles of moisture and temperature. DMSP satellites also measure space environmental parameters such as local charged particles and electromagnetic fields.
     The Atlas V 401 used in this launch have a lot of leftover capacity. it was thus used to perform tests on the Centaur AV-017 rocket and propel it into solar orbit.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 617 ; Spacewarn No. 672 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; USAF's 2 Oct 09 ;
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NSS 12
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #106 ; 2009-058A ; 6,831st spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: SES World Skies
Launch: 29 October 2009 at 20h00 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostarionary at 57° East longitude.
Mission: NSS 12 is a 5,624-kg communications satellite that provides telecommunications and direct-to-home broadcasting intended to serve commercial and government customers in Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia and Australia. The satellite has a 15-year design life-span and carries 48 Ku-band and 40 C-band transponders.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 617 ; Spacewarn No. 672; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Arianespace's Press Kit
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Thor 6
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #107 ; 2009-058B ; 6,832nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Telenor Satellite Broadcasting AS
Launch: 29 October 2009 at 20h00 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 1° West longitude.
Mission: Thor 6 is a 3,050-kg communications satellite that carries 36 Ku-band transponders to provide direct-to-home broadcasts to customers in Central and Eastern Europe and to provide increased capacity to the Nordic region.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 617 ; Spacewarn No. 672 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Arianespace's Press Kit
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SMOS
Spacecraft: SMOS stands for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity
Chronologies: 2009 payload #108 ; 2009-059A ; 6,833rd spacecraft.
Type: Earth Science
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: European Space Agency (ESA)

Credit :ESA
Launch: 2 November 2009 at 1h51 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome, by a Rokot.
Orbit: 758 km x 759 km x 98.4°
Mission: SMOS is a 658-kg satellite that monitors sea surface salinity and soil moisture on a global scale. SMOS data are used to build maps of salinity and moisture levels and contribute to global circulation models. Its primary instrument for the satellite is the L-band MIRAS (Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis) radiometer composed of a 69 element Y-shaped antenna array.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 618 ; Spacewarn No. 673 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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PROBA-2
Spacecraft: PROBA stands for Project for On-Board Autonomy.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #109 ; 2009-059B ; 6,834th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: European Space Agency (ESA)
Launch: 2 November 2009 at 1h51 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome, by a Rokot.
Orbit: 709 KM x 728 km x 98.4°
Mission: PROBA 2 is a 130-kg technology demonstrator satellite that carries two Belgian solar physics instruments (SWAP, LYRA) and two Czech plasma physics instruments (TPMU, DSLP) to demonstrate 17 advanced satellite technologies including star trackers, sun sensors, a camera, magnetometer, and others. SWAP, an Extreme UV telescope, is used to observe the solar corona. LYRA, is a solar radiometer observing in four ultraviolet bands. TPMU, the Thermal Plasma Measurement Unit, measures the ambient ion and electron temperature, the ion density, composition, and the floating potential of the satellite body. DSLP, the Dual Segmented Langmuir Probe, will study the plasma environment and how it varies with solar events.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 618 ; Spacewarn No. 673 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Progress M-SO2 / Progress M-MRM2
Spacecraft: Progress M-SO2 No. 302
Chronologies: 2009 payload #110 ; n/a ; 6,835th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo Carrier
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 10 November 2009 at 14h22 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1/5, by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Initial: 192,69 km x 251,69 km x 51,64° x 88,66 min.
At docking: 336.7 km x 345.5 km x 51.64° x 91.36 min.
Mission: Progress M-SO2, also known as Progress M-MRM2, is special-purpose cargo spacecraft that delivered the new Russian MRM2 (Mini Research Module 2) Poisk (“Search”) module to the International Sâce Station. It docket at the Zvezda space-facing (zenith) port of ISS under automatic KURS controlto on 12 November 2009 at 15h44 UT.
     On 8 December at 0h16 UTC, the Progress M-MIM2 separated from the Poisk, leaving the latter's docking port available for use by visiting vehicles. Three orbits later, at 4h48 UTC, the Progress main engine fired for its deorbit burn and reentered over the Pacific at 5h27 UTC. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 618 & 619 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSC Energia's 10 Nov 09 & 12 Nov 09 ;
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Poisk / MRM-2 / ISS-5R
Spacecraft: 240GK No. 2L
Poisk means "explore" in Russian; MRM-2 stands for Mini Research Module-2 (or MIM-2 in Russian for Maliy Issledovatel'ny Modul'-2).
Chronologies: 2009 payload #111 ; 2009-060A ; 6,836th spacecraft.
Type: Station Component
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 10 November 2009 at 14h22 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1/5, by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Part of the International Space Station.
Mission: Poisk is a Russian module for the International Space Station, It docked to the Zvezda space-facing port on 12 November 2009 at 15:41 UT. Poisk brought nearly 800 kg of cargo to the ISS and will serve as another docking port and airlock for the station. The MRM2, a copy of the DC1 “Pirs” Docking Compartment, will serve as an additional docking port for Soyuz and Progress spacecraft and as an airlock for spacewalks. Poisk will also provide extra space for scientific experiments as well as power-supply outlets and data-transmission interfaces for two external scientific payloads to be developed by the Russian Academy of Sciences. The mass of the module is 4,000 kg, its diameter 2.6 m and its length 4.6 m, providing 12.5 cubic meter of internal volume.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 618 & 619 ; Spacewarn No. 673 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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SJ-11-01 / Shijian 11-01
Spacecraft: SJ-11-01 means "Shijian shi yihao 01 xing", which can be translated as 'Practice Sat 11-01' or 'Experiment Sat 11-01'.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #112 ; 2009-061A ; 6,837th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 12 November 2009 at 2h45 UTC, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2C.
Orbit: 689 KM x 703 km x 98.3° 
Mission: Shijian 11-01 is intended for space science and engineering experiments.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 618 ; Spacewarn No. 673 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; China Daily's 13 Nov 09 ;
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STS-129 / ULF-3
Spacecraft: Space Shuttle's 129th flight, Atlantis' 31st flight and 31st Shuttle flight to ISS.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #113 ; 2009-062A ; 6,838th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 16 November 2009 at 19h28 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit: At docking: 336.3 km x 344.5 km x 51.64° x 91.34 min. 
Mission: STS 128 was a crew transport spacecraft carrying six astronauts and 12.36 tonnes of supplies for the International Space Station. The craft docked with the International Space Station on 18 November 2009 at 16:51 UT. The cargo included mostly spare parts for the ISS, much of which were mounted on the exterior of the ISS on two Express Logistics Carriers (ELC 1 and 2). The mission included three spacewalks and the return of one of the ISS crew members (Stott). The mission completed with a landing at Cape Canaveral on 27 November 2009 at 14h45 UT.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 618 ; Spacewarn No. 673 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; NASA's STS-129 & Press Kit
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Kosmos 2455
Spacecraft: Lotos-S
Chronologies: 2009 payload #114 ; 2009-063A ; 6,839th spacecraft.
Type: Electronic Intelligence
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense ministry
Launch: 20 November 2009 at 10h44 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-16/2, by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Initial: 200 km x 905 km x 67.2° x 96 min.
890 km x 905 km x 67.2° x 103 min.
Mission: Kosmos 2455 is a new generation electronic reconnaissance satellite of the Lotos-S type.  It has been reported that these satellites, with their not yet flown counterparts known as Pion, will work as part of the Liana electronic reconnaissance system. This system is being designed to replace the Tselina electronic intelligence and US-PU/Legenda naval reconnaissance systems. Lotos-S satellites are built by TsSKB-Progress Samara Space Center (Samara) and KB Arsenal (Sankt-Peterburg) for the Russian Defense Ministry.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 618 ; Spacewarn No. 673 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSNF's 20 Nov 09 ;
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Intelsat 14 / IS-14
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #115 ; 2009-064A ; 6,840th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Intelsat Ltd.
Launch: 23 November 2009 at 6h55 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-41, by an Atlas V 431.
Orbit: Geostarionary at 45° West longitude.
Mission: Intelsat 14 is a 5,663-kg communications satellite that provides television and data to customers in North and South America, Africa and Europe. The satellite carries 40 C-band and 22 Ku-band transponders. Built by Space Systems/Loral, IS-14 provides high-powered data services through its C- and Ku-band payload to Intelsat customers throughout Latin America, Europe and Africa. The spacecraft also carries a hosted payload for the Internet Router in Space, or IRIS program, for Cisco, which merge communications received on various frequency bands and transmit them to multiple users. Once it is operational, it will replace Intelsat’s 1R satellite, providing customers with capacity that has a useful life slated to last the next 16 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 618 ; Spacewarn No. 673 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Intelsat's 23 Nov 09 ;
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Eutelsat W7
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #116 ; 2009-065A ; 6,841st spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Eutelsat
Launch: 24 November 2009 at 14h19 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-200/39, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 36° East longitude.
Mission: Eutelsat W7 is a communications satellite that carries 70 Ku-band transponders to serve customers in Europe, Russia, Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia with digital broadcast and direct-to-home video. W7 enables Eutelsat to double the bandwidth available for digital video and telecommunications services in those regions. The satellite is co-positioned with the W4 satellite at 36 degrees East, where it replaces SESAT 1. 36 degrees East has become a key orbital location for TV broadcasting in Russia, the CIS, Central Asia and Africa, with more than 450 TV channels broadcast to those regions as of late 2009. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 618 ; Spacewarn No. 673 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Eutelsat's 24 Nov 09 ;
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IGS O-3 / IGS 5A
Spacecraft: IGS stands for Information Gathering Satellite, Optical-3 vehicle.
Chronologies: 2009 payload #117 ; 2009-066A ; 6,842nd spacecraft.
Type: Earth Imaging
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Japan Defense Ministry (Cabinet Satellite Intelligence Center)
Launch: 28 November 2009 at 1h21 UTC, from Tanegashima, by H-2A.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 619 ; Spacewarn No. 673 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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Intelsat 15 / IS-15
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #118 ; 2009-067A ; 6,843rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Intelsat Ltd.
Launch: 30 November 2009 at 21h00 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-45/1, by a Zenit-3SLB.
Orbit: Geosynchronous at 85° East longitude
Mission: Intelsat 15 is a communications satellite that provides data and video services for customers in Russia, the Middle East and in the vicinity of the Indian Ocean. It carries 22 Ku-band transponders, five of them are owned by SKY Perfect JSAT Corp. Customers will use IS-15’s capacity to distribute in-demand services that include cellular backhaul, for wireless communications to remote locations; broadband networks for enterprise applications; IP trunking, for robust Internet connectivity; and video services, for DTH programming. Built by Orbital Sciences Corporation, the satelite will replace Intelsat’s 709 and is expected to have a useful life of at least 17 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 619 ; Spacewarn No. 673 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Intelsat's 30 Nov 09 ;
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WGS 3 (USA 211)
Spacecraft: WGS stands for Wideband Global Satcom 
Chronologies: 2009 payload #119 ; 2009-068A ; 6,844th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 6 December 2009 at 1h47 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-37B, by a Delta 4M+(5,4).
Orbit: Geosynchronous at 12° West longitude 
Mission: The 5,990-kg third Wideband Global Satcom that carries US Army-led X-band and Ka-band communications payloads to significantly increase the communications capabilities for troops in the field, allies and national leadership, to include the President.  The WGS satellites are important elements of a new high-capacity satellite communications system providing enhanced communications capabilities to America's troops around the world for the next decade and beyond. WGS enables more robust and flexible execution of command and control, communications computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance, as well as battle management and combat support information functions.  WGS 3, a Boeing 702-class satellite, is managed by the USAF and operated by Space Command/Schriever AFB. It joins the service's two other WGS satellites, which launched on October 2007 and April 2009.  The satellite will be positioned over the equator at around 12 degrees West longitude to provide satellite communications support to U.S. Southern Command, European Command, Africa Command, DoD, and the President. WGS-4 is currently scheduled to launch in 2011 from Cape Canaveral. Two additional satellites are planned to be launched after WGS-4 to bring the constellation to a total of six by 2013.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 619 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; USAF''s 9 Dec 09 l
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YW-7 / Yaogan Weixing 7
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #120 ; 2009-069A ; 6,845th spacecraft.
Type: Probably a Reconaissance (or maybe an Earth Remote Sensing)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 9 December 2009 at 8h42 UTC, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2D.
Orbit: 623 km x 659 km x 97.8° 
Mission: According to China sources, Yaogan VII is a remote-sensing satellite, to be mainly used for scientific experiment, land resources survey, crop yield estimates and disaster prevention and reduction, according to the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center. Yaogan weixing qihao' (Remote-Sensing Satellite Number 7) appears to be similar to YW-2 and YW-4, which are thought to have been imaging satellites.  The satellite was developed by the China Academy of Space Technology under the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corp."
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 619 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; China Daily's 9 Dec 09 ;
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Kosmos 2456
Spacecraft: Uragan-M No. 730 
Chronologies: 2009 payload #121 ; 2009-070A ; 6,846th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 14 December 2009 at 10h38 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81, by a Proton-M/DM2.
Orbit: 19,130 km x 19,140 km x 64.8°
Mission: One of the three Uragan-M satellites for the GLONASS navigation system. These three Glonass-M satellites joined the Glonass constellation that at that time consisted of 16 operational satellites. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 619 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSMF's 14 Dec 09 ;
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Kosmos 2457
Spacecraft: Uragan-M No. 733
Chronologies: 2009 payload #122 ; 2009-070B ; 6,847th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 14 December 2009 at 10h38 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81, by a Proton-M/DM2.
Orbit: 19,130 km x 19,140 km x 64.8°
Mission: One of the three Uragan-M satellites for the GLONASS navigation system. These three Glonass-M satellites joined the Glonass constellation that at that time consisted of 16 operational satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 619 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSMF's 14 Dec 09
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Kosmos 2458
Spacecraft: Uragan-M No. 734
Chronologies: 2009 payload #123 ; 2009-070C ; 6,848th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 14 December 2009 at 10h38 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81, by a Proton-M/DM2.
Orbit: 19,130 km x 19,140 km x 64.8°
Mission: One of the three Uragan-M satellites for the GLONASS navigation system. These three Glonass-M satellites joined the Glonass constellation that at that time consisted of 16 operational satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 619 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSMF's 14 Dec 09
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WISE
Spacecraft: WISE stands for Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer
Chronologies: 2009 payload #124 ; 2009-071A ; 6,849th spacecraft.
Type: Astronomy
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 14 December 2009 at 14h09 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-2W, by a Delta II 7320.
Orbit: 524 km x 533 km x 97,5°
Mission: WISE is an astronomical satellite to observe the entire infrared sky  with sensitivity and resolution far better than the last infrared sky survey, performed 26 years ago. The space telescope will spend nine months scanning the sky once, then one-half the sky a second time. The primary mission will end when WISE's frozen hydrogen runs out, about 10 months after launch. WISE will catalog sources 100 times fainter than either previous satellite. The spacecraft has a 40cm telescope cooled to 12K by a cryostat filled with solid hydrogen.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 619 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; NASA's WISE & 14 Dec 09 ; NASA's 2010-2014 News Releases ; Spaceflight Now’s 2013 Stories ;
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YW-8 / Yaogan Weixing 8
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #125 ; 2009-072A ; 6,850th spacecraft.
Type: Probably a Reconaissance (or maybe an Earth Remote Sensing)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 15 December 2009 at 2h31 UTC, from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4C.
Orbit: 1192 km x 1204 km x 100.5° sun-synchronous
Mission: According to China press, Yaogan VIII is a remote-sensing satellite. Byt YW-8 is probably a low resolution imaging satellite, either for civilian Earth resource studies or military weather forecasting; Western analysts have suspected that previous YW satellites had an at least partly military mission. YW-8 was placed into a new orbital regime for Chinese satellites. It is probably a low resolution imaging satellite.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 619 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; China Daily's 16 Dec 09 ;
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XW 1 / Xi Wang 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #126 ; 2009-072B ; 6,851st spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/student
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 15 December 2009 at 2h31 UTC, from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4C.
Orbit:
Mission: 'Hope I' is a minisatellite which will be used for the China's young people to experience aerospace science and technology.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 619 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; China Daily's 16 Dec 09 ;
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Helios 2B 
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #127 ; 2009-073A ; 6,852nd spacecraft.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: French Ministry of Defense
(Direction Générales pour l'Armement, DGA)
Launch: 18 Decenber 2009 at 16h26 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 GS.
Orbit: 680 km Xun-synchronous polar orbit
Mission: Helios 2B ia a 4,200 kg reconnaissance satellite based on the SPOT remote sensing satellites.  Built by EADS Astrium, it is the second satellite in the second-generation spaceborne observation system for security and defense applications, conducted by France in conjunction with Belgium, Spain, Italy and Greece. The program manager is French defense procurement agency DGA, part of the French Ministry of Defense, which has assigned contracting authority for the space segment to the French space agency CNES.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 620 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; Arianespace's Press Kit
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Soyuz TMA-17 / ISS 21S
Spacecraft: Soyuz 11F732A17 (7K-STMA) No. 227
Chronologies: 2009 payload #128 ; 2009-074A ; 6,853rd spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency

Credit: NASA
Launch: 20 December 2009 at 21h52 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome LC-1, by Soyuz-FG.
Orbit: Initial: 199.8 km x 260.12 km x 51.65° x 88.8 min.
At docking: 333.7 km x 344.7 km x 51.64° x 91.32 min.
Landing: 2 June 2010  at 3h25 UT.
Mission: Soyuz TMA-17 is a crew transport craft which carried Russian cosmonaut (Kotov), a Japanese astronaut (Noguchi) and an American astronaut (Creamer). The craft docked docked with the nadir port on Zarya on 22 December 2009 at 22h48 UTC. Together wiith the Soyuz TM-16 crew, they formed Expedition 22 crew of the International Space Station. Soyuz TMA-17 undocked from the Zvezda module on 2 June 2010 at 0h04 UT and touched down in Kazakhstan.
     On 2 June 2010, Soyuz TMA-17 undocked from Zvezda aft port at 0h04 UT, and landed successfully in central Kazakhstan near Zhezkazgan. The descent capsule toppled on its side. The crew was in excellent condition. Following initial observation by Russian search & recovery personnel, it was flown by helicopter to Karaganda where Creamer and Noguchi boarded a NASA airplane to bring them back to Houston - the first direct return for Western crewmembers to the U.S.. Oleg Kotov meanwhile was flown to the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center at Zvesdniy Gorodok (Star City). 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 620, 629 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; RSC Energia's 21 Dec 09 ; NASA's Expedition 22 & Press Kit ; RSC Energia's 21 Dec 09, 23 Dec 09 & Expedition 21/22 ; ISS On-orbit 2 Jun 10 ;
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DirecTV 12
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2009 payload #129 ; 2009-075A ; 6,854th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: DirecTV
Launch: 29 December 2009 at 0h22 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-200/39 , by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 102.8° West longitude.
Mission: DirectTV 12 is a high-definition television broadcasting satellite to broadcast DirecTV's programming lineup for customers in the United States.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2009-0 ; 
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