Home 2008 Summary
2007 Spacecrafts 2009 Spacecrafts
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The 111 Spacecrafts Launched in 2008 :
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1) Thuraya 3 2) Polaris / TECSAR 1 3) Express-AM33 4) Progress M-63 / ISS 28P
5) STS-122 / ISS 1E 6) Columbus Science Laboratory 7) Thor 5 (Thor 2R) 8) WINDS / Kizuna
9) ATV-1 Jules Verne 10) STS-123 / ISS J/A 11) Kibo ELM-PS 12) Dextre / SPDM
13) NROL-28 (USA 200) 14) AMC-14 15) Navstar 62 (USA 201) 16) DirecTV 11
17) SAR-Lupe 4 18) Soyuz TMA-12 / ISS 16S 19) ICO G1 20) C/NOFS
21) Star One C2 22) VINASAT-1 23) Tianlian I 24) GIOVE-B
25) CARTOSAT-2A 26) IMS-1 / Indian Mini Satellite 27) NLS-5 28) RUBIN-8
29) CAN-X2 30) DELPHI-C3 31) CUTE 1.7 32) SEEDS
33) AAUSAT-II 34) COMPASS-1 35) Amos 3 36) Progress M-64 / ISS 29P
37) Galaxy 18 38) Kosmos 2437
Gonets-M 2
39) Kosmos 2438 / Gonets-M 3 40) Kosmos 2438 / Gonets-M 4
41) Yubileynyy 42) FY-3A / Feng Yun 3A 43) STS-124 / ISS-1J 44) Kibo Pressurized Module (JPM)
45) Zhongxing 9 (Chinasat 9) 46) GLAST 47) Skynet 5C 48) Turksat 3A
49) Orbcomm CDS-1 50) Orbcomm R-1 51) Orbcomm R-2 52) Orbcomm R-3
53) Orbcomm R-4 54) Orbcomm R-5 55) OSTM/Jason 2 56) Kosmos 2440
57) ProtoStar 1 58) Badr 6 59) EcoStar XI 60) SAR-Lupe 5
61) Kosmos 2441 / Persona No. 1 62) Trailblazer 63) PreSat 64) Nanosail-D
65) Celestis' Explorers Flight 66) Superbird 7 67) AMC 21 -- Iranian Test
68) Inmarsat 4 F3 69) Tachys 70) Mati 71) Choma
72) Choros 73) Trochia 74) HJ-1A / Huan Jing-1A 75) HJ-1B / Huan Jing-1B
76) GeoEye 1 77) Progress M-65 / ISS 30P 78) Nimiq 4 79) Galaxy 19
80) Kosmos 2442 / Glonass 724 81) Kosmos 2443 / Glonass 725 82) Kosmos 2444 / Glonass 726 83) Shenzhou VII
84) BX-1 85) Ratsat 86) THEOS 87) Soyuz TMA-13 / ISS 17S
88) IBEX 89) Chandraayan-1 90) MIP / Moon Impactor Probe 91) COSMO-Skymed 3 / COSMO-3
92) SJ-6A-3 / Shi Jian 6A-3 93) SJ-6B-3 / Shi Jian 6B-3 94) Venezuela 1 / Venesat 1 Simon Bolivar Satellite 95) Chuanxin-1-02
96) Shiyan Weixing 3 97) Astra 1M 98) Kosmos 2445 / Kobalt-M #4 99) STS-126 / ULF-2
100) PSSC Testbed 101) Progress M-01M / ISS 31P 102) Yayogan IV / Yaogan Weixing 4 103) Kosmos 2446 / 73D6
104) Ciel-2 105) Yaogan V 106) Hot Bird 9 107) W2M
108) FY-2E / Feng Yun 2E 109) Kosmos 2447 / Glonass-M 110) Kosmos 2448 / Glonass-M 111) Kosmos 2449 / Glonass-M
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Thuraya 3
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload # ; 2008-001A ; 6,615th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Phone)
Families: 1,051th Civilian Communications satellite ; 809th Geostationary satellite.
Ranks: 2,9287h Civilian spacecraft (16th Arabian); 16th Arabian satellite (16th Civilian).
Sponsor: Thuraya Satellite Telecommunications Company (United Arab Emirate)

Source: Boeing
Launch: 14 January 2008 at 11h49 UTC, from Odyssey Launch Platform, by a Zenit-3SL.
(The Odyssey plastorm was positioned in the Pacific Ocean along the equator at 154° West longitude.)
Orbit: Geostationary at 98.5° East longitude.
Mission: Thuraya 3 is a 5250-kg mobile communications system serves a region of 2.3 billion people.
     Boeing Satellite Systems (BSS) built the complete turnkey system under a contract signed on Sept. 11, 1997. This included the manufacture and October 2000 launch of Thuraya-1, a high-power Boeing GEM satellite, plus a second spacecraft, ground facilities and user handsets. The system began commercial operations in mid-2001. Sea Launch successfully orbited Thuraya-2 on June 10, 2003. The Thuraya company has exercised an option to order Thuraya-3 as a ground spare. The Thuraya satellites are the first spacecraft in the Boeing GEO-Mobile satellites (GEM) series which integrate a high-power geosynchronous satellite (derived from the Boeing 702 body-stabilized design) with a ground segment and user handsets, to provide a range of cellular-like voice and data services over a large geographic region. . Sea Launch successfully launched Thuraya-1, in October 2000 and Thuraya-2 in June 2003. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 590 ; Spacewarn No. 651 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's Thuraya 3 ; Boeing's Thuraya 2/3Sea Launch's ; Thuraya's : Spaceflgiht Now's 14 Jan 08 ;
The Zenit 3SL rocket launched Thuraya 3 satellite (Photos: Sea Launch)
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Polaris / TECSAR 1
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #2 ; 2008-002A ; 6,616th spacecraft.
Type: Radar Surveillance
Families: 1200th Radar Surveillance satellite.
Ranks: 3,689th Military spacecraft (8th Israelian) ; 11th Israelian satellite (8th Military).
Sponsor: Israel Defense Ministry
Launch: 21 January 2008 at 3h45 UTC, from Dhawan Space Centre SHAR's First Launch Pad, by a PSLV.
Orbit: 450 km x 580 km x 41°
Mission: TECSAR is a 300-kg Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Technology satellite built by MBT Space, a division of the Israeli Aerospace industries. The satellite is equipped with a SAR payload with the capability to see through the clouds and carry out day and night all weather imaging. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 591 ; Spacewarn No. 651 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's TECSAR 1 ; ISRO's 21 Jan 08 ; SpaceflightNow's 21 Jan 08 ; Haaretz's 22 Jan 08 : EO's TecSAR ;
The  PSLV C10 rocket launched TechSAR satellites (Photos: ISRO)
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Express-AM33
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #3 ; 2008-003A ; 6,617th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families: 1,052nd Civilian Communications satellite ; 810th Geostationary satellite.
Ranks: 2,928th Civilian spacecraft (1,053 Russian) ; 3,494th Russian spacecraft (1053rd Civilian).
Sponsor: Russian Satellite Communications Company (RSCC)
Launch: 28 January 2008 at 0h18 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-200, by a Proton M/Breeze M.
Orbit: Geostarionary at 96.5° East longitude
Mission: Express-AM33 is a 2,579-kg (dry) communications satellites that carries 10 C-band, 16 Ku-band and 1 L-band transponders to provide digital TV services, Internet access, data transmission, video conferencing as well as mobile presidential and governmental communications.  It also provide VSAT services across Russia, CIS countries, Europe, Asia and Africa. Ordered by Russian Satellites Communications Company, the satellite was manufactured by NPO PM (Krasnoyarsk) together with Thales Alenia Space (France). Express-AM33 is the sixth implementation of the Express-AM satellite platform. The distinctive feature of the new satellite is the steerable C- and Ku-band antennas enabling a most flexible respond to different customer requests.   Its orbital operational life is 12 years
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 591 ; Spacewarn No. 651 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; SpaceflightNow's 28 Jan 08 ; RSCC's 28 Jan 08
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Progress M-63 / ISS 28P
Spacecraft:  Progress M (7K-TGM) No. 363
Chronologies: 2008 payload #4 ; 2008-004A ; 6,618th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families: 476th Piloted Spaceship (289th Russian) ; 118th Progress cargoship ;
69th ISS Operation (46th Russian).
Ranks: 2,929th Civilian spacecraft (1,054 Russian) ; 3,495th Russian spacecraft (1054th Civilian).
Sponsor: Russian Federal Space Agency
Progress M-63 in preparation. (Photos: RSC Eneregia)


Progress M-63 arrival at ISS, on 7 February 2008 (Photos: NASA)
Launch: 5 February 2008 at 13h03 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz U.
Orbit: Initial: 191.2 km x 263.6 km x 51.63° x 88.77 min.
332.0 km x 354.8 km x 51,6° x 91.1 min.
Deorbit: 7 April 2008 over the Pacific Ocean.
Mission: Progress M-63 is a cargo transport craft that deliver to the International Space Sration more than 2.5 tons of various cargoes that are needed to support the operation of ISS,  This cargo comprize supplies of oxygen, water and food, propellants, consumables, scientific instrumentation and equipment. Intended for the US segment are 395 kg of cargo  Progress M-63 is the 28th Russian logistics spacecraft (ISS-28P) launched toward ISS. Proximity operations, fly-around maneuver and docking were performed in automatic mode. Initial contact with the docking port of the Pirs docking module/compartment occurred at 1438 UTC. 
     Progress M-63 successfully undocked from the ISS on 7 April 2008 at 4h49 EDT.  All separation burns went off nominally, and the deorbit burn followed at 7h50 for destructive reentry over the Pacific Ocean. (For the first time in many years, there is no Progress docked at ISS. The next Progress arrival is schedule for mid-May.)
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 591 ; Spacewarn No. 652 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; RSC Energia's 5 Feb 08 & 7 Fév 08 ;
Launch of Progress M-63 by a Soyuz U. (Photos: RSC Energia)
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STS-122 / ISS 1E
Spacecraft: Space Shuttle's 121st flight, Atlantis' 29th flight and 24th Shuttle flight to ISS.
Chronologies: 2008 payload #5 ; 2008-005A ; 6,619th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families: 266th Human Spaceflight (153rd American) ; 477th Piloted Spaceship (182nd American) ; 70th ISS Operation (24th American).
Ranks: 2,930th Civilian spacecraft (1769th American) ; 1,769th American spacecraft (626th Civilian).
Sponsor: NASA

Source: NASA
Launch: 7 February 2008 at 19h45 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle
Orbit:
Mission: STS-122 is a piloted mission which carry a crew of seven astronauts to deliver the Columbus science laboratory, Europe’s primary contribution to ISS, to the International Space Station. Aboard Atlantis are Commander Steve Frick, Pilot Alan Poindexter and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Rex Walheim, Stanley Love, Hans Schlegel and Leopold Eyharts. Following Atlantis arrival at ISS, Eyharts becomes a member of the Expedition 16 crew, joining Commander Peggy Whitson and Flight Engineer Yuri Malenchenko, as Dan Tani, who has been aboard the station since October 2007, return to Earth on Atlantis.
     Following a flawless rendezvous, Atlantis docked onto the PMA-2 on 9 February à 12h15 EST. Hatchs opening was at 13h40.  NASA then announced that it will delayed the first spacewalk and installation of Columbus on ISS by one day, because of a ˜crew medical issue˜ affecting Schlegel. Schlegel, who was scheduled to make the first EVA with Walheim, will be replace Love.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 591 ; Spacewarn No. 652 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; NASA's STS-122 & STS-122 Press Kit ;
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The International Space Station at the end of the STS-122 mission (S122-E-009856, S122-E-009880 & S122-E-011112)
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Columbus Science Laboratory
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #6 ; 2008 n/a ; 6,620th spacecraft.
Type: Science Laboratory / Space Station Component
Families: 478th Piloted Spaceship (1st European).
Ranks: 2,931st Civilian spacecraft (255th European) ; 291st European spacecraft (255th Civilian).
Sponsor: ESA

Source: NASA
Artist concepts of ISS with the Columbus Laboratory (Sources: NASA & ESA)
Launch: 7 February 2007 at 19h45 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle
Columbus was officially attached to ISS on 11 February 2008 at 16h44 EST.
Orbit: Part of the International Space Station.
Mission: Columbus is a 12,775-kg research laboratory which is permanantly attached to the International Space Station to provides internal payload accommodation for experiments in the field of multidisciplinary research into material science, fluid physics and life science. In addition, an external payload facility hosts experiments and applications in the field of space science, Earth observation and technology.  Attached to ISS Node 2 Harmony starboard docking port, Columbus is equipped with flexible reseach facilities that offer extensive science capabilities. It is ESA's biggest single contribution to the International Space Station. 
     During its 10-year projected lifespan, the 4.5-metre diameter, with 75 cubic metres of space inside,  cylindrical laboratory will be able to conduct thousands of experiments all in the weightlessness of orbit. The Columbus laboratory has room for ten International Standard Payload Racks (ISPRs), eight situated in the sidewalls, and two in the ceiling area. Each rack is the size of a telephone booth and able to host its own autonomous and independent laboratory, complete with power and cooling systems and video and data links back to researchers on Earth.  Outside its comfortable, pressurized hull, Columbus has four mounting points for external payloads. Exposed to the vacuum of space, and with an unhindered view of the Earth and outer space, science packages can investigate anything from the ability of bacteria to survive on an artificial meteorite to volcanic activity 400 km below on the Earth. 
     Columbus dimensions: total module length: 6,87 metre, largest diameter: 4.48 metre, and total internal volume: 75 cubic-meter. Columbus launch mass was 12,775 kg (with 2,500 kg of payload), its mass without payload being 10,275 kg.  Maximum on orbit mass is 21,000 kg (with a maximum payload mass of 9,000 kg).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 591 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; ESA's Columbus & Overview ; STS-122 Press Kit
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Thor 5 (Thor 2R)
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies:  2008 payload #7 ; 2008-06A ; 6,621st spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families: 1,053rd Civilian Communications satellite ; 811th Geostationary satellite.
Ranks: 2,932nd Civilian spacecraft (540th Commercial) ; 540th Commercial spacecraft (540th Civilian).
Sponsor: Norway's Telenor Satellite Broadcasting 

Source: OSC
Launch: 11 February 2008 at 11h34 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-200/39, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 0.8° West longitude
Mission: THOR 5 is a communications satellite that delivers broadcast and interactive services across the Nordic region, Europe and the Middle East for Telenor Satellite Broadcasting of Norway. THOR 5 is a STAR 2 model spacecraft built by Orbital Sciences Corp. of Dulles, Va.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 591 ; Spacewarn No. 652 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's ; ILS's Blog, 11 Feb 08 ; Telenor's 11 Feb 08 ; OSC's 11 Feb 08 ; SpaceflightNow's 12 Feb 08 ;
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WINDS / Kizuna
Spacecraft:  Wideband Inter-Networking engineering test and Demonstration Satellite
Chronologies: 2008 payload #8 ; 2008-07A ; 6,622nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families: 1,054dh Civilian Communications satellite ; 812th Geostationary satellite.
Ranks: 2,933rd Civilian spacecraft (111th Japanese) ; 118th Japanese spacecraft (111th civilian).
Sponsor: Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

Source: JAXA
Launch: 23 February 2008 at 8h55 UTC, from Tanegashima Space Center, by H-IIA.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 592 ; Spacewarn No. 652 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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ATV-1 Jules Verne
Spacecraft:  ATV stands for Automated Transfer Vehicle
Chronologies: 2008 payload #9 ; 2008-08A ; 6,623rd spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station (1st European cargo)
Families: 479th Piloted Spaceship (2nd European) ;1st European cargoship ; 71st ISS Operation (1st European).
Ranks: 2,934th Civilian spacecraft (256th European) ; 292nd European spacecraft (256th Civilian).
Sponsor: European Space Agency

Source: ESA
Source: NASA.
ISS016-E-034177  ISS016-E-033718 ISS016-E-034191 ISS016-E-034176
Launch: 9 March 2008 at 4h03 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ES.
Orbit: At ISS docking (3 Apr 08) : 338.4 km x 339.7 km x 51.64° x 91.32 min.
Mission: ATV-1, nicknamed Jules Verne, is the first European cargo transport ship that delivers 8 tons of supplies to the Internation Space Station. It had a total mass of 20,750 kg at liftoff and carries 5,752 kg of maneuver propellant, 860 kg ISS refuel propellant, 20 kg oxygen gas, 280 kg water and 1,150 kg varied dry cargo.  After a four-week orbital test flight, the craft docked successfully at the Service Module aft port on 3 April 2008 at 10h45 EDT.  The cargo transport, which remains docked for the next four months, is delivering 1,150 kg of dry cargo, including food, clothes and equipment as well as two original manuscripts handwritten by Jules Verne and a 19th Century illustrated edition of his novel “From the Earth to the Moon”.  The cargo also includes 856 kg of propellant, 270 kg of drinking water and 21 kg of oxygen, to be transferred to the Station.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 592 ; Spacewarn No. 653 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; Arianespace's 9 Mar 08 ; ESA's 9 Mar 08 ; SpaceflightNow's 9 Mar 08 ;
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STS-123 / ISS J/A
Spacecraft:  Space Shuttle's 122nd flight, Endeavour's 21st flightand 25th Shuttle flight to ISS.
Chronologies: 2008 payload #10 ; 2008-09A ; 6,624th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families: 267th Human Spaceflight (154th American) ; 480th Piloted Spaceship (183rd American) ; 72nd ISS Operation (25th American).
Ranks: 2,935th Civilian spacecraft (1770th American) ; 1,770th American spacecraft (627th civilian).
Sponsor: NASA

Source: NASA
Launch: 11 March 2008 at 6h28 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit: At ISS docking: 340.4 km x 342.0 km x 51.64°x 91.36 min.
Lander: 26 March 2008 at 20h39 EDT, at the Kennedy Space Center.
Mission: STS-123 / ISS-1J/A is carrying the 8,387-kg Japanese Experiment Logistics Module-Pressurized Section (ELM-PS or JLP) and the 1,542-kg Canadian Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) “Dextre”.  Onboard Endeavour is a seven-member crew of Commander Dominic Gorie, Pilot Gregory Johnson and Mission Specialists Richard Linnehan, Robert Behnken, Michael Foreman, Takao Doi and Garrett Reisman.  Reisman replaces Léopold Eyharts as ISS Expedition 16 Flight Engineer 2. 
     Endeavour docked to the PMA-2 of ISS on 12 March at 23h49 EDT. The crew perform five EVA to install the JLP and Dextre. EVA-1 was completed on 14 March by Linnehan and Reisman in 7 hr. and 1 min.  Japan’s JLP module was successfully installed on the Node-2 “Harmony” on 14 March at ~3:00 EDT. (It added approximately 55 cubic-metres of internal volume to ISS.) EVA-2 was completed on 16 March by Linnehan and Foreman in 7 hr. and 8 min. EVA-3 was completed on 18 March by Linnehan and Behnken in 6 hr. and 53 min. On 19 March, Dextre was moved on the U.S. Lab grapple fixture. EVA-4 was completed on 21 March by Behnken and Foreman in 6 hr. and 24 min.(to demonstrated an on-orbit heat shield repair technique). EVA-5 was completed on 21 March by Behnken and Foreman in 6 hr. and 24 min. 
     Endeavour undocked on 24 March at 20h25 EDT, 29 minutes late following difficulty in feathering ITS-P6 solar arrays. On 26 March, it returned to Earth after 15 d. 18 hr. 11 min. in space, the longest Shuttle mission to ISS so far. The Orbiter touched down at KSC on the second opportunity at 20h39 EDT. It was the 122nd Space Shuttle flight, the 21st flight for Endeavour and the 25th flight to the station. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 593 ; Spacewarn No. 653 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; NASA' s STS-123 & STS-123 Pres Kit ;
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The International Space Station at the end of STS-123 mission (S123-E-009345 & S123-E-010172)
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Kibo ELM-PS
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #11 ; 2008 n/a ; 6,625th spacecraft.
Type: Space Station Module
Families: 481st Piloted Spaceship (1st Japanese).
Ranks: 2,936th Civilian spacecraft (112th Japanese) ; 119th Japanese spacecraft (111th civilian).
Sponsor: Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

Source: NASA
Launch: 11 March 2008 at 6h28 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
The ELM-PS was installed on Node-2/Harmony on 14 March 2008 at ~3h00 EDT.
Orbit: Part of the International Space Station.
Mission: The Japanese Experiment Logistics Module-Pressurized Section (ELM-PS or JLP) is the first of the three components of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Kibo. The 8,387-kg module is Kibo’s storage facility that provides stowage space for experiment payloads, samples and spare items. On the space station, Kibo is the only experiment facility with its own dedicated storage facility. The ELM-PS is a cylinder measuring 4.4 meters in diameter and 4.2 meters in length.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 593 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; STS-123 Pres Kit
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Dextre / SPDM
Spacecraft:  SPDM stands for Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #12 ; 2008 n/a ; 6,626th spacecraft.
Type: Space Station Component
Families:
Ranks: 2,937th Civilian spacecraft (30th Canadian) ; 30th Canadian spacecraft (30th Civilian).
Sponsor: Canadian Space Agency (CSA)

Source: NASA
S123-E-007107 S123-E-009714 S123-E-007101 S123-E-007088
Dextre in space (upper) and desing concepts (below)
Launch: 11 March 2008 at 6h28 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Dextre was stowed on the U.S. Lab grapple fixture on 19 March 2008.
Orbit: Part of the International Space Station.
Mission: Dextre, the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, is a 1,560-kg agile robot that services outside the International Space Station. It can pivot at the waist, and its shoulders support two identical arms with seven joints that allow great degree of movement. The robot is equipped with lights, video equipment, a stowage platform and four robotic tools. At the end of each arm is an Orbital Replacement Unit/tool changeout Mechanism that can hold a payload or tool with a vice-like grip. Dextre can accomplish tasks that require high precision (it has a 2 milimetres positioning accuracy) and a gentle touch (2.2 newtons) such as removing and replacing station components, opening and closing covers and deploying or retracting mechanisms. For several reasons, it is designed to move only one arm at a time: to maintain stability, to harmonize activities with Canadarm on the Shuttle and Canadarm2 on the Space Station, and to minimize the possibility of self-collision.
     Dextre is the third and final component of the Mobile Servicing System developed by Canada as its contribution to the ISS program. The first element is Canadarm2 installed in 2001 and the second is the Mobile Base System added in 2002. Dextre can either be attached to the end of Canadarm2 or ride independently on the Mobile Base System. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; STS-123 Pres Kit ; CSA's Dextre ;
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NROL-28 (USA 200)
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #13 ; 2008-010A ; 6,627th spacecraft.
Type: Electronic Intelligence (and also Missile Early Warning)
Families: 279th Electronic Intelligence
Ranks: 3,690th Military spacecraft (1144th American) ; 1,771st American spacecraft (1144th Military).
Sponsor: U.S. National Reconnaissance Office
Launch: 13 March 2008 at 10h02 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-3E, by an Atlas 5.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 593 ; Spacewarn No. 653 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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AMC 14
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #14 ; 2008-011A (failure); 6,628th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families: 1,055th Civilian Communications satellite ;
Ranks: 2,938th Civilian spacecraft (541stt Commercial); 541st Commercial satellite (541st Civilian).
Sponsor: SES AMERICOM
Launch: 14 March 2008 at 23h19 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a Proton / Breeze M.
Orbit: Failed to reach geostatonary orbit.
Mission: AMC-14 is a communications satellite with 32 Ku-band transponders that was scheduled to provide direct-to-home broadcast services across the continental U.S., Mexico and Central America for EchoStar Communications Corp., which has leased the entire capacity of the satellites for its expected 15 years of service. But the satellite failed to reach its planned geostationary orbit following the Breeze M upper stage engine that shut down two minutes and 13 seconds earlier than planned. 
     Based on Lockheed Martin’s A2100AX platform, AMC-14 is the 36th A2100 spacecraft designed and built by Lockheed Martin for customers worldwide and the 17th for SES companies.  The craft also carries a demonstration receive active phased array payload that allows coverage to be reshaped on orbit.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 593 ; Spacewarn No. 653 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; LMA's 12 Mar 08 ; Spaceflight Now's 15 Mar 08
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Navstar 62 (USA 201)
Spacecraft:  Navstar SVN 48, Block IIR-M6, GPS IIR-19 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #15 ; 2008-012A ; 6,629th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families: 374th Navigation satellite ; 62nd Navstar U.S. navsat.
Ranks: 3,691st Military spacecraft (1145th American) ; 1,772nd American spacecraft (1145th Military).
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense

Source: Lockheed-Martin
Launch: 15 March 2008 at 6h10 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-17A, by Delta II.
Orbit:
Mission: Navstar 62, or GPS IIR-19M, is a 2,032-kg (1,070-kg in orbit) navigation satellite designed to provide enhanced navigation capabilities for military and civilian GPS users around the globe. It is the sixth in a line of eight GPS IIR satellites that Lockheed Martin Navigation Systems has modernized for the Global Positioning Systems Wing, Space and Missile Systems Center, Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif.  (Lockheed Martin had built 21 GPS IIR spacecraft and subsequently modernized eight of those spacecraft designated Block IIR-M.)  The satellite includes a modernized antenna panel that provides increased signal power to receivers on the ground, two new military signals for improved accuracy, enhanced encryption and anti-jamming capabilities for the military, and a second civil signal that will provide users with an open access signal on a different frequency. The GPS constellation provides critical situational awareness and precision weapon guidance for the military and supports a wide range of civil, scientific and commercial functions – from air traffic control to the Internet – with precision location and timing information.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 594 ; Spacewarn No. 653 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; LMI's GPS-IIR, 13 Mar 08 & 15 Mar 08 ; Spaceflgiht Now' s 15 Mar 08
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DirecTV 11
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #16 ; 2008-013A ; 6,630th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Direct-to-Home)
Families: 1,056th Civilian Communications satellite ; 813th Geostationary satellite.
Ranks: 2,939th Civilian spacecraft (542nd Commercial) ; 542nd Commercial satellite (542nd Civilian).
Sponsor: DirecTV
Launch: 19 March 2008 at 22h48 UTC, from the Odyssey launch platform, by a Zenit 3SL.
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 594 ; Spacewarn No. 653 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; Spaceflight Now's 19 Mar 08 ; DirecTV's 19 Mar 08 & 20 Mar 08 ; SeaLaunch's 19 Mar 08 ; Boeing's 20 Mar 08 ;
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SAR-Lupe 4
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #17 ; 2008-014A ; 6,631st spacecraft.
Type: Radar Surveaillance
Families: 1,201st Surveillance satellite
Ranks: 3,692nd Military spacecraft (37th European) ; 296th European spacecraft (37th Military).
Sponsor: German Ministry of Defense and the Federal Office of Defense Technology and Procurement
Launch: 27 March 2008 at 17h15 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-132/1, by a Kosmos-3M.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 594 ; Spacewarn No. 653 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Soyuz TMA-12 / ISS 16S
Spacecraft:  Soyuz 11F732 (7K-STMA) No. 222
Chronologies: 2008 payload #18 ; 2008-015A ; 6,632nd spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families: 268th Human Spaceflight (107th Soviet) ; 482nd Piloted Spaceship (290th Russian) ; 79th ISS Operation (47th Russian).
Ranks: 2,940th Civilian spacecraft (1055th Russian) ; 3,496th Russian spacecraft (1055th Civilian).
Sponsor: Russian Space Agency

Source: NASA
Launch: 8 April 2008 at 11h16 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz-FG.
Orbit: Initial: 189.6 km x 230.1 km x 56°
At ISS docking: 337.3 km x 338.7 km x 51.64° x 91.29 min.
Mission: Soyuz TMA-12 is a crew transport craft that carries Expedition 17 crew of Commander Sergey Volkov and Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko, as well as the 14th Visiting Crewmember, Yi Soyeon, of South Korea, to the International Space Station. The craft docked on the Docking Compartment port on 10 April 2008 at 8h57 EDT.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 595 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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ICO G1
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #19 ; 2008-016A ; 6,633rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Mobile)
Families: 1,057th Civilian Communications satellite ; 814th Geostationary satellite.
Ranks: 2,941st Civilian spacecraft (543rd Commercial) ; 543rd Commercial satellite (543rd Civilian).
Sponsor: ICO Global Communications

Source: ICO
Launch: 14 April 2008 at 20h12 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-41, by an Atlas V.
Orbit: Geostationary at 92.85° West longitude.
Mission: ICO G1 is a 6,634-kg communications satellites specially designed to deliver services to mobile users - interactive mobile video, navigation and emergency assistance service - to the entire United States. It is the biggest commercial satellite launched to date, measuring more than 8 metres tall and spanning more than 30 metres with its solar arrays and with an umbrella–like 12 meter reflector. Constructed by Space Systems/Loral using the Loral 1300 platform, ICO G1 is the first commercial satellite to utilize a ground-based beam forming system, which allows for unprecedented flexibility. ICO G1 is thus an innovative next-generation satellite with a planned mission life of 15 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 595 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; ICO 14 Apr 08 ; SS/Loras's 28 Apr 08 ;
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C/NOFS / STP P00-3
Spacecraft:  C/NOFS stands for Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System
Chronologies: 2008 payload #20 ; 2008-017A ; 6,634th spacecraft.
Type: Science & Technology
Families:
Ranks: 3,693rd Military spacecraft (1146th American) ; 1,773rd American spacecraft (1146th military).
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense

Source: KAF
Launch: 16 April 2008 at 16h52 UTC, from Kwajalein atoll, by a Pegasus XL.
(The L-1011 took off from the U.S. Army’s Reagan Test Site in the Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands.)
Orbit: 400 km x 850 km x 13°
Mission: C/NOFS, DoD Space Test Program's P00-3, is a ~395 kg space weather forecasting satellite, the first-ever satellite which observed the potential degradation of space communication, navigation and surveillance systems due to ionospheric scintillations. Satellites communication and navigation systems used by the Air Force and other DOD agencies are susceptible to outages due to ionospheric disturbances (scintillations) in the Earth’s equatorial region. C/NOFS is designed to help predict these scintillations and to forecast outages in satellite communication links. Built by General Dynamics, it is a joint project of the U.S. Air Force’s Space and Missile Center’s Space Development and Test Wing and the Air Force Research Laboratory Space Vehicles Directorate.
     The Pegasus XL rocket was released from the L-1011 carrier aircraft at approximately 13h00 EDT. The satellite was accurately deployed into its targeted elliptical orbit after an 8-minute powered flight sequence. The mission was the 25th consecutive successful mission for the Pegasus program since 1997 and the 39th overall flight since its introduction in 1990.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 595 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; General Dynamics's 16 Apr 08 ; OSC's 16 Apr 08 ; KAT's Doc
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Star One C2
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #21 ; 2008-018A ; 6,635th spacecraft.
Type: Communications ;
Families: 1,058th Civilian Communications satellite ; 815th Geostationary satellite.
Ranks: 2,942nd Civilian spacecraft (15th Brazilian) ; 15th Brazilian satellite (15th Civilian).
Sponsor: Brazil's Star One
Launch: 18 April 2008 at 22h17 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 70° West longitude.
Mission: Star One C2 is a 4,100-kg (1,750 kg dry mass) communications satellite fitted with 28 C-band, 16 Ku-band and one X-band transponders to provide communications, multimedia and broadband Internet services for South America.  Measuring 4.0 x 3.2 x 2.4 metres (with a wingspan of 22.4 metres), the craft had a 15-year lifespan. Built by Thales Alenia Space using a Spacebus 3000 B3 platform, the satellite was part of a turnkey contract for Brazilian operator Star One, the largest regional satellite service operator in Latin America. It is the eighth Brazilian satellite launched by an Ariane.  This 182nd Ariane launch (right), the 38th Ariane 5 launch. carries a total payload of 7,762 kg, including 6,737 kg for two satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 595 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; Arianespace's 19 Apr 08 & Press Kit ;
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VINASAT-1
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #22 ; 2008-018B ; 6,636th spacecraft.
Type: Communication
Families: 1,059th Civilian Communications satellite ; 816th Geostationary satellite.
Ranks: 2,943rd Civilian spacecraft (1st Vietnamese) ; 1st Vietnamese satellite (1st Civilian).
Sponsor: Vietnam Posts and Telecommunications Group
Launch: 18 April 2008 at 22h17 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 132° East longitude.
Mission: VINASAT-1 is a 2,637-kg communications satellite carrying 12 Ku-band and 8 C-band transponders. As Vietnam’s first communications satellite, it provides radio, television and telephone transmission services throughout the country. Built by Lockheed Martin Commercial Space Systems, using an A2100A platform, it measures 3.8 x 1.9 x 1.9 metres (with an orbital wingspan of 14.65 metres) with a design life exceeding 15 years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 595 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; Arianespace's 19 Apr 08  & Press Kit ;
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Tianlian I
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #23 ; 2008-019A ; 6,637th spacecraft.
Type: Communication (data relay)
Families: 1,060th Civilian Communications satellite ; 817th Geostationary satellite.
Ranks: 2,944th Civilian spacecraft (59th Chinese) ; 113th Chinese spacecraft (59th Civilian).
Sponsor: China
Launch:  25 April 2008 at 22h16 UTC, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3C.
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: Tianlian I is China first data-relay satellite. It will be used to increase communication time with the Shenzhou VII spaceship to be launched in the second half of 2008.  The craft was developed by the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation. According to China report, the launch is the 105th mission of China's Long March series of rockets, but the first mission of the Long March-3C carrier rocket. (China had planned 10 space launches this year.) 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 595 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; China Daily, 26 Apr 08 ; People's Daily's 26 Apr 08 ;
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GIOVE-B
Spacecraft:  GIOVE stands for Galileo In-Orbit Validation Element
Chronologies: 2008 payload #24 ; 2008-020A ; 6,638th spacecraft.
Type: Technology (Navigation)
Families:
Ranks: 2,945th Civilian spacecraft (257th European) ; 293rd European spacecraft (257th Civilian).
Sponsor: European Space Agency, the European Commission and Eurocontrol.
Launch: 26 April 2008 at 22h16 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a Soyuz FG/Fregat.
Orbit: Circular at about 23,200 km x 56°.
Mission: GIOVE-B is a 500-kg navigation demonstration satellite for the Galileo system. It continue GIOVE-A demonstration of critical technologies.  Like its predecessor, it carries two redundant rubidium atomic clocks, each with a stability of 10 nanoseconds per day. It also features an even more accurate payload: the Passive Hydrogen Maser (PHM), with stability better than 1 nanosecond per day. The first of its kind into space, this is now the most stable clock operating in Earth orbit. Two PHMs will be used as primary clocks onboard operational Galileo satellites, with two rubidium clocks serving as back-up. GIOVE-B also incorporates a radiation-monitoring payload to characterise the space environment at the altitude of the Galileo constellation, as well as a laser retroreflector for high-accuracy laser ranging.  The satellite was built by a team led by Astrium GmbH, with Thales Alenia Space. The next step in the Galileo programme will be the launch of four operational satellites to validate the basic Galileo space and related ground segment by 2010.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; ESA's GIOVE-B, 26 Apr 08 & 27 Apr 08 ;

 

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CARTOSAT-2A
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #25 ; 2008-021A ; 6,639th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remoste Sensing
Families: 119th Earth Remoste Sensing.(17th Indian).
Ranks: 2,946th Civilian spacecraft (49th Indian) ; 49th Indian spacecraft (49th Civilian).
Sponsor: Indian Space Research Organisation

Source: ISRO
Spacecrafts launched by the PSLV-C9 (Source: ISRO)
Launch: 28 April 2008 at 3h53:51 UTC, from Sriharikota's Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV.
Orbit:
Mission: CARTOSAT-2A is a 650-kg Earth-remote sensing satellite with a spatial resolution of about one metre and swath of 9.6 km. The satellite carries a panchromatic camera capable of taking black-and-white pictures in the visible region of electromagnetic spectrum. The craft is steerable along as well as across the direction of its movement to facilitate imaging of any area more frequently. High-resolution data from CARTOSAT-2A will be used for large-scale mapping of urban and rural development. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; ISRO's 28 Apr 08 & CARTOSAT-2A ; SpaceflightNow's 28 Apr 08 ;
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IMS-1 / Indian Mini Satellite
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #26 ; 2008-021B ; 6,640th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families: 120th Earth Remoste Sensing.(18th Indian).
Ranks: 2,947th Civilian spacecraft (50th Indian) ; 50th Indian spacecraft (50th Civilian).
Sponsor: Indian Space Research Organisation
Launch: 28 April 2008 at 3h53:51 UTC, from Sriharikota's Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV.
Orbit:
Mission: IMS-1 is a 83-kg satellite which incorporates many new technologies for remote sensing applications and has miniaturised subsystems. It carries two remote sensing payloads: a Multi-spectral camera and a Hyper-spectral camera, operating in the visible and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The spatial resolution of the first camera is 37 metre with a swath of 151 km, while that of the second camera is about 506 metre with a swath of about 130 km. The data from this mission will be made available to interested space agencies and student community from developing countries to provide necessary impetus to capacity building in using satellite data. The versatile IMS-1 has been specifically developed to carry different payloads in future without significant changes in it and has a design life time of two years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; ISRO's 28 Apr 08 & IMS-1 ;
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NLS-5
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #27 ; 2008-021 ; 6,641st spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families: 111th Ameteur/Student Satellite ;
Ranks: 2,948th Civilian spacecraft (93rd Amateur) ; 93rd Amateur spacecraft (Canadian).
Sponsor: University of Toronto's Spaceflight Laboratory, Canada
Launch: 28 April 2008 at 3h53:51 UTC, from Sriharikota's Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV.
Orbit:
Mission: NLS-5 is a 16.0-kg nanosatellite which perform survey of the maritime VHF band.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; ISRO's 28 Apr 08 & Nanosatellites ;
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RUBIN-8
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #28 ; 2008-021 ; 6,642nd spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families: 112th Ameteur/Student Satellite ;
Ranks: 2,949th Civilian spacecraft (258th European) ; 295th European (258th Civilian).
Sponsor: COSMOS International, Germany
Launch: 28 April 2008 at 3h53:51 UTC, from Sriharikota's Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV.
Orbit:
Mission: RUBIN-8 is a 8.0-kg nanosatellite for testing of new space-based receiver and data upload system for Automatic Maritime Identification System  (AIS). 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; ISRO's 28 Apr 08 & Nanosatellites ;
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CAN-X2
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #29 ; 2008-021 ; 6,643rd spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families: 113th Ameteur/Student Satellite ;
Ranks: 2,950th Civilian spacecraft (94th Amateur) ; 94th Amateur spacecraft (Canadian).
Sponsor: University of Toronto's Spaceflight Laboratory, Canada

Source: U. of Toronto
Launch: 28 April 2008 at 3h53:51 UTC, from Sriharikota's Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV.
Orbit:
Mission: CAN-X2 is a 7.0-kg nanosatellite for flight-testing of nano cold-gas propultion system, innovative attitude sensors and commercial GPS receivers.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; ISRO's 28 Apr 08 & Nanosatellites ; UT SL's CanX-2 ;
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DELPHI-C3
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #30 ; 2008-021 ; 6,644th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families: 114th Ameteur/Student Satellite ;
Ranks: 2,951st Civilian spacecraft (95th Amateur) ; 95th Amateur spacecraft.
Sponsor: Delfi's Technical University, Netherlands
Launch: 28 April 2008 at 3h53:51 UTC, from Sriharikota's Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV.
Orbit:
Mission: DELPHI-C3 is a 6.5-kg nanosatellite for flight-testing of thin film solar cells, wireless Sun sensor and advenced trasnceiver.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; ISRO's 28 Apr 08 & Nanosatellites ; Delphi-C3 ;
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CUTE 1.7
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #31 ; 2008-021 ; 6,645th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families: 115th Ameteur/Student Satellite ;
Ranks: 2,952nd Civilian spacecraft (96th Amateur) ; 96th Amateur spacecraft 
Sponsor: Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan
Launch: 28 April 2008 at 3h53:51 UTC, from Sriharikota's Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV.
Orbit:
Mission: CUTE 1,7 is a 5.0-kg nanosatellite for demonstration of personnal digital assistant-based bus system and advanced photo-diode. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; ISRO's 28 Apr 08 & Nanosatellites ;
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SEEDS
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #32 ; 2008-021 ; 6,646th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families: 116th Ameteur/Student Satellite ;
Ranks: 2,953rd Civilian spacecraft (97th Amateur) ; 97th Amateur spacecraft
Sponsor: Nihon University, Japan
Launch: 28 April 2008 at 3h53:51 UTC, from Sriharikota's Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV.
Orbit:
Mission: SEEDS is a 3.0-kg nanosatellite for demonstration of receiving spacecraft parameter data.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; ISRO's 28 Apr 08 & Nanosatellites ;
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AAUSAT-II
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #33 ; 2008-021 ; 6,647th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families: 117th Ameteur/Student Satellite ;
Ranks: 2,954th Civilian spacecraft (98th Amateur) ; 98th Amateur spacecraft
Sponsor: Aalborg University, Denmark
Launch: 28 April 2008 at 3h53:51 UTC, from Sriharikota's Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV.
Orbit:
Mission: AAUSAT-II is a 3.0-kg nanosatellite for Gammy-ray burst detection and flight-testing of nano-actuators and sensors for spaceracft's 3-axis stabilization.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; ISRO's 28 Apr 08 & Nanosatellites ;
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COMPASS-1
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #34 ; 2008-021 ; 6,648th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/Student (Technology)
Families: 118th Ameteur/Student Satellite ;
Ranks: 2,955th Civilian spacecraft (99th Amateur) ; 99th Amateur spacecraft
Sponsor: Aachen's University of Applied Science, Germany 
Launch: 28 April 2008 at 3h53:51 UTC, from Sriharikota's Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, by a PSLV.
Orbit:
Mission: COMPASS-1 is a 3.0-kg nanosatellite for flight-testing of miniaturized spacecraft bus.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; ISRO's 28 Apr 08 & Nanosatellites ;
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Amos 3
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #35 ; 2008-022A ; 6,649th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families: 1,061th Civilian Communications satellite ; 818th Geostationary Satellite.
Ranks: 2,956th Civilian Spacecraft (4th Israelian) ; 12th Israelian Satellite (4th Civilian).
Sponsor: Israel's Space Communications (Spacecom) Company
Launch: 28 April 2008 at 5h00 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-45, by a Zenit 3SLB.
Orbit: Geostationary at 4° West longitude.
Mission: Amos 3 is a 1,270-kg communications satellite that carries 12 Ku-band and 2 Ka-band transponders to service Europe, Middle-East and North America.  It replaces Amos 1 with an expected service life of over 18 years, following the technical/financial success of the two previous Amos.  (On 16 May 2008, Amos 1 celebrate its 12 years of operation in orbit, while being planned for less than 11 years.)  For ensuring the continuity of services, Amos 3 is placed at the same location. It is the first Western satellite to be placed directly into geostationary orbit, using the Zenit/Block-DM, which unable to launch a satellite lighter than its predecessor and having 6 years longer service life (about 18 years). Other advantages inclues: less fuel (420 kg versus 760 kg), more communication payload (250 kg versus 160 kg), more channels, more frequencies and more income for more service years. The craft was built by Israel Aerospace Industries for Space Communications Company,
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 654 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; SpaceflightNow's 28 Apr 08 ; Sea Launch's 28 Apr 08 ; IAI's 28 Apr 08 & Amos 3 Press Kit ; RST Energia's 28 Apr 08 ;
Launch of the Zenit 3SLB with Amos 3 satellite (Source: RSC Energia)
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Progress M-64 / ISS 29P
Spacecraft:  Progress M (7K-TGM) No. 364
Chronologies: 2008 payload #36 ; 2008-023A ; 6,650th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families: 483rd Piloted Spaceship (291st Russian) ; 119th Progress Cargoship ; 74th ISS Operation (48th Russian)..
Ranks: 2,957th Civilian Spacecraft (1056th Russan) ; 3,497th Russian Spacecraft (1056th Civilian).
Sponsor: Russian Federal Space Agency
Progress M-63 in preparation. (Photos: RSC Eneregia)


Launch: 14 May 2008 at 20h22 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz U.
Orbit: Initial: 193.9 km x 245.9 km x 51.65° x 88.57 min.
At docking: 338.0 km x 356.1 km x 51.6° x  91.28 min.
Deorbit:
Mission: Progress M-64 is a cargo transport ship that deliver more than 2.3 tons of various cargo items - oxygen, water and food supplies, propellant, consumables, etc. - to the International Space Sration. It also carries Sokol KV-2 spacesuit and equipment to be installed in Zvezda module to support a new Russian research module. Following a two-day free-flight, it docked  in the automatic mode on port of the FGB Zarya  Progress M-64 is the 29th Russian cargo vehicle launched toward ISS and the 118th Progress ever launched. (Photo at right, ISS as viewed by the approching Progress M-64.)
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 655 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; RSC Energia's 15 May 08 & 17 May 08 ;

Launch of Progress M-64 by a Soyuz U. (Photos: RSC Energia)
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Galaxy 18
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #37 ; 2008-024A ; 6,651st spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families: 1,062nd Civilian Communications satellite ; 819th Geostationary Satellite.
Ranks: 2,958th Civilian Spacecraft (544th Commercial) ; 544th Commercial satellite (544th Civilian).
Sponsor: Intelsat

Source: SS/Loral
Launch: 21 May 2008 at 9h43 UTC, from Odysseay Launch Platform, by a Zenit-3SL.
Orbit: Geostationary at 123° West longitude.
Mission: Galaxy 18 is a 4,650-kg communications satellites with a hybrid payload of 24 high-power Ku-band and 24 C-band used for Fixed Satellite Services for advanced cable television, data and telecommunications services throughout North America, Alaska, Hawaii, Mexico and Puerto Rico.. It joins Intelsat's coveted North American cable community within its Galaxy fleet comprised of 16 other satellites that cover North America, Central America and the Caribbean. Built by Space Systems/Loral, the spacecraft has a planned mission life of 15 years, and is designed based on SS/L’s 1300 platform. Galaxy 18 is the 42nd Space Systems/Loral satellite built for Intelsat.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 655 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Intelsat's 21 May 08 ; Loral's 21 May 08SkyRocket's  ;
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Kosmos 2437
Spacecraft:  Gonets-M No.2
Chronologies: 2008 payload #38 ; 2008-025A ; 6,652nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications (strre-dump)
Families: 779th Military Communications Satellite ;
Ranks: 3,694th Military Spacecraft (2,442nd Russian) ; 3,498th Russian Spacecraft (2,442nd Military).
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 23 May 2008 at 15h20 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by Rockot/Briz-KM.
Orbit: Circular at about 1,500 km x 82.5° x 116 min.
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 655 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; RSNF's 23 May 08 ; SpaceflightNow's 23 May 08 ;
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Kosmos 2438
Spacecraft: Gonets-M No.3
Chronologies: 2008 payload #39 ; 2008-025B ; 6,653rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications (strre-dump)
Families: 780th Military Communications Satellite ;
Ranks: 3,695th Military Spacecraft (2,443rd Russian) ; 3,499th Russian Spacecraft (2,443rd Military).
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 23 May 2008 at 15h20 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by Rockot/Briz-KM.
Orbit: Circular at about 1,500 km x 82.5° x 116 min.
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 655 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; RSNF's 23 May 08 ; SpaceflightNow's 23 May 08 ;
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Kosmos 2439
Spacecraft:  Gonets-M No.4
Chronologies: 2008 payload #40 ; 2008-025C ; 6,654th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (strre-dump)
Families: 781st Military Communications Satellite ;
Ranks: 3,696th Military Spacecraft (2,444th Russian) ; 3,500th Russian Spacecraft (2,444th Military).
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 23 May 2008 at 15h20 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by Rockot/Briz-KM.
Orbit: Circular at about 1,500 km x 82.5° x 116 min.
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 655 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; RSNF's 23 May 08 ; SpaceflightNow's 23 May 08 ;
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Yubileynyy
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #41 ; 2008-025D ; 6,655th spacecraft.
Type: Amateur/student
Families: 119th Ameteur/Student Satellite ;
Ranks: 2,959th Civilian Spacecraft (1,057th Russian) ; 3,501st Russian Spacecraft (1,057th Civilian).
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 23 May 2008 at 15h20 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by Rockot/Briz-KM.
Orbit: Circular at about 1,500 km x 82.5° x 116 min.
Mission: Yubilyeniy (Jubilee) is a test satellite with an amateur radio payload to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Sputnik.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ; RSNF's 23 May 08 ; SpaceflightNow's 23 May 08 ;
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FY-3A / Feng Yun 3A 
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #42 ; 2008-026A ; 6,656th spacecraft.
Type: Meteorology
Families: 170th Civilian Meteorological Satellite (9th Chinese) ;
Ranks: 2,960th Civilian spacecraft (60th Chinese) ; 114th Chinese spacecraft (60th Civilian).
Sponsor: China Meteorological Administration
Launch: 27 May 2008 at 3h02 UTC,  from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3A
Orbit:
Mission: Fengyun 3A is 2,295-kg meteorological satellite that carries out three-dimensional, all-weather, multi-spectrum quantitative detection and acquire data from ground surfaces, oceans and space to facilitate precise weather forecasting. It is equipped with advanced detectors such as an infrared scan actinograph and a microwave formatter. The satellite sends back images with a spatial resolution of 250 metres and its temperature sensitivity will be in the region of 0.1 degree F. Currently, the highest spatial resolution of existing Chinese satellites is 1.1 km. Sinch the craft provides accurate and timely information about weather changes during the Beijing Olympic Games and works with the existing FY-2; it is considered by China as its “second weather satellite for the Olympic Games.”  The satellite was developed by the Shanghai Academy of Space flight Technology for the China Meteorological Administration (CMA).  China has launched nine meteorological satellites since the 1988 (4 Fengyun-1 series and 4 Fengyun-2 series, plus thiss firt Fengyun-3) and plans to launch another 22 meteorological satellites by 2020, including four more from the Fengyun-2 series, 12 from the Fengyun-3 series and six from the Fengyun-4 series.
Notes: Contracts were signed on 18 September 2002 for the development of Fengyun 3 meteorological satellite. This will be China's second-generation sun-synchronous orbiting) satellite that will provide global weather information.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 596 ; Spacewarn No. 655 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; China Daily's 27 May 08 & 28 May 08 ; SpaceflightNow's 27 May 08 ; Xinhua’s 18 Sep 02 ; SkyRocket's  ;
The FY-3A launched by a Chang Zheng 3A
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STS-124 / ISS 1J
Spacecraft:  Space Shuttle's 123rd flight, Discovery's 35th flight and 26th Shuttle flight to ISS. .
Chronologies: 2008 payload #43 ; 2008-027A ; 6,657th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families: 75th ISS Operation (26th American)
Ranks: 2,961st Civilian spacecraft (628th American) ; 1774th American (628th Civilian)
Sponsor: NASA

Source: NASA
ISS at Discovery Arrival STS-124 Payloads
Launch: 31 May 2008 at 21h02 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit: Docked to ISS: 336.3 km x 343.5 km x 51.64° x 91.33 min.
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 597 ; Spacewarn No. 655 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
Space Shuttle STS-124 Launched (Source: NASA KSC)
The International Space Station at the completion of STS-124 and anatomy of the principal components of the station.
(Photos S124-E-010042, S124-E-009968, S124-E-009973.& S124-E-010186)
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Kibo Pressurized Module (JPM)
Spacecraft: 
Chronologies: 2008 payload #44 ; 2008 n/a ; 6,658th spacecraft.
Type: Space Sataion Component
Families:
Ranks: 2,962nd Civilian spacecraft (112th Japanese) ; 120th Japanese (112th Civilian).
Sponsor: Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA
Photo S124-E-006127 Photo S124-E-007090 Photo S124-E-006894 Photo S124-E-007018
Launch: 31 May 2008 at 21h02 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 597 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Zhongxing 9 (Chinasat 9)
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #45 ; 2008-028A ; 6,659th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (DBS)
Families:
Ranks: 2,962nd Civilian spacecraft (61st Chinese) :115th Chinese (61st Civilian).
Sponsor: China Satcom
Launch: 9 June 2008 at 12h15 UTC UTC, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3B.
Orbit: Geostationary at 92.2° East longitude.
Mission: Zhongxing-9 is a communications satelite used for live television broadcast to be use during the Beijing Olympic Games in August.  The craft was ordered by China Satcom from the France-based Thales Alenia Space,
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 597 ; Spacewarn No. 656 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; China Daily's 9 Jun 08SkyRocket's  ;
The launch of Zhongxing 9 onboard a Chang Zheng rocket.
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GLAST
Spacecraft: GLAST stands for Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope
Chronologies: 2008 payload #46 ; 2008-029A ; 6,660th spacecraft.
Type: Astronomy
Families:
Ranks: 2,964th Civilian spacecraft (629th American) ; 1775th American (629th Civilian).
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 11 June 2008 at 16h05 UTC, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-17B, by a Delta 2920H-10 .
Orbit: 542 km  x 561 km x 25.6°
Mission: GLAST is an astronomy satellite that studies gamma rays in a range of energies from thousands to hundreds of billions of times more energetic than the light visible to the human eye.  Its main instrument is the Large Area Telescope which could view 20% of the sky at a time with a spatial resolution of a few arcminutes - unprecedented in a high energy gamma-ray satellite. LAT is a successor to COS-B and CGRO-EGRET, which represent a considerable improvement over its successful predecessor, the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. A secondary experiment, the Gamma Burst Monitor is a successor to CGRO-BATSE. GLAST focus on studying the most energetic objects and phenomena in the Universe. it observes gamma-ray sources near the edge of the visible Universe. Gamma rays detected by GLAST will originate near the otherwise obscured central regions of exotic objects like supermassive black holes, pulsars and gamma-ray bursts.  The 25.6 deg inclination is unusual and reduced the amount of time spent in the South Atlantic Anomaly improves the sensitivity of the observations.The mission is being designed for a lifetime of 5 years, with a goal of 10 years of operations. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 597 ; Spacewarn No. 656 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ;NASA's GLAST ; SkyRocket's ; NASA's 2010-2014 NASA News Releases ;
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Skynet 5C 
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #47 ; 2008-030A ; 6,661st spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks: 3,697th Military spacecraft (38th European) ; 298th European spacecraft (38th Military)
Sponsor: British Ministry of Defence
Launch: 12 June 2008 at 22h05 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 17.8° West longitude.
Mission: Skynet 5C is a 4,700-kg military communications satellite for the British Ministry of Defence (MoD). The Skynet 5 series provides resilient, survivable and secure communications for military and government users, carrying hardened Ultra High and Super High Frequency (UHF/SHF) communications with multiple, steerable spot beams. Skynet 3C is a 3-axis stabilized EUROSTAR E3000 platform measuring 4.5 x 2.9 x 3.7 meters (with in-orbit span of 34 metres) that has a 15-year lifespan. Built by Astrium, it was launcheded on behalf of Astrium, which in turn delivers it in orbit to Paradigm, which provides secure telecom services to the British Armed Forces, NATO and other countries. It is the 30th military payload launched by Ariane. 
Note: This 183rd Ariane mission is Ariane 5’s 39th launch and its 25th consecutive commercial success. The launcher was carrying a total payload of 8,541 kg, including 7,745 kg for the two satellites
     Arianespace was founded in 1980 as the world’s first launch service & solutions company. Today, it has 23 shareholders from ten European countries (including French space agency CNES with 34%, EADS with 30%, and all European companies participating in the construction of Ariane launchers). Since the outset, the company has signed 292 launch contracts and launched 257 satellites. More than two-thirds of the commercial satellites now in service worldwide were launched by Arianespace. Arianespace won over half of the commercial launch contracts up for bid worldwide in the last two years, and has now  a backlog of more than 40 satellites to be launched. The company posted sales of more than 900 million euros in 2007 and has 292 employees.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 597 ; Spacewarn No. 656 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Arianespace's 12 Jun 08 & Press Kit ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Turksat 3A
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #48 ; 2008-030B ; 6,662nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks: 2,965th Civilian spacecraft (6th Turk) ; 6th Turk (6th Civilian).
thSponsor: Turkey
Launch: 12 June 2008 at 22h05 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostarionaty at 42° East longitude.
Mission: Turksat 3A is a 3,110-kg (1,272 kg dry) communications satellite fitted with 24 Ku-band transponders that delivers communications services as well as broadcast TV channels, multimedia and Internet services in Europe, Turkey and Central Asia. The satellite was built by Thales Alenia Space for Turksat AS, as part of a turnkey contract. The craft is a 3-axis stabilized Spacebus 4000 B2 platform measuring 2.8 x 1.8 x 2.9 metres (29.6 metres span in orbit) with a 20-year lifespan. It is the fifth Turkish satellite launched by Arianespace. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 597 ; Spacewarn No. 656 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Arianespace's 12 Jun 08 & Press Kit ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Orbcomm CDS-1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #49 ; 2008-031 ; 6,663rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbcomm Inc.
Launch: 19 June 2008 at 6h36 UTC, from Kapustin Yar Cosmodrome's LC-107, by a Kosmos 3M.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 597 ; Spacewarn No. 656 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Orbcomm's 19 June 08 ; SpaceflightNow's 19 Jun 08SkyRocket's  ;
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Orbcomm R-1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #50 ; 2008-031 ; 6,664th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbcomm Inc.
Launch: 19 June 2008 at 6h36 UTC, from Kapustin Yar Cosmodrome's LC-107, by a Kosmos 3M.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 597 ; Spacewarn No. 656 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Orbcomm's 19 June 08 ; SpaceflightNow's 19 Jun 08SkyRocket's  ;
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Orbcomm R-2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #51 ; 2008-031 ; 6,665th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbcomm Inc.
Launch: 19 June 2008 at 6h36 UTC, from Kapustin Yar Cosmodrome's LC-107, by a Kosmos 3M.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 597 ; Spacewarn No. 656 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Orbcomm's 19 June 08 ; SpaceflightNow's 19 Jun 08SkyRocket's  ;
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Orbcomm R-3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #52 ; 2008-031 ; 6,666th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbcomm Inc.
Launch: 19 June 2008 at 6h36 UTC, from Kapustin Yar Cosmodrome's LC-107, by a Kosmos 3M.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 597 ; Spacewarn No. 656 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Orbcomm's 19 June 08 ; SpaceflightNow's 19 Jun 08SkyRocket's  ;
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Orbcomm R-4
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #53 ; 2008-031 ; 6,667th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbcomm Inc. 
Launch: 19 June 2008 at 6h36 UTC, from Kapustin Yar Cosmodrome's LC-107, by a Kosmos 3M.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 597 ; Spacewarn No. 656 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Orbcomm's 19 June 08 ; SpaceflightNow's 19 Jun 08SkyRocket's  ;
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Orbcomm R-5
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #54 ; 2008-031 ; 6,668th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbcomm Inc. 
Launch: 19 June 2008 at 6h36 UTC, from Kapustin Yar Cosmodrome's LC-107, by a Kosmos 3M.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 597 ; Spacewarn No. 656 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Orbcomm's 19 June 08 ; SpaceflightNow's 19 Jun 08SkyRocket's  ;
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OSTM/Jason 2
Spacecraft: OSTM sands for Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM
Chronologies: 2008 payload #55 ; 2008-032A ; 6,669th spacecraft.
Type: Earth/Space Science (Ocean Observations)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA, CNES, Eumetsat and NOAA

Source: NASA
Views of OSTM/Jason 2 satellite (Source: NASA)
Launch: 20 June 2008 at 7h46 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base, by a Delta II 7320.
Orbit: Circular at 1336 km x 66°
Mission: OSTM/Jason 2 is the 510-kg next-generation ocean altimetry satellite that extends the observations of sea surface topography begun by Topex-Poseidon and Jason 1. It carries the next generation instruments including CNES’s Poseidon-3 dual-frequency radar altimeter to measure sea surface height and NASA/JPL’s Advanced Microwave Radiometer (AMR) to remove the effects of water vapor from the altimetry measurement. Its precise measurement (3.3 centimeters) will help scientists better understand ocean circulation and its effect on global climate. This mission works in combination with several other missions, including the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment, which measures Earth’s mass distribution, QuikScat, which measures near-surface ocean winds, and Aquarius (to be launched in 2009) which measures ocean surface salinity. Three additional new instruments are also onboard: Japan’s Light Particle Telescope (LPT) and France’s Environment Characterization and Modelisation-2 (Carmen-2) to study radiation in the satellite environment, and France’s Time Transfer by Laser Link (T2L2) that used a laser link to make high-accuracy comparison and synchronization of remote ground clocks. In addition to the basic scientific interest, these instruments will allow for enhancements in data quality and accuracy for future ocean altimetry missions. Jason 2 is a four-partner mission with NASA, CNES, the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (Eumetsat), and NOAA. The spacecraft is operations by NOAA and Eumetsat and its data are available to the international science community via the U.S. (NOAA) and European data centers (EUMETSAT, CNES).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 597 ; Spacewarn No. 656 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 NASA's OSTM/Jason 2 ; SkyRocket's ; NASA's 2010-2014 NASA News Releases ;
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Kosmos 2440
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #56 ; 2008-033A ; 6,670th spacecraft.
Type: Missile Early Warning
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 26 June 2008 at 23h59 UTC, from Baikonur Cosmodrome, by a Proton .
Orbit: Geosynchronous 
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 597 ; Spacewarn No. 656 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SpaceflightNow' s 27 Jun 08SkyRocket's  ;
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ProtoStar I
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #57 ; 2008-034A ; 6,671st spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Direct Broadcasting)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ProtoStar Ltd.
Launch: 7 July 2008 at 21h47 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 98.5° East longitude.
Mission: ProtoStar 1 is a 4,200-kg (at launch, 1,774-kg dry) communications satellite that provide relay capacity over Asia for direct-to-home television broadcasting as well as broadband communication requirements across the region. It is the first satellite for a new operator: ProtoStar telecommunciations service provider. The craft is fitted with 16 Ku-band transponders and 38 C-band transponders. Built by Space Systems/Loral using an FS1300 platform, ProtoStar I is 3-axis stabilized satellite measuring 3.8 x 2.4 x 2.1 metres (with an in-orbit span of 31.1 metres), and with a 15-year designed lifespan. 
Launch: The 184th Ariane mission, the 40th Ariane 5 launch, was carrying a total payload of 8,639 kg, including 7,537 kg for the two satellites. The countdown was performed without interruption, leading to an on-time liftoff just prior sunset, providing a rare daylight view of the launcher's ascent. The weather allowed tracking cameras to follow the launcher’s trajectory for well over two minutes, which included the separation of both solid boosters at an altitude of approximately 65 km. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 598 ; Spacewarn No. 657 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Arianespace's 7 Jul 08 & Press Kit ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Badr 6
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #58 ; 2008-034B ; 6,672nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Direct Broadcasting)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Abarsat
Launch: 7 July 2008 at 21h47 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 26° East longitude.
Mission: Badr-6 is a 3,400-kg (at launch, 1,510-kg dry) direct-broadcast satellite, equipped with 24 C-band and 20 Ku-band transponders that provides TV broadcasting services for the entire Middle East and North Africa. Along with other satellites in the Badr constellation, it provides services to more than 130 million TV viewers stretching from Morocco to the Persian Gulf, and over a large part of sub-Saharan Africa. Jointly built by EADS Astrium and Thales Alenia Space using an Eurostar 2000+ platform, Badr-6 is a 3-axis stabilized satellite measuring 2.9 x 1.75 x 2.5 metres (with an in-orbit span of 32 metres) and with a 15-year life expectancy.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 598 ; Spacewarn No. 657 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ;  Arianespace's 7 Jul 08 & Press Kit ; SkyRocket's  ;
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EchoStar XI 
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #59 ; 2008-035A ; 6,673rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Direct Broadcast)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: DISH Network Corporation (EchoStar)
Launch: 16 July 2008 at 5h21 UTC, from the Odyssey Launch Platform, by a Zenit-3SL.
(The Odyssey platform was positioned on the Equator by 154°  West Longitude.)
Orbit: Geostationary at 110° West Longitude.
Mission: EchoStar XI is a 5,511-kg, 20-kW direct broadcast satellite designed to expand capacity for DISH Network Corporation (formerly EchoStar), which provides to 14 million satellite TV customers hundreds of video and audio channels and interactive TV applications.  Built by Space Systems/Lora, the satellite is based on SS/L’s 1300 bus and is designed for an orbital service life of 15 years. With this launch, there are 55 Space Systems/Loral -built geostationary satellites in orbit. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 598 ; Spacewarn No. 657 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Sea Launch's 16 Jul 08 & EchoStar XI ; SS/Loral's 28 May 08 & 16 Jul 08 ; SkyRocket's  ;
Launch of EchoStar XI by a Zenit rocket. (Source: Sea Launch)
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SAR-Lupe 5
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #60 ; 2008-036A ; 6,674th spacecraft.
Type: Radar Surveaillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: German Ministry of Defense and the Federal Office of Defense Technology and Procurement
Launch: 22 July 2008 at 2h40 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome, by a Kosmos-3M.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 598 ; Spacewarn No. 657 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SpaceflightNow's 22 Jul 08 ; OHB-Systgem's 22 Jul 08SkyRocket's  ;
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Kosmos 2441
Spacecraft: Persona No. 1
Chronologies: 2008 payload #61 ; 2008-037A ; 6,675th spacecraft.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russia Defense Ministry
Launch: 26 July 2008 at 18h31 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's 34/4, by a Soyuz-2.1b.
Orbit: 210 km x 770 km x 98.3° s 94 min.
Mission: The new optical reconnaissance satellite Persona, designated Cosmos-2441, failed shortly after beginning its operations. According to a report in Rossiyskaya Gazeta, the deputy prime minister, Sergey Ivanov, criticized the industry for a string of satellite failures - Monitor, KazSat, and Persona. The reports said that in the Persona case, it was the electronics of the satellite that failed. It is hard to say exactly when the satellite failure occurred. However, Cosmos-2441 has not been performing any orbit-correction maneuvers since mid-September 2008.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 598 ; Spacewarn No. 657 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; RSNF's 26 Jul 08 & 13 Feb 09 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Trailblazer
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #62 ; 2008 1st loss ; 6,676th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 3 August 2008 at 3h34 UTC, from Omelek Island, by a Falcon 1.
(Omelek Island, in the Kwajalein Atoll, is located  4,000 kilometres southwest of Hawaii in the Central Pacific.)
Orbit: n/a
Mission: Trailblazer is a 83.5-kg experimental spacecraft part of the Jumpstart Program of the Defense Department's Operationally Responsive Space to demonstrate the rapid construction, testing and launch of a low-cost satellite for the military.  Developed by SpaceDev, the craft aims to prove that small spacecraft can be built and put aboard a rocket within a few months.  This was the first mission of the Jumpstart project, which also tests the flexibility of payload managers and launch providers by simultaneously preparing three payloads for a single launch. Engineers had to be prepared to support launching any of the spacecraft reviewed by military leaders. Military officials evaluated three spacecraft for the Jumpstart mission, eventually selecting the Trailblazer. The satellite was constructed in less than five months, meeting schedule and budget criteria set by the ORS program office.
Falcon 003 Payloads: The Falcon 1 also carried PreSat, Nanosail-D and Celestis' Explorers Flight as well as it tested a payload adapter developed by Malaysian engineers. The adapter will connect the rocket to the RazakSat 2 spacecraft from Malaysia on the Falcon 1's next launch later this year.
Launch: On 3 August, at 3h00 GMT - after four hours of delays - the Falcon 1’s main engine fired but one of the propulsion parameters was about 1% out of range, triggering the launch abort in the final moments before liftoff. The launch team was able to resolve the issue quickly and the rocket lifted off 34 minutes later, at 15h34 local) time.  An onboard camera appeared to show some oscillations during the ascent. Whether that was normal or a sign of trouble is not yet clear. About two minutes and 20 seconds into the ascent, the video broadcast was abruptly terminated, the rocket was still flying with no obvious indication of a serious malfunction  A company spokesperson then said: "We are hearing from the launch control center that there has been an anomaly on the vehicle. We don't have any information about what that anomaly is at this time. We will, of course, be doing an assessment of the situation and providing information as soon as it becomes available."  In fact, the Falcon 1 reached an altitude of 217 km when its first stage collided with the second stage due to residual thrust from the upgraded Merlin engine, 
     “It was obviously a big disappointment not to reach orbit on this flight, said SpaceX founder Elon Musk.  On the plus side, the flight of our first stage, with the new Merlin 1C engine that will be used in Falcon 9, was picture perfect.  Unfortunately, a problem occurred with stage separation, causing the stages to be held together.  […] The most important message I’d like to send right now is that SpaceX will not skip a beat in execution going forward.  We have flight four of Falcon 1 almost ready for flight and flight five right behind that.  I have also given the go ahead to begin fabrication of flight six.  Falcon 9 development will also continue unabated, taking into account the lessons learned with Falcon 1.  We have made great progress this past week with the successful nine engine firing. There should be absolutely zero question that SpaceX will prevail in reaching orbit and demonstrating reliable space transport.”  On 6 August 2008, the company reported: “It looks like we may have flight four on the launch pad as soon as next month.”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 598National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SpaceflightNow's 3 Augt 07, 6 Aug 08 & Mission ; SpaceX's Flight 3 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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PreSat
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #63 ; 2008 2nd loss ; 6,677th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA

Source: NASA
Launch: 3 August 2008 at 3h34 UTC, from Omelek Island, by a Falcon 1.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: PRESat, PharmaSat Risk Evaluation Satellite, is a micro-laboratory equipped with sensors and optical systems that can detect the growth, density and health of yeast cells. It was also monitor the levels of pressure, temperature, and acceleration. PRESat would have create a stable, space science laboratory using innovative environment control and biological detection techniques. The PRESat-NanoSail-D nanosatellites provides an opportunity to demonstrate NASA-developed spaceflight technologies and the Ames-developed modular approach to constructing of satellites . This mission provides NASA with a unique opportunity to evaluate how our nanosatellite spacecraft and its payload perform, while demonstrating our ability to conduct fast turn-around, low-cost spaceflight projects. This same approach was used successfully on a previous mission, GeneSat, and will be used for the upcoming PharmaSat mission, scheduled to launch later this year. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 598 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Nanosail-D
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #64 ; 2008 3rd loss ; 6,678th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA

Source: NASA
Launch: 3 August 2008 at 3h34 UTC, from Omelek Island, by a Falcon 1.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: NanoSail-D was to have unfurled, for the first time in history, a 9-square metres solar sail, made of ultra-thin, light gossamer fabric. With this sail, scientists had hoped to detect the slight changes in NanoSail's orbit due to solar pressure and aerodynamic drag a few days into the mission, proving the concept of propellant-less space propulsion technologies using a solar sail. Packed inside the NanoSail-D satellite the sail was made of ultra-thin, light gossamer fabric, coated with a layer of aluminum to enhance its thrust-producing properties. The reflective sails are designed to intercept the constantly streaming solar energy and change the orbit of the spacecraft. Marshall Space Flight Center provided materials for the NanoSail-D spacecraft and the solar sail payload, including harvesting the sail material from an earlier solar sail propulsion mission. The team also includes academic and industry partners who provided economical commercial-off-the-shelf components that were quickly configured and integrated to create the satellite.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 598 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; NASA's Nanosail-D& UpdateSkyRocket's  ;
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Celestis' Explorers Flight
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #65 ; 2008 4th loss ; 6,679th spacecraft.
Type:
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Space Services Inc.
Launch: 3 August 2008 at 3h34 UTC, from Omelek Island, by a Falcon 1.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: Two small Celestis capsules containing the ashes of more than 200 people, including astronaut Gordon Cooper and Star Trek actor James Doohan. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 598 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Space Services' Explorers FlightSkyRocket's  ;
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Superbird 7 / Superbird C-2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #66 ; 2008-038A ; 6,680th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Japan's Space Communications Corporation (SCC) 
Launch: 14 August 2008 at 20h44 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA
Orbit: Geostarionaty at 144°  East longitude
Mission: Superbird 7 is a 4,820-kg (2,018 kg dry) communications satellite that carries 28 Ku-band transponders to provide DTH, internet and television services to Japan, East-Asia, and the Pacific region.  Also known as Superbird C-2, it provides mobile terminal, cable TV and direct TV broadcast services for the entire Asia-Pacific region.  Also known as Superbird C-2, the satelite replaces the aging Superbird-C. Built by Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Superbird-7 is based on a DS 2000 platform, it is a 3-axis stabilized craft, measuring 6.3 x 3.7 x 3.0 metres (which span 31.6 metres in orbit) and has a designed lifetime of 15-years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 599 ; Spacewarn No. 658 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Arianespace's 14 Aug 08 & Press Kit ; SCC's 15 Aug 08 ; SkyRocket's  ; 
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AMC 21 / Americom 21
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #67 ; 2008-038B ; 6,681st spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: SES Americom
Launch: 14 August 2008 at 20h44 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA
Orbit: Geostationary at 125° West longitude.
Mission: AMC 21, also known as Americom 21, is a 2,473-kg (1,161 kg dry) communications satellite that carries 24 Ku-band transponders and two reflector antennas to provide television services and broadband connectivity to the United States, Canada, Mexico and Caribbean countries. The satellite is operated by SES AMERICOM, the American operating company of the Luxembourg-based SES group and is the 20th satellite from the SES group. Built by Thales Alenia Space using a Star-2 platform from Orbital Sciences Corporation, AMC-21 is 3-axis stabilized craft measuring 2.3 x 3.2 x 2.3 metres (with a 22-metre wingspan in orbit) and has a designed lifespan of 15 years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 599 ; Spacewarn No. 658 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Arianespace's 14 Aug 08 & Press Kit ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Iranian Test
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload n/a ; n/a ;n/a.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Iran
Launch: 16 August 2008 at 19h32 UTC, from Semnan, by a Safir.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: On 17 August, the Iranian’s Fars news agency reported the launch of the Omid ('Hope') satellite. However, other reports indicate that this was either a suborbital test or a launch of a dummy satellite, and that the Omid satellite was not aboard. According to some sources, the second stage failed catastrophically at 152 km. Thus, that launch could eighter be a suborbital test launch of a prototype satellite launch vehicle, or a failed orbital attempt, since no satellite reached orbit.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 599 ; BBC 17 Aug 08, & 16 Aug 08 ; Xinhua 16 Aug 08 ,   Reuter 19 Aug 08 ; New York Times, 17 Aug 08 ;  MSNBC 19 Aug 08 ,
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Inmarsat 4 F3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #68 ; 2008-039A ; 6,682nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Inmarsat
Launch: 18 August 2008 at 22h43 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-200/39, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 98° West longitude
Mission: Inmarsat 4F3 is a 5,960-kg communications satellite that carries 200 spot-beams to relay messages from mobile phones based on land, sea and air.  The satellite is the third in the Inmarsat’s I-4 constellation, concluding a decade of development and a US$1.5 billion investment. The satellite is a Eurostar 3000GM model built by EADS Astrium. The current constellation of two Inmarsat-4 satellites delivers mobile broadband services to 85% of the world's landmass, covering 98% of the world's population. The third I-4 will complete the global coverage for Inmarsat's broadband services. According to the company, the Inmarsat-4s are the world's most sophisticated commercial network for mobile voice and data services. Inmarsat satellites are used by shipping, oil exploration, defence and aviation industries to service their communications needs. Inmarsat is also the communications channel of choice for the media when reporting from the world's danger zones and for NGOs, government agencies and the United Nations when coordinating rescue efforts. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 599 ; Spacewarn No. 658 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Spaceflight Now's 19 Aug 08Inmarsat's 18 Aug 08 ; ILS's 18 Aug 08SkyRocket's  ;
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Tachys
Spacecraft: Tachys is the Greek word meaning rapid.
Chronologies: 2008 payload #69 ; 2008-040A ; 6,683rd spacecraft.
Type: Earth Imaging
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: RapidEye AG 
Launch: 29 August 2008 at 7h16 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Initial: 585 km x 609 km x 98.0° x 97 min.
Mission: Five identical 150-kg Earth imaging satellites that take multi-spectral, 6.5-metre resolution images to be sold to agricultural, forestry and town-planning enterprises. RapidEye's primary applications include monitoring crops and giving farmers, insurance companies and disaster relief organizations critical information following a natural catastrophe. The fleet will be able to cover any place on Earth within one day and image all agricultural regions of Europe and North America within five days.  The constellation, which had a planned 7 year lifespan, differentiated for other Earth-imaging system by rapid response and timely products. Each satellite have an orbital spacing of about 19 minutes, allowing frequent revisits over the same area.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 599 ; Spacewarn No. 658 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SpaceflightNow's 29 Aug 08RapidEye's 29 Aug 08 & News ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Mati
Spacecraft: Mati is the Greek word meaning eye.
Chronologies: 2008 payload #70 ; 2008-040B ; 6,684th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Imaging
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: RapidEye AG 
Launch: 29 August 2008 at 7h16 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Initial: 585 km x 609 km x 98.0° x 97 min.
Mission: Five identical 150-kg Earth imaging satellites that take multi-spectral, 6.5-metre resolution images to be sold to agricultural, forestry and town-planning enterprises. RapidEye's primary applications include monitoring crops and giving farmers, insurance companies and disaster relief organizations critical information following a natural catastrophe. The fleet will be able to cover any place on Earth within one day and image all agricultural regions of Europe and North America within five days.  The constellation, which had a planned 7 year lifespan, differentiated for other Earth-imaging system by rapid response and timely products. Each satellite have an orbital spacing of about 19 minutes, allowing frequent revisits over the same area.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 599 ; Spacewarn No. 658 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SpaceflightNow's 29 Aug 08RapidEye's 29 Aug 08 & News ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Choma
Spacecraft: Choma is the Greek word meaning Earth
Chronologies: 2008 payload #71 ; 2008-040C ; 6,685th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Imaging
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: RapidEye AG 
Launch: 29 August 2008 at 7h16 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Initial: 585 km x 609 km x 98.0° x 97 min.
Mission: Five identical 150-kg Earth imaging satellites that take multi-spectral, 6.5-metre resolution images to be sold to agricultural, forestry and town-planning enterprises. RapidEye's primary applications include monitoring crops and giving farmers, insurance companies and disaster relief organizations critical information following a natural catastrophe. The fleet will be able to cover any place on Earth within one day and image all agricultural regions of Europe and North America within five days.  The constellation, which had a planned 7 year lifespan, differentiated for other Earth-imaging system by rapid response and timely products. Each satellite have an orbital spacing of about 19 minutes, allowing frequent revisits over the same area.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 599 ; Spacewarn No. 658 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SpaceflightNow's 29 Aug 08RapidEye's 29 Aug 08 & News ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Choros
Spacecraft: Choros is the Greek word meaning space.
Chronologies: 2008 payload #72 ; 2008-040D ; 6,686th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Imaging
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: RapidEye AG 
Launch: 29 August 2008 at 7h16 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Initial: 585 km x 609 km x 98.0° x 97 min.
Mission: Five identical 150-kg Earth imaging satellites that take multi-spectral, 6.5-metre resolution images to be sold to agricultural, forestry and town-planning enterprises. RapidEye's primary applications include monitoring crops and giving farmers, insurance companies and disaster relief organizations critical information following a natural catastrophe. The fleet will be able to cover any place on Earth within one day and image all agricultural regions of Europe and North America within five days.  The constellation, which had a planned 7 year lifespan, differentiated for other Earth-imaging system by rapid response and timely products. Each satellite have an orbital spacing of about 19 minutes, allowing frequent revisits over the same area.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 599 ; Spacewarn No. 658 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SpaceflightNow's 29 Aug 08RapidEye's 29 Aug 08 & News ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Trochia
Spacecraft: Trochia is the Greek word meaning orbit.
Chronologies: 2008 payload #73 ; 2008-040E ; 6,687th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Imaging
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: RapidEye AG 
Launch: 29 August 2008 at 7h16 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-109, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Initial: 585 km x 609 km x 98.0° x 97 min.
Mission: Five identical 150-kg Earth imaging satellites that take multi-spectral, 6.5-metre resolution images to be sold to agricultural, forestry and town-planning enterprises. RapidEye's primary applications include monitoring crops and giving farmers, insurance companies and disaster relief organizations critical information following a natural catastrophe. The fleet will be able to cover any place on Earth within one day and image all agricultural regions of Europe and North America within five days.  The constellation, which had a planned 7 year lifespan, differentiated for other Earth-imaging system by rapid response and timely products. Each satellite have an orbital spacing of about 19 minutes, allowing frequent revisits over the same area.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 599 ; Spacewarn No. 658 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SpaceflightNow's 29 Aug 08RapidEye's 29 Aug 08 & News ; SkyRocket's  ;
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HJ-1A / Huan Jing-1A
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #74 ; 2008-041A ; 6,688th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 6 September 2008 at 3h25 UTC, from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2C.
Orbit: 627 km x 670 km x 98.01°x 97.6 min.
Mission: Huan Jing 1A and Huan Jing 1B are two environmental satellites that carry optical and infrared cameras to monitor natural disasters like earthquakes and floods. They closely track natural disasters and provide quick assessments of damage to guide rescue and reconstruction work. First of their kind for China, they were expected to enhance China’s capacity to forecast natural disasters during their expected ifespan of more than three years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 600 ; Spacewarn No. 659 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; China Daily's 6 Sep 08 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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HJ-1B / Huan Jing-1B
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #75 ; 2008-041B ; 6,689th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 6 September 2008 at 3h25 UTC, from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2C.
Orbit: 627 km x 670 km x 98.01°x 97.6 min.
Mission: Huan Jing 1A and Huan Jing 1B are two environmental satellites that carry optical and infrared cameras to monitor natural disasters like earthquakes and floods. They closely track natural disasters and provide quick assessments of damage to guide rescue and reconstruction work. First of their kind for China, they were expected to enhance China’s capacity to forecast natural disasters during their expected ifespan of more than three years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 600 ; Spacewarn No. 659 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; China Daily's 6 Sep 08 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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GeoEye 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #76 ; 2008-042A ; 6,690th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: US National Geo-spatial Intelligence Agency (NGA)
Launch: 6 September 2008 at 18h51 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-2W, by a Delta II.7420
Orbit: 671 km x 687 km x 98.1° s 98.3 min. 
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 600 ; Spacewarn No. 659 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; GeoEye 6 Sep 08 & 8 Oct 08  ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Progress M-65 / ISS 30P 
Spacecraft: Progress M (7K-TGM) No. 365
Chronologies: 2008 payload #77 ; 2008-043A ; 6,691st spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Space Agency
Launch: 10 September 2008 at 19h50 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1/5, by a Soyuz U.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 600 ; Spacewarn No. 659 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Nimiq 4
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #78 ; 2008-044A ; 6,692nd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Telesat Canada 
Launch: 24 September 2008 at 19h28 UTC, from Odyssey Launch Platform, by a Proton-M/Briz-M..
Orbit: Geostationary at 82° West longitude.
Mission: Nimiq 4 is a 4,850-kg communications satellite equipped with 32 transponders in Ku-band and 8 in Ka-band. The comsat is fully leased to Bell TV to enable the company to expand its HDTV digital satellite television services over North America. The spacecraft has a solar array wing span of 39 meters and an expected 15-year mission life. Nimiq 4 was built by EADS Astrium.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 600 ; Spacewarn No. 659 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Telesat's 20 Sep 08  ;  SkyRocket's  ;
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Galaxy 19
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #79 ; 2008-045A ; 6,793rd spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Intelsat
Launch: 24 September 2008 at 9h28 UTC, from Odyssey Launch Platform, by a Zenit-3SL.
Orbit: Geostationary at 97º West longitude.
Mission: Galaxy 19 is a communications satellite that covered the United Statei, Caribbean, Canada and Mexico, for video, government and network customers. It joins Intelsat’s North American Galaxy fleet comprising 16 other satellites. Built by Space Systems/Loral, Galaxy 19 replaced Galaxy 25. spacecraft. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 600 ; Spacewarn No. 659 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Intelsat's 24 Sep 08 & Fact Sheet ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Kosmos 2442
Spacecraft: Glonass No. 724
Chronologies: 2008 payload #80 ; 2008-046A ; 6,694th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 25 September 2008 at 8h49 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/24, by a Proton-M/DM-2.
Orbit:
Mission: Kosmos 2442 is a Russian navigation satellite.  It is Glonass No. 724 placed in plane 3, slot 18. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 600 ; Spacewarn No. 659 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; RSNF's 25 Sep 08 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Kosmos 2443
Spacecraft: Glonass No. 725
Chronologies: 2008 payload #81 ; 2008-046C ; 6,695th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 25 September 2008 at 8h49 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/24, by a Proton-M/DM-2.
Orbit:
Mission: Kosmos 2443 is a Russian navigation satellite.  It is Glonass No. 725 placed in plane 3, slot 21.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 600 ; Spacewarn No. 659 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; RSNF's 25 Sep 08 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Kosmos 2444
Spacecraft: Glonass No. 726
Chronologies: 2008 payload #82 ; 2008-046B ; 6,696th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 25 September 2008 at 8h49 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/24, by a Proton-M/DM-2.
Orbit:
Mission: Kosmos 2444 is a Russian navigation satellite.  It is Glonass No. 726 placed in plane 3, slot 22.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 600 ; Spacewarn No. 659 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; RSNF's 25 Sep 08 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Shenzhou VII
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #83 ; 2008-047A ; 6,697th spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceflight
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China 
Launch: 25 September 2008 at 1310 UTC, from Jiquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2F.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 600 ; Spacewarn No. 659 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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BX-1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #84 ; 2008-047G ; 6,698th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 25 September 2008 at 1310 UTC, from Jiquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2F.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 600 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; China Daily's 6 Oct 08, 7 Oct 08 & 7 Oct 08SkyRocket's  ; Space Review's 20 Oct 08 ;
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Ratsat
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #85 ; 2008-048A ; 6,699th spacecraft.
Type: Technology (Launcher Test)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: SpaceX
Launch: 28 September 2008 at 23h15 UTC, from Omelek Island, by a Falcon 1.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 601 ; Spacewarn No. 659 ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SpsceflightNow's 28 Sep 08 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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THEOS
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #86 ; 2008-049A ; 6,700th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Thailand
Launch: 1 October 2008 at 6h37 UTC, from Yasniy Missile Range, by a Dnepr.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 601 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SpsceflightNow's ; RSNC's 1 Oct 08SkyRocket's  ;
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Soyuz TMA-13 / ISS 17S
Spacecraft: Soyuz 11F732 (7K-STMA) No. 223
Chronologies: 2008 payload #87 ; 2008-050A ; 6,701st spacecraft.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Space Agency

Source: NASA
Launch: 12 October 2008 at 7h01 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz-FG
Orbit: Initial: 200.7 km x 259.89 km x 51.65°  z 88.81 min
At docking: 351.2 km x 368.4 km x  51.65°  91.5 min
Landing: 8 April 2009 àt 7h16 UTC at 151 km northeast of Dzezhkazgan.
Mission: Soyuz TMA-13 is a piloted transport ship that delivered to the International Space Station the Expedition 18 crew (ISS-18) of Commander Michael Fincke and Flight Engineer Yury Lonchakov, as well as the space flight participant Richard Garriotte under the program of the Visiting Mission 15.  Fincke is the first American to launch twice on a Soyuz.. The six-month Expedition 18 mission's main focus will be preparing the station to house six crew members on long-duration missions. Garriott is the son of former astronaut Owen Garriott. He and Expedition 17 Commander Sergey Volkov are the first children of previous space fliers to greet each other in orbit, since Volkov is the son of veteran cosmonaut Alexander Volkov. After two days of free flight, Soyuz TMA-13 docked in automatic mode with ISS on 14 October at 8h26 UTC.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 601 & 610 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SpsceflightNow's 12 Oct 08 & 14 Oct 08 ; NASA's   ; SkyRocket's  ;
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IBEX
Spacecraft: Interstellar Boundary Explorer
Chronologies: 2008 payload #88 ; 2008-051A ; 6,702nd spacecraft.
Type: Space Science
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 19 October 2008 at 17h47 UTC, from Kwajalein Island's RW-06/24 , by Pegasus XL.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SpsceflightNow's 20 Oct 08 ; NASA's 19 Oct 08 ; SkyRocket's  ; NASA's 2010-2014 NASA News Releases ;
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Chandraayan-1
Spacecraft: Chandrayaan means "moon craft" in Sanskrit.
Chronologies: 2008 payload #89 ; 2008-052A ; 6,703rd spacecraft.
Type: Planetary Probe
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO)
Launch: 22 October 2008 at 0h52 UTC, from Sriharikota's Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR's SL-2, by a PSLV.
Orbit: Initial Earth orbit: 255 km x 22,860 km x 17.9°
Mission: Chandrayaan-1 is a 1,380-kg lunar probe to perform remote sensing, mineralogical and chemical mapping for about two years using eleven scientific instruments built in India and five other countries.  Thi mission will create the most detailed global chemical map of the Moon showing mineral concentrations across the lunar surface. Researchers will also make a three-dimensional terrain map of the moon based on information yielded by the mission. Chandrayaan-1is India’s first deep-space mission, as the European Space Agency fund three payloads, while NASA provided two as Bulgarian scientists contributed a radiation monitor to the mission.   The spacecraft weighed about 1 380 kg at the time of its launch and is a 1.5-metre cuboid with a solar panel projecting from one of its sides. It was built at ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; ISRO's 22 Oct 08, 23 Oct 08 ; SpsceflightNow's 22 Oct 08 ; ESA's 22 Oct 08 ; NASA’s 1 Mar 10 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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MIP / Moon Impactor Probe
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #90 ; 2008 n/a ; 6,704th spacecraft.
Type: Planetary Probe
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO)
Launch: 22 October 2008 at 0h52 UTC, from Sriharikota's Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR's SL-2, by a PSLV.
Orbit:
Mission: The Moon Impact Probe (MIP) demonstrates the technologies required for landing a probe at the desired location on the Moon. It is also intended to qualify some of the technologies related to future soft landing missions. After Chandrayaan-1 will be finally lowered to its intended 100 km lunar orbit, the Moon Impact Probe will be ejected to hit the lunar surface in a chosen area.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; ISRO's Chandrayaan-1, 22 Oct 08 ; SpsceflightNow's 22 Oct 08 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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COSMO-Skymed 3 / COSMO-3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #91 ; 2008-053A ; 6,705th spacecraft.
Type: Radar Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Italian Space Agency and Italian Ministry of Defence
Launch: 25 October 2008 at 2h28 UTC, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-2W, by a Delta II 7420-10.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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SJ-6A-3 / Shi Jian 6A-3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #92 ; 2008-054A ; 6,706h spacecraft.
Type: Probably Electronic Intelligence
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 25 October 2008 at 1h15 UTC, from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4B.
Orbit: 580 km x 604 km x 97.7°
Mission: China news agency reports that this third pair of Shi Jian 6 satellites were performing environmental research. But lack of any details raises the suspicion that they are military surveillance satellites of some kind.  It is thus supposed that, under cover of the Shijian scientific research series, this SJ-6 pairs (as well as previous ones launched in 2004 and 2006) have a military electronic intelligence mission. It is reported that the satellites are built by the SAST group in Shanghai and the DFH Co. in Beijing, suggesting that in each pair the two satellites are of different design. The DFH Co. satellite is probably a CAST-968 300 kg-class minisatellite, and the SAST satellite might be based on the larger FY-1 weather satellite bus.
   Note: under the title “China successfully launches research satellites“”, China Dayli only published a photo of the of the launch with a simple caption that reads: “A Long March-4B rocket carrying two Shijian-6 research satellites for space environment investigation blasts off. from the launch pad at the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, north China's Shanxi Province, on Oct. 25, 2008.”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 602 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; China Daily's 25 Oct 08 ; Astronautica Encyclopedia's SJ-6 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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SJ-6B-3 / Shi Jian 6B-3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #93 ; 2008-054B ; 6,707th spacecraft.
Type: Probably Electronic Intelligence
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 26 October 2008 at 1h15 UTC, from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4B.
Orbit: 580 km x 604 km x 97.7°
Mission: China news agency reports that this third pair of Shi Jian 6 satellites were performing environmental research. But lack of any details raises the suspicion that they are military surveillance satellites of some kind.  It is thus supposed that, under cover of the Shijian scientific research series, this SJ-6 pairs (as well as previous ones launched in 2004 and 2006) have a military electronic intelligence mission. It is reported that the satellites are built by the SAST group in Shanghai and the DFH Co. in Beijing, suggesting that in each pair the two satellites are of different design. The DFH Co. satellite is probably a CAST-968 300 kg-class minisatellite, and the SAST satellite might be based on the larger FY-1 weather satellite bus.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 602 ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; China Daily's 25 Oct 08 ; Astronautica Encyclopedia's SJ-6 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Venezuela 1 / Venesat 1 / Simon Bolivar Satellite
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #94 ; 2008-055A ; 6,708th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Venezuala
Launch: 29 October 2008 at 16h54 UTC, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3B.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; China Daily's 30 Oct 08 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Chuanxin-1-02
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #95 ; 2008-056A ; 6,709th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 5 November 2008 at 0h15 UTC, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2D.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; China Daily's 5 Nov 08 ; Spaceflight's 5 Nov 08 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Shiyan Weixing 3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #96 ; 2008-056B ; 6,710th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 5 November 2008 at 0h15 UTC, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2D.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; China Daily's 5 Nov 08 ; Spaceflight's 5 Nov 08SkyRocket's  ;
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Astra 1M
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #97 ; 2008-057A ; 6,711th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: SES ASTRA 
Launch: 5 November 2008 at 20h44 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by a Proton .
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; Spaceflight's 6 Nov 08 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Kosmos 2445
Spacecraft: Kobalt-M #4
Chronologies: 2008 payload #98 ; 2008-058A ; 6,712th spacecraft.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 14 November 2008 at 15h50 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-16/2, by a Soyuz U.
Orbit: 180 km x 340 km x 67.16° x 89 min.
Mission: Kosmos 2445 isan optical reconnaissance satellite of the Kobalt-M type. This is the fourth Kobalt-M launch (the previous one being K osmos-2427). Nominal lifetime of these satellites, which use returnable film capsules, is about 60 days.
     Kosmos-2445 completed its mission and re-entered on 23 February 2009. This means that the satellite worked for 102 days, which is close to nominal lifetime of satellites of this class. hortly before the reentry, it produced two fragments; this appears to be a normal end-of-mission sequences for Kobalt satellites.
     As it turns out, the end of mission of the Cosmos-2445 satellite was not quite normal.  Its re-entry capsule landed in Bashkortostan in Russia, not in Kazakhstan, as these satellites normally do. The capsule reportedly landed at about 16h15 UTC. The landing created a mini-sensation for residents of the nearby villages: Aitovo, Dyusyanovo, and others, who took a few photos of the capsule before it was taken away by the military next morning.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; RSNV's 14 Nov 08, 23 Feb 09 & 28 Fev 09 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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STS-126 / ULF-2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #99 ; 2008-059A ; 6,713th spacecraft.
Type:
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor:
Launch: 15 November 2008 at 0h55 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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PSSC Testbed
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #100 ; 2008-059A ; 6,714th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: USAF
Launch: 15 November 2008 at 0h55 UTC, from Kennedy Space Center's LC-39A, by the Space Shuttle
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Progress M-01M / ISS 31P
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #101 ; 2008-060A ; 6,715th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Federal Space Agency
Launch: 26 November 2008 at 12h38 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1/5, by a Soyuz U.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Yaogan IV / Yaogan Weixing 4
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #102 ; 2008-061A ; 6,716th spacecraft.
Type: Probably Radar Surveillance (Officially: Earth Remote Sensing)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 1 December 2008 at 4h42 UTC, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2D.
Orbit:
Mission: According to China, Yaogan IV is “used for scientific research, land resources surveying, crop yield estimate and disaster prevention and relief, according to its chief developer, China Academy of Space Technology.“”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ;China Daily's 1 Dec 08 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Kosmos 2446
Spacecraft: 73D6
Chronologies: 2008 payload #103 ; 2008-062A ; 6,717th spacecraft.
Type: Missile Early Warning
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 2 December 2008 at 5h00 UTC, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-16/2, by a Molniya-M.
Orbit: ~600 km x ~39 000 km x 62,8° x 702 min..
Mission: Kosmos 2446 is a new early-warning satellite of the 73D6 type, which will work as part of the first-generation US-KS early-warning system  The satellite will join two other satellites of the US-KS/Oko constellation - Cosmos-2422 and Cosmos-2430. The new satellite is deployed in an orbital plane that is located between the orbital planes of these two satellites, which means that it will complement the constellation rather than replace one of the currently operational satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; SpacewarnNo.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; RSNF's 2 Dec 08SkyRocket's  ;
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Ciel-2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #104 ; 2008-063A ; 6,718th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Canada's Ciel Satellite Group
Launch: 10 December 2008 at 13h43 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome, by Proton-M/Briz .
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Yaogan V
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #105 ; 2008-064A ; 6,719th spacecraft.
Type: Probably Radar Surveillance (Officially: Earth Remote Sensing)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 15 December 2008 at  UTC, from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4B.
Orbit:
Mission: According to China, Yaogan V is “used for data collection and transmission involving land resources surveys, environmental surveillance and protection, urban planning, crop yield estimates, disaster prevention and reduction and space science experiments.” The satellite was developed by the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corp.,  Yaogan IV was launched only two weeks earlier as Yaogan III" was launched in November 2007.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; China Daily's 15 Dec 08 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Hot Bird 9
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #106 ; 2008-065A ; 6,720th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Eutelsat
Launch: 20 December 2008 at 22h35 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5  ECA.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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W2M
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #107 ; 2008-065B ; 6,721st spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Eutelsat
Launch: 20 December 2008 at 22h35 UTC, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5  ECA.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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FY-2E / Feng Yun 2E
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2008 payload #108 ; 2008-066A ; 6,722nd spacecraft.
Type: Meteorology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 23 December 2008 at 0h54 UTC, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3A.
Orbit: Geostationary 
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0 ; SkyRocket's  ;
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Kosmos 2447
Spacecraft: Glonass-M
Chronologies: 2008 payload #109 ; 2008-067A ; 6,723rd spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Dedfense Ministry
Launch: 25 December 2008 at 10h43 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81, by a Proton-M.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0  ; RSNF's 25 Dec 08 '; SkyRocket's  ;
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Kosmos 2448
Spacecraft: Glonass-M
Chronologies: 2008 payload #110 ; 2008-067B ; 6,724th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Dedfense Ministry
Launch: 25 December 2008 at 10h43 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81, by a Proton-M.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0  ; RSNF's 25 Dec 08 '; SkyRocket's  ;
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Kosmos 2449
Spacecraft: Glonass-M
Chronologies: 2008 payload #111 ; 2008-067C ; 6,725th spacecraft.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Dedfense Ministry
Launch: 25 December 2008 at 10h43 UTC, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81, by a Proton-M.
Orbit:
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  ; Spacewarn No.  ; National Space Science Data Center's 2007-0  ; RSNF's 25 Dec 08 '; SkyRocket's  ;
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© Claude Lafleur, 2009 Mes sites web: claudelafleur.qc.ca

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