Home 2014 Summary
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Spacecrafts launched in 2014:
1) GSAT-14 2) Thaicom 6 /AfriCom 1 3) Cygnus Orb-1 4) TDRS 12
5) Progress M-22M / ISS-54P 6) ABS-2 7) Athena-Fidus 8) Dove 5 / Flock 1-1
9) Dov 6 / Flock-1 2 10 Dove 7 / Flock-1 3 11) Dove 8 / Flock 1-4 12 Dove 9 / Flock 1-5
13) Dove 10 / Flock 1-6 14) Dove 15 / Flock 1-11 15) Dove 16 / Flock 1-12 16 Dove 17 / Flock 1-13
17) Dove 18 / Flock 1-14 18) Dove 19 / Flock 1-15 19) Dove 20 / Flock 1-16 20) Turksat 4A
21) Dove 11/ Flock 1-7 22) Dove 12 / Flock 1-8 23) Dove 13 / Flock 1-9 24) Dove 14 / Flock 1-10
25) Navstar 65 (USA 248) 26) Dove 21 / Flock 1-17 27) Dove 22 / Flock 1-18 28) Dove 25 / Flock 1-21
29) Dove 26 / Flock 1-22 30) Dove 23 / Flock 1-19 31) Dove 24 / Flock 1-20 32) Dove 27 / Flock 1-23
33) Dove 28 / Flock 1-24 34) Dove 29 / Flock 1-25 35) Dove 30 / Flock 1-26 36) GPM-CO
37) ShindaiSat 38) STARS-2 39) Teikyosat-3 40) ITF-1
41) OPUSat 42) Invader 43) K-SAT 2 44) Dove 31 / Flock 1-27
45) Dove 32 / Flock 1-28 48) SkyCube 1 47) Litsat 1 48) LituanicaSat-1
49) Ardusat-2 50) UAP-SAT 51) Express-AT 1 52) Express-AT 2
53) Astra 5B 54) Amazonas-4A 55) Glonass-M 56) Soyuz TMA-12M / ISS-38S
 57) SJ-11-06 / Shijian 11-06 58) DMSP-5D3 F-19 / DMSP 19 (USA 249) 59) Sentinel 1A 60) IRNSS 1B
 61) Progress M-23M / ISS-55P 62) 'Ofeq 10 / Ofek 10 63) NROL-67 (USA 250) 64) Egyptsat 2
 65) Dragon CRS-3 / SpaceX-3 66) SporeSat 67) PhoneSat-2.5 38) TSat
69) All-Star 70) KickSat 71) Luch 5V 72) KazSat 3
73) KazEOSat-1 / DZZ-HR 74) Yantar-4K2M-9 75) Ekspress-AM 4R 76) Navstar 66 (USA 251)
77) NROL-33 (USA 252) 78)  Strela-3M 79) Strela-3M 80) Strela-3M
81) Reshetnev Tech 2? 82) ALOS 2 / Daichi 2 83) Rising 2 / Raijin 2 84) UNIFORM 1
85) SOCRATES 86) SPROUT 87) Eutelsat 3B 88) Soyuz TMA-13M / ISS-39S
89) Glonass-M 55 90) Deimos 2 91) KazEOSat 2 92) Saudisat 4
93) TabletSat-Aurora 94) Tita / BugSat 1 95) AprizeSat 9 96) AprizeSat 10
97) Unisat 6 98) Tigris / Tigrisat 99) Lemur 1 100) ANTELSAT
101) Aerocube 6A 102) Aerocube 6B 103) BRITE-Toronto 104) BRITE-Montreal
105) Hodoyoshi 3 106) Hodoyoshi 4 107) Perseus-M 1 108) Perseus-M 2
109) POPSAT-HIP1 110) QB50P1 / EO-79 111) QB50P2 / EO-80 112) PACE
113) NanoSatC-Br 1 114) Duchifat 1 115) PolyITAN 1 116) DTUSat 2
117) Flock 1c-1 118) Flock 1c-2 119) Flock 1c-3 120) Flock 1c-4
121) Flock 1c-5 122) Flock 1c-6 123) Flock 1c-7 124) Flock 1c-8
125) Flock 1c-9 126) Flock 1c-10 127) Flock 1c-11 128) SPOT 7
129) AISat 1 130) CanX-4 131) CanX-5 132) VELOX-I-NSat
133) VELOX-I-PSat 134) OCO-2 135) Gonets-M #7 136) Gonets-M #8
137) Gonets-M #9 138) Meteor-M 2 139) MKA-FKI Relek 140) DX-1
141) SkySat 2 142) UKube 1 143) AISSat 2 144) TDS 1 / TechDemoSat 1
-- Angara 1.2PP 145) O3b FM-8 146) O3b FM-6 147) O3b FM-7
148) O3b FM-3 149) Cygnus Orb-2 150) Orbcomm OG2-9 / Orbcomm FM109 151) Orbcomm OG2-7  / Orbcomm FM107
152) Orbcomm OG2-6 / Orbcomm FM106 153) Orbcomm OG2-11 / Orbcomm FM111 154) Orbcomm OG2-4 / Orbcomm FM104 155) Orbcomm OG2-3 / Orbcomm FM103
156) Foton-M 4 157) Progress M-24M / ISS-56P 158) GSSAP 1 (USA 253) 159) GSSAP 2 (USA 254)
160) ANGELS (USA 255) 161) ATV-5 Georges Lemaître 162) Navstar 67 (USA 256) 163) AsiaSat 8
164) YW-20 / Yaogan 20 165) YW-20A / Yaogan 20 subsat 1 166) YW-20B / Yaogan 20 subsat 2 167) WorldView 3
168) Chasqui 1 169) GF-2 / Gaofen 2 170) BRITE-PL 2 171) Flock 1b-24
172) Flock 1b-23 173) Flock 1b-26 174) Flock 1b-25 175) Flock 1b-15
176) Flock 1b-16 177) Flock 1b-1 178) Flock 1b-2 179) Galileo-FOC FM1
180) Galileo-FOC FM2 181) Flock 1b-8 182) Flock 1b-7 18) LQ / Ling Qiao
184) CX1-04 / Chuangxin 1-04 185) Flock 1b-18 186) Flock 1b-17 187) AsiaSat 6 / Thaicom 7
188) YW-21 / Yaogan 21 189) Tiantuo 2 190) Optus 10 191) MEASAT 3b / Jabiru 2
192) CLIO (USA 257) 193) Dragon CRS-4 194) Soyuz TMA-14M / ISS-40S 195) Luch / Olimp 1
196) SJ-11-07 / Shijian-11-07 197) Himawari-8 198) IRNSS 1C 199) Intelsat IS-30 /DLA-1
200) ARSAT-1 201) YW-22 / Yaogan 22 202) Ekspress-AM-6 203) Chang'e 5-T1
204) Chang'e 5 
Orbital Module
205) 4M / Manfred Memorial Moon Mission 206) SJ-11-08 / Shijian-11-08 207) Cygnus CRS-3
208-
233)
Flock 1d-1 to 26 234) RACE 235) Arkyd 3 236) GOMX 2
237) Progress M 25M / ISS-57P 238) Navstar 68 (USA 258) 239) Meridian 7 240) ASNARO 1 / SASKE
241) Hodoyoshi 1 242) ChubuSat 1 / Kinshachi 1 243) QSAT-EOS 244) Tsubame
245) YW-23 / Yaogan 23 246) YW-24 / Yaogan 24 247) KZ-2 / Kuaizhou II 245) Soyuz TMA-15M / ISS-41S
249) SpinSat 1 250) Glonass-K1 #2 251) Hayabusa2 252) Shin'en 2
253) DESPATCH 254) PROCYON 255) MASCOT 256) Minerva II-1a
257) Minerva II-1b 258) Minerva II-2 259) SCI 260) DCAM-3
261) Target Marker 1 262) Target Marker 2 263) Target Marker 3 264) Target Marker 4
265) Target Marker 5 266) Orion EFT-1 267) DirecTV 14 268) GSat 16
269) ZY-1 04 / Ziyuan-1 04 / CBERS 4 270) Yaogan 25 271) Yaogan 25A / Yaogan 25 Subsatellite 272) Yaogan 25B / Yaogan 25 Subsatellite
273) NROL-35 (USA 259) 274) Yamal 401 -- CARE 275) O3b FM9
276) O3b FM10 277) O3b FM11 278) O3b FM12 279) Kondor-E 2
280) IPM / Angara A5 281) Lotos-S #2 282) Resurs-P 2 283) Yaogan 26
284) Astra 2G 285) FY-2 (08) / Fengyun 2G
Note: in January 2014, Gunter Dirk Krebs lists 186 spacecraft to be launched during 2014. In July, he lists up to 286!
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GSAT-14
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #1 ; 2014-01A ; 7,473rd spacecraft, 39,498th space object..
Type: Communications (Umiti-services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ISRO / Indian Space Research Organization 
Launch: 5 January 2014 at 10h48 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Center's SHAR Second Launch Pad, by a GSLV Mk.2 (D5).
Orbit: Geostationary at 73.9° East longitude.
Mission: GSAT 14 is a 1,982-kg communications satellite which extends Ku-band and C-band services over India.
Note: This launch marks the first successful flight of India"'s Geosynchronous Satellite  This 23rd geostationary satellite for India has an expected lifespan of nearly 12 years,
     Launch Vehicle (GSLV) with a home-develop cryogenic upper stage. The rocket sprung a fuel leak during a countdown on 19 August 2013, forcing Indian officials to scrap the long-delayed test launch of the GSLV with its Indian-built cryogenic upper stage. Two previously GSLV launch failures occured in 2010: first a premature shutdown of the GSLV's Indian cryogenic upper stage in April, then an explosive mishap shortly after liftoff on another mission in December. The GSLV is the centerpiece of India's ambition to become a fully independent space power; without this launcher, India must launch its heaviest satellites on foreign rockets. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; China Daily's 18 Aug 13 ; ISRO's 19 Aug 13, 29 Aug 13, 6 Jan 14 ; Xinhua's 18 Aug 13, 19 Aug 13, 5 Jan 14, 5 Jan 14, 6 Jan 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-001A ; Gunter's GSAT-14 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Thaicom 6 / AfriCom 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #2 ; 2014-02A ; 7,474th spacecraft, 39,500th space object.
Type: Communications (Broadcasting Services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Thaicom Public Company Limited.
Launch: 6 January 2014 at 22h06 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station' LC-40, by a Falcon 9 v1.1.
Orbit: Geostationary at 78.5° East longitude.
Mission: Thaicom 6 is a 3,330-kg communications satellite which carries 18 C-band and 8 Ku-band transponders to provide broadcasters in the Asia-Pacific with improved television quality and additional high-definition channels. The 8 Ku-band active transponders provides services to Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Myanmar. Twelve active C-band transponders provides services via a regional beam to Southeast Asia as six C-band transponders provides services to Africa. The satellite was built by Orbital Sciences Corp. Thaicom said the Thaicom 6 project was a $160 million investment for the company, including the spacecraft, launch services and insurance.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693 ; Spaceflight Now's 2013 Stories, 2014 Stories ; OSC's 6 Jan 14, 7 Jan 14 ; SpaceX's 8 Jan 14 & Press Kit ; NSSDC's 2014-002A ; Gunter's Thaicom 6 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Cygnus Orb-1 (“ISS Gordon Fullerton”)
Spacecraft: The cargocraft is named after Gordon Fullerton, a NASA astronaut who died in August 2013. 
Chronologies: 2014 payload #3 ; 2014-03A ; 7,475th spacecraft, 39,502nd space object.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbital Sciences for NASA
Launch: 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT, from Wallops Flight Facility's LP-0A, by an Antares 120.
Orbit: Initial: 221 km X 259 km x 51.6° 
Docked to the International Space Station
Deorbited: 19 February 2014.
Mission: Cynus Orb-1 (or PCM-1) is a 4,750-kg cargo delivery ship which carries to the International Space Station 1,260 kg of cargo, including 435 kg of science and research equipment, 425 kg of crew supplies, 333 kg of hardware, 48 kg of computer supplies and 22 kg of spacewalk tools. Also on board: 33 small "cubesat" satellites that will be jettisoned from ISS' Kibo laboratory.
     Cygnus made rendezvous with ISS on 12 January 2014. It was capture by the Canararm2 at 11h08 UT and was berthed to the Harmony module. The crew opened up hatches leading into the spacecraft at 17h17 UT. One of the first items transferred into ISS was a colony of ants, an investigation developed to observe the ants' behavior and compare it to how they act in colonies on the ground. Undocking of Cygnus occured on 18 February 2014 at 11h41 UT. The cargocraft was packed with 1,475 kg of trash and unnecessary gear loaded by the space station's six-person crew.  On 19 February 2014, a pair of engine burns lowered the craft's orbit before it fell into the atmosphere East of New Zealand at about 18h20 UT.
Notes: Orb-1 is the first of seven commercial resupply missions planned for 2014 to resupply ISS, three by Orbital's Antares/Cygnus vehicle and four by SpaceX Falcon 9 rockets and Dragon cargo craft. Orbital won a $1.9 billion contract to launch at least eight station resupply flights to deliver about 18,000 kg of cargo and supplies. SpaceX holds a $1.6 billion contract for 12 flights to deliver more than 20 000 kg of equipment. This means that each Cygnus cargo flight is valued at $240 million and that each kilogram carried to ISS costs $190 000. SpaceX’s Dragon flight is valued at $130 million and each kilo carried costs $80,000.
Notes: On 8 January 2014, the launch of Antares was delayed at least one day due to elevated solar radiation following strong solar flares the day before. "Early this morning the Antares launch team decided to scrub today's launch attempt due to an unusually high level of space radiation that exceeded by a considerable margin the constraints imposed on the mission to ensure the rocket's electronic systems are not impacted by a harsh radiation environment," Orbital Sciences said. "The solar flux activity that occurred late yesterday afternoon has had the result of increasing the level of radiation beyond what the Antares engineering team was monitoring earlier in the day."
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 2013 Stories, 2014 Stories ; OSC's Cygnus, 7 Jan 14, 9 Jan 14 ; NASA News Releases ; OSC's 7 Jan 13, 9 Jan 14, 12 Jan 14, 19 Feb 14 ; NSSDC's 2013-003A ; Gunter's Cygnus-PCM ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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TDRS 12
Spacecraft: TDRS L ; TDRS stands for Tracking and Data Relay Satellite.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #4 ; 2014-04A ; 7,476th spacecraft, 39,504th space object.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 24 January 2014 at 2h33 UT, from Cape Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-41, by an Atlas V 401.
Orbit: Geostationary at 150.0° West longitude.
Mission: TDRS 12 is a data-relay communications satellite which is part of the network which provides constant communications to American satellites (civil and military) in low-Earth orbit as well as with the International Space Station.
Notes: TDRS 12 is the second replenishment satellite in the third generation of the TDRS system.  TDRS 1 to 7 were built by TRW and launched between 1983 and 1995 by the Space Shuttle. TDRS 8 to 10 were built using the Hughes HS-601 bus and launched in 2000-2002. TDRS 11, 12 and the forthcoming TDRS M use a high power version of the same bus, the BSS-601HP.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693 ; Spaceflight Now's 2013 Stories, 2014 Stories ; NASA's TDRS, NASA News Releases ; NSSDC's 2014-004A ; Gunter's TDRS 11, 12, 13 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Progress M-22M / ISS-54P
Spacecraft: Progress M (7K-TGM) No. 422
Chronologies: 2014 payload #5 ; 2014-05A ; 7,477th spacecraft, 39,506th space object.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks: 306th Soyuz (7K) spacecraft and 145th Progress.
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 5 February 2014 at 16h24 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1/5, by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Docked to ISS at about 413 km x 419 km x 51.7° 
Deorbited: 18 April 2014.
Mission: Progress M-22M is a resupply cargoship which carries 2,370 kg of fuel and supplies to the International Space Station. It completes a standard 6-hour approach to ISS, docking at 22h22 UT on the Pirs module. Approach, fly-around and station-keeping were performed in the automatic mode. The logistics ship is loaded with 655 kg of propellant, 58 kg of oxygen and 420 kg of water. It also delivers 158 kg of food, 130 kg of medical supplies, 93 kg of items for the Russian crew, 64 kg of payload for crew hygiene and 25 kg of video and photographic material. It also carried a cubesat for later deployment, Chasqui 1, to be ejected manually during a spacewalk later this year. Progress M-22M undocked from the Pirs module on 7 April 2014 at 13h58 UT and remained in orbit for Radar-Progress ionospheric studies until 18 April, when it was deorbited over the Pacific.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694, 696 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; RSC Energia's Photos Reports ; ITAR-TASS' 5 Feb 14, 6 Feb 14, 7 Apr 14 ; NASA's 4 April 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-005A ; Gunter's Progress-M 1M-22M ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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ABS-2
Spacecraft: ABS stands for Asia Broadcast Satellite.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #6 ; 2014-6A ; 7,478th spacecraft, 39,508th space object.
Type: Communications (Direct-to-home Broadcasting)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Asia Broadcast Satellite (Hong Kong)
Launch: 6 February 2014 at 21h30 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECS.
Orbit: Geostationary at 75° East longitude.
Mission: ABS-2 is a 6,330-kg communications satellites equipped with 89 transponders in Ku-band, C-band and Ka-band for direct-to-home television, multimedia and data transmission services across the Eastern Hemisphere, reaching a geographic swath from Europe and Africa, across the Middle East, Russia and India, to Southeast Asia and China.  The craft provides 10 beams, with six dedicated to Ku-band television transmissions throughout the Eastern Hemisphere. C-band beams will focus on Africa and Southeast Asia to boost connectivity there, and a single Ka-band beam to serve commercial and military users over the Middle East and North Africa. Built by Space Systems/Loral, it has a 15-year expected lifespan.
Notes: This mission marks the 250th launch for Arianespace.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Arianespace's 6 Feb 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-006A ; Gunter's ABS 2 (ST 3, Koreasat 8) ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Athena-Fidus
Spacecraft: Athena-Fidus stands for Access on THeatres for European Nations Allied forces - French Italian Dual Use Satellite.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #7 ; 2014-06B ; 7,479th spacecraft, 39,509th space object.
Type: Communications (Military Services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Athena-Fidus
Launch: 6 February 2014 at 21h30 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECS.
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: Athena-Fidus is a 3,080-kg French-Italian communications satellite to serve military and security forces. It complements the Syracuse and Sicral national military communications satellites. The new satellite offers French and Italian governments ultra-secure, jam-resistant communications links. with specific purpose ot providing broadband services beyond the telephone, fax and Intranet capabilities of the Syracuse and Sicral networks. Built by Thales Alenia Space, it has an expected design life exceeding 15 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Arianespace's 6 Feb 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-006B ; Gunter's Athena-Fidus ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Dove 5 / Flock 1-1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #8 ; 1998-67DG (or DH) ; 7,480th spacecraft, 39,513rd space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 11 February 2014 at 6h31 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 9 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 6 / Flock 1-2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #9 ; 1998-67DH (or DJ) ; 7,481st spacecraft, 39,514th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 11 February 2014 at 8h31 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 21 May 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 7 / Flock 1-3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #10 ; 1998-67DJ (or DG) ; 7,482nd spacecraft, 39,512nd space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 11 February 2014 at 12h41 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 15 May 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 8 / Flock 1-4
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #11 ; 1998-67DK ; 7,483rd spacecraft, 39,515th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 11 February 2014 at 12h41 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 18 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 9 / Flock 1-5
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #12 ; 1998-67DL ; 7,484th spacecraft, 39,518th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 12 February 2014 at 8h30 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 2 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 10 / Flock 1-6
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #13 ; 1998-67DM ; 7,485th spacecraft, 39,519th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 12 February 2014 at 8h30 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 15 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 11 / Flock 1-11
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #14 ; 1998-67DN (or DM) ; 7,486th spacecraft, 39,527th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 13 February 2014 at 8h20 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 13 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 16 / Flock 1-12
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #15 ; 1998-67DP (or DT) ; 7,487th spacecraft, 39,528th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 13 February 2014 at 8h20 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed:
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
.
Dove 17 / Flock 1-13
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #16 ; 1998-67DQ (or DU); 7,488th spacecraft, 39,529th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 14 February 2014 at 4h15 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 2 July 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 18 / Flock 1-14
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #17 ; 1998-67DR (or DV) ; 7,489th spacecraft, 39,530th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 14 February 2014 at 4h15 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 20 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693,694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 19 / Flock 1-15
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #18 ; 1998-67DS (or DU) ; 7,490th spacecraft, 39,5th spa31sc object, 39,529th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 14 February 2014 at 11h45 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 21 May 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 20 / Flock 1-16
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #19 ; 1998-67DT (or DX) ; 7,491st spacecraft, 39,532nd space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 14 February 2014 at 11h45 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 20 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
.
Turksat 4A
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #20 ; 2014-07A ; 7,492nd spacecraft, 39,522nd space object.
Type: Communications (Multi-services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Turksat AS (Turkey)
Launch: 14 February 2014 at 21h09 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/24, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 42° East longitude.
Mission: Turksat 4A is a 4,800-kg communications satellite which carries C-band, Ku-band and Ka-band transponders to telecommunication and direct TV broadcasting services in African, the Middle East, Europe and Asia. It is the first of two satellites built by Mitsubishi Electric Corp. The craft has an expected operational life of 15 years but carries enough fuel for 30 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 694 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS's 15 Feb 14 ; ILS' 15 Feb 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-007A ; Gunter's Türksat 4A ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Dove 11 / Flock 1-7
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #21 ; 1998-67DU (or DN) ; 7,493rd spacecraft, 39,520th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 15 February 2014 at 7h00 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 6 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 12 / Flock 1-8
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #22 ; 1998-67DV (or DP) ; 7,494th spacecraft, 39,521st space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 15 February 2014 at 7h00 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed:  25 May 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 13 / Flock 1-9
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #23 ; 1998-67DW (or DQ) ; 7,495th spacecraft, 39,525th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 15 February 2014 at 10h55 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 6 July 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 14 / Flock 1-10
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #24 ; 1998-67DX (or DR); 7,496th spacecraft, 39,526th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 15 February 2014 at 10h55 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 14 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Navstar 65 (USA 248)
Spacecraft: GPS 2F-5 / Navstar SVN-64 / Block IIF SV-5
Chronologies: 2014 payload #25 ; 2014-08A ; 7,497th spacecraft, 39,533rd space object.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 21 February 2014 at 1h59 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-37B, by a Delta-4M+(4,2).
Orbit:
Mission: Navstar 65 is a navigation satellite that joins the constellation of the U.S. Global Positioning System. It provides increased signal power, increased accuracy and anti-jamming capability for GPS users worldwide. The craft replaces Navstar 41, an aging GPS satellite deployed in 1997, wich is over 16 years old and its design life was 7.5 years. GPS constellation has 31 primary satellites and five backups that remain in the network.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 2013 Stories, 2014 tories ; NSSDC's 2014-008A ; Gunter's GPS-2F ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Dove 21 / Flock 1-17
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #26 ; 1998-67DY ; 7,498th spacecraft, 39,555th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 25 February 2014 at 17h00 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 19 May 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693,694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 22 / Flock 1-18
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #27 ; 1998-67DZ ; 7,499th spacecraft, 39,556th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 25 February 2014 at 17h00 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed:
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 25 / Flock 1-21
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #28 ; 1998-67EC (or EA) ; 7,500th spacecraft, 39,557th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 26 February 2014 at 4h20 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 25 May 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693,694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 26 / Flock 1-22
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #29 ; 1998-67ED (or EB) ; 7,501st spacecraft, 39,558th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 26 February 2014 at 4h20 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 5 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
.
Dove 23 / Flock 1-19
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #30 ; 1998-67EA (or EA) ; 7,502nd spacecraft, 39,559th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 26 February 2014 at 7h35 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 3 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
.
Dove 24 / Flock 1-20
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #31 ; 1998-67DX (or ED) ; 7,503rd spacecraft, 39,560th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 26 February 2014 at 7h35 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 9 October 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
.
Dove 27 / Flock 1-23
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #32 ; 1998-67EE ; 7,504th spacecraft, 39,561st space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 27 February 2014 at 1h50 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 10 July 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
.
Dove 28 / Flock 1-24
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #33 ; 1998-67EF ; 7,505th spacecraft, 39,562nd space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 27 February 2014 at 1h50 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 16 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
.
Dove 29 / Flock 1-25
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #34 ; 1998-67EG ; 7,506th spacecraft, 39,563rd space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 27 February 2014 at 7h40 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 24 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
.
Dove 30 / Flock 1-26
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #35 ; 1998-67EH ; 7,507th spacecraft, 39,564th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 27 February 2014 at 7h40 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed:  10 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
.
GPM-CO
Spacecraft: GPM-CO stands for Global Precipitation Measurement - Core Observatory.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #36 ; 2014-09C ; 7,508th spacecraft, 39,874th space object.
Type: Earth/space Sciences
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA / JAXA
Launch: 27 February 2014 at 18h37 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's LP-1, by a H-IIA (202).
Orbit:
Mission: GPM-CO is a 3,850-kg Earth observation satellite which monitored rain and snow precipitations around the globe to better understand climate cycle, improve forecasts of extreme weather events and assist decision makers to better manage water resource. It carries two instruments: the GPM Microwave Imager, provided by NASA, to estimate precipitation intensities from heavy to light rain and snowfall, and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar, developed by JAXA, that used emitted radar pulses to make detailed measurements of three-dimensional rainfall structure. GPM-C provide for the first time frequent unified global observations of all types of precipitation. It improved the capabilities of the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM), a joint NASA-JAXA mission launched in 1997 and still in operation. The Observatory is a joint $1.2 billion mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 2013 Stories, 2014 Stories ; NASA's GPM, NASA News Releases ; JAXA ; NSSDC's 2014-009C ; Gunter's GPM-Core ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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ShindaiSat / Ginrei
Spacecraft: The satellite has been renamed Gennai after the Japanese polymath Hiraga Gennai (1728-1780).
Chronologies: 2014 payload #37 ; 2014-09A ; 7,509th spacecraft, 39,572nd space object.
Type: Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Shinshu Universit (Japan)
Launch: 27 February 2014 at 18h37 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's LP-1, by a H-IIA (202).
Orbit:
Mission: ShindaiSat is a 35-kg experimental visible light communication microsatellite developed at Shinshu University for an on-orbit technology demonstration over a long distance (> 400 km), by using LED light as an optical communications link. The project is educational in nature with student participation on all levels.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 694 ; NSSDC's 2014-009A; Gunter's ShindaiSat (Ginrei) ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
.
ITF-1 / Yui
Spacecraft: IFT stands for Imagine The Future.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #38 ; 2014-09B ; 7,510th spacecraft, 39,573rd space object.
Type: Student (Radioham)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: University of Tsukuba (Japan)
Launch: 27 February 2014 at 18h37 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's LP-1, by a H-IIA (202).
Orbit:
Decayed: 29 June 2014.
Mission: IFT 1 is a 1-kg Cubesat built by students. It features a beacon, which sends telemetry by a Morse Code audio tone on an FM transmitter. It should be possible to receive it using simple equipment such as a handheld transceiver or scanner.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 694 ; NSSDC's 2014-009B ; Gunter's ITF 1 / Yui ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;

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OPUSat / Kosu mozu
Spacecraft: OPUSAT stands for Osaka Prefecture University Satellite.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #39 ; 2014-09D ; 7,511th spacecraft, 39,575th space object.
Type: Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Osaka Prefecture University (Japan)
Launch: 27 February 2014 at 18h37 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's LP-1, by a H-IIA (202).
Orbit:
Decayed: 24 July 2014.
Mission: OPUSat is 1.4-kg nanosatellite to demonstrate advanced hybrid power supply system using Lithium-ion Capacitor (Li-C) and Lithium-ion battery. It also has deployable solar array paddles, and is equipped with a spin stabilization system using magnetic torquers.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 694 ; NSSDC's 2014-009D ; Gunter's OPUSAT ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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 Teikyosat-3
Spacecraft: Also named: Microbial Observation Satellite.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #40 ; 2014-09E ; 7,512ndspacecraft, 39,576th space object.
Type: Biology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Teikyou University (Japan)
Launch: 27 February 2014 at 18h37 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's LP-1, by a H-IIA (202).
Orbit:
Mission: TeikyoSat 3 is a 20-kg life science craft which study the impact of space radiation and the microgravity environment on a mold called Dictyostelium discoideum. The life cycle of this species of soil-living amoeba is relatively short, which allows for timely viewing of all the stages of its life.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 694 ; NSSDC's 2014-009E ; Gunter's TeikyoSat 3 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;

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Invader / Cubesat-OSCAR-77
Spacecraft: INVADER stands for Interactive satellite for Art and Design Experimental Research.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #41 ; 2014-09F ; 7,513rd spacecraft, 39,577th space object.
Type: Student (Art)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Tama Art University (Japan)
Launch: 27 February 2014 at 18h37 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's LP-1, by a H-IIA (202).
Orbit:
Mission: INVADER is a 1.5-kg cubesat, the first mission of the ARTSAT, Art and Satellite Project. With its Lightning Equipment, the satellite changes color according to its temperature data. It also carries a small camera (150 × 150 pixels) for acquiring  Earth image for utilizing in Art Work. a Digi-Talker, which transmits voice data using FM and to transmit sensor data using the Digi-Talker
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 694 ; NSSDC's 2014-009F ; Gunter's INVADER (ARTSAT 1) ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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K-SAT 2 / Hayato 2
Spacecraft: KSAT stands for Kagoshima Satellite.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #42 ; 2014-09G ; 7,514th spacecraft, 39,578th space object.
Type: Student (Earth Observation)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Kagoshima University (Japan)
Launch: 27 February 2014 at 18h37 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's LP-1, by a H-IIA (202).
Orbit:
Decayed: 18 May 2014.
Mission: KSAT 2 is a 1.5-kg cubesat which is a modified reflight of the failed KSAT 1. Mission objectives are to study the forecast of localized downpour and tornado, an original observation method of atmospheric water vapor, and to take Earth images from Space.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 694 ; NSSDC's 2014-009G ; Gunter's KSAT 2 (Hayato 2) ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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STARS-2 / Kukai 2
(STARS-2 Mother & STARS-2 Daughter)
Spacecraft: STARS stands for Space Tethered Autonomous Robotic Satellite. 
Chronologies: 2014 payload #43 ; 2014-09H ; 7,515th spacecraft, 39,579th space object.
Type: Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Kagawa University (Japan)
Launch: 27 February 2014 at 18h37 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's LP-1, by a H-IIA (202).
Orbit:
Decayed: 26 April 2014.
Mission: STARS 2 consists of a ~7-kg dual satellite, a “mother satellite” and a “daughter satellite” connected by a tether. The “mother satellite” (Ku) deploys the tether having the “daughter satellite” (Kai) at its end. “Daughter satellite” has one arm, and the tether is attached at its end. Then attitude control by arm motion using tether tension is possible. Main mission is to take pictures of a satellite during tether deployment.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 694, 696 ; NSSDC's 2014-009H ; Gunter's STARS 1, 2 (Kukai) ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Dove 31 / Flock 1-27
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #44 ; 1998-67EJ ; 7,516th spacecraft, 39,565th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 28 February 2014 at 4h20 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 3 May 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Dove 32 / Flock 1-28
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #45 ; 1998-67EK ; 7,517th spacecraft, 39,566th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 28 February 2014 at 4h20 UT.
Orbit: ~ 400 km circular orbit X 51.6°
Decayed: 3 June 2014.
Mission: This 5-kg Dove 3U Cubesat is one of the 28 Earth remote sensing satellites launched as part Planet Labs’ first Flock constellation - the largest fleet of Earth observation satellites ever launched. Each satellite is about the size of a loaf of bread. They act “like a line scanner for the planet” as they return imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 meters. These satellites monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. Planet Labs says the satellites will allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface at an unprecedented frequency. Because they were deployed from the International Space Station, Flock 1 is limited to observing Earth between 52 degrees North and South of the equator. Planet Labs plans to launch 100 satellites in the next year [2014-2015].
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14, 8 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 ; Planet Labs' Flock 1 ; Gunter's Flock-1 1 to 28 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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SkyCube
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #46 ; 1998-67EL ; 7,518th spacecraft, 39,567th space object.
Type: Radio-Amateur
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Southern Stars Group LLC (USA)
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 28 February 2014 at 7h30 UT.
Orbit: 8 November 2014.
Mission: SkyCube is a crowdfunded 2-kg cubesat which tweet messages submitted by its investors and to take pictures of places they have requested. And in the final weeks of its life, it will inflate a silver balloon so they can see it as it sails overhead. The craft features four cameras, deployable solar arrays and an inflatable 3-meter reflective balloon, making it very visible and increasing atmospheric drag to de-orbit it in a few weeks.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14 ; Southern Star's SkyCube ; Gunter's SkyCube ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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LitSat 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #47 ; 1998-67EM ; 7,519th spacecraft, 39,568th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Lithuanian Space Federation
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 28 February 2014 at 7h30 UT.
Orbit:
Decayed: 22 May 2014.
Mission: LitSat 1 is a 1-kg cubesat which use low-cost open-source software and hardware to control a camera and a GPS receiver. It also carries a linear transponder and a packet radio transceiver. Together with LituanicaSAT 1, it is one of the first two Lithuanian satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14 ; Gunter's LitSat 1 CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ; ;
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LituanicaSAT 1
Spacecraft: The satellite is named after an airplane used for a historic 1933 transatlantic flight.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #48 ; 1998-67EN ; 7,520th spacecraft, 39,569th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Kaunas University of Technology, Lithuania
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 28 February 2014 at 7h30 UT.
Orbit:
Decayed: 28 July 2014.
Mission: LituanicaSAT 1 is a 1-kg cubesat which carries a camera, GPS receiver and voice transponde. Together with LitSat 1, it is one of the first two Lithuanian satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694;Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14 ; Gunter's LituanicaSAT 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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ArduSat 2 / Arduino Satellite 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #49 ; 1998-67EP ; 7,521st spacecraft, 39,570th space object.
Type: Technology (Student)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NanoSatisf Inc.
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 28 February 2014 at 7h30 UT.
Orbit:
Decayed: 23 May 2014.
Mission: ArduSat 2 is a 2-kg cubesat which provide a platform on which students and DIY space enthusiasts may design and run their own space-based Arduino experiments. It is being built as a crowd-funded project by NanoSatisfi Inc. It is an improved version of the single unit ArduSat 1 satellite.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14 ; Gunter's ArduSat 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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UAPSat 1
Spacecraft: UAPSat stands for Universidad Alas Peruanas Satellite.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #50 ; 1998-67EQ ; 7,522nd spacecraft, 39,571st space object.
Type:
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Institute for Radio Astronomy of the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú (INRAS-PUCP), Peru.
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-1 on 9 January 2014 at 18h07 UT and deployed from ISS on 28 February 2014 at 7h30 UT.
Orbit:
Decayed: 1 July 2014
Mission: UAPSat 1 is a 1-kg cubesat which carries a minicomputer, radio transmitters and receivers and magnets to align the satellite with Earth's magnetic field. It transmits telemetry information of the spacecraft.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 693, 694 ; Spaceflight Now's 9 Jan 14 ; Universidad Alas Peruanas's UAPSatGunter's UAPSat 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Ekspress-AT 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #51 ; 2014-10A ; 7,523rd spacecraft, 39,612nd space object.
Type: Communications (Broadcast Services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Satellite Communications Co.
Launch: 15 March 2014 at 23h08 UT, from Baykonor Cosmodrome's LC-81/24, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 56° East longitude.
Mission: Express-AT 1 is a 1,672-kg communications satellite fitted with 32 Ku-band transponders to broadcast television signals and data networking services across Eastern Europe and Russia. It replaces capacity currently offered by the DirecTV 1R and Bonum 1 satellites, which are at the end of their design lives.  Eutelsat has claimed 19 Ku-band transponders on Express AT1 to expand digital television offerings in Siberia, primarily for the Tricolor TV and NTV Plus networks. The satellite was manufactured by ISS Reshetnev and based on variants of the Express 1000 platform. Thales Alenia Space of France built the communications payloads. It has a 15-year operating lifespan .
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 695 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS Feb 14, 12 Mar 14, 15 Mar 14, 16 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14, 17 Apr 14, 22 April 14 ; Eutelsat's 17 Mar 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-010A ; Gunter's Ekspress-AT 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Ekspress-AT 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #52 ; 2014-10B ; 7,524th spacecraft, 39,613rd
space object.
Type: Communications (Broadcast Services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Satellite Communications Co.
Launch: 15 March 2014 at 23h08 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/24, by a Proton-M/Briz-M .
Orbit: Geostationary at 140° East longitude
Mission: Express-AT 2 is a 1,326-kg communications satellite fitted with 16 Ku-band transponders to cover Russia's Far East. Eutelsat is also leasing capacity on the cratt. The satellite was manufactured by the Reshetnev Information Satellite Systems, in cooperation with Alenia Space, for Space Communications under the Russian Federal Space Programme for 2006-2015. It is based on variants of the Express 1000 platform and Thales Alenia built the communications payloads. The craft has a 15-year expected lifespan.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 695 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS 3 Feb 14, 12 Mar 14, 15 Mar 14, 16 Mar 14, 17 Mar 14 , 17 Apr 14 ; Eutelsat's 17 Mar 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-010B ; Gunter's Ekspress-AT 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Astra 5B
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #53 ; 2014-11B; 7,525th spacecraft, 39,617th space object.
Type: Communicaions (Direct-to-home services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: SES 
Launch: 22 March 2014 at 22h04 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 31.5° East longitude.
Mission: Astra 5B is a 5,724-kg communications satellite with 40 Ku-band and 6 Ka-bandtransponders for direct-to-home and direct-to-cable television services over Eastern Europe, Russia and neighboring markets. It also hosted a L-band navigation payload for the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, which augments GPS navigation signals over Europe for specialty users such as the aviation and surveying industries. Built by Airbus Defence and Space, based on the Airbus Eurostar E3000 satellite bus, it has a planned 15-year operational mission. Astra 5B will eventually replace the aging Astra 1G
Notes: Some Ariane statistics: 217th Ariane rocket launch since 1979; 73rd Ariane 5 launch since 1996; 43rd Ariane 5 ECA launch since 2002 and 62nd Ariane 5 launch targeting GTO;
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 695 ; Spaceflight Now's 2013 Stories, 2014 Stories ; Arianespace's Press Kit, 22 Mar 14 ; SES' 22 Mar 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-011B ; Gunter's Astra 2E, 2F, 2G, 5B . CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Amazonas 4A
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #54 ; 2014-11A ; 7,526th spacecraft, 39,616th space object.
Type: Communications (Multi-services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Hispasat (Spain)
Launch: 22 March 2014 at 22h04 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 61° West longitude.
Mission: Amazonas 4A is a 2,938-kg communications satellite equipped with 24 Ku-band transponders to cover South America for broadcast television, corporate mobile and fixed telephone networks, and remote training and telemedicine services, as well as voice, Internet and data transmission services. One of the satellite's first jobs will be helping link global viewers with the 2014 World Cup football matches in Brazil. The spacecraft is manufactured by Orbital Science Corp., based on the GEOStar 2 platform, and is designed to function for at least 15 years. According to Hispasat, the project entails an investment of more than 140 million Euros.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 695 ; Spaceflight Now's 2013 Stories, 2014 Stories ; Arianespace's Press Kit, 22 Mar 14 ; Hispasat's 13 Nov 13, 2 Feb 14, 5 Feb 13, 23 Mar 13, 23 Mar 14 ; OSC's 20 'Mar 13, 24 Mar 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-011A ; Gunter's Amazonas 4A. CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Glonass M #53
Spacecraft: Glonass-M #53 or #54 / Uragan-M #42 or #754
Glonass stands for GLobal NAvigation Satellite System.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #55 ; 2014-12A ; 7,527th spacecraft, 39,620th space object.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russia Ministry of Defense
Launch: 23 March 2014 at 22h54 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrone's LC-43/4, by a Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat-M.
Orbit: 19,128 km x 19,153 km x 64.8°
Mission: This Glonass-M is a 1,415-kg navigation satellite which broadcasts positioning and timing signals to Russian military forces and civilian users worldwide. It was manufactured by ISS Reshetnev and is designed for a seven-year operational life. As of 24 March 2014, the Glonass constellation includes 24 functioning satellites with three additional satellites in reserve and one undergoing flight tests. The Glonass constellation is scattered among three orbital planes, each designed to contain eight satellites to maximize coverage around the world. Russia says it needs 24 operational satellites to maintain worldwide service.
Notes: As Jonathan McDowell ramarks: “The Glonass-M satellite is reported as Kosmos 2491 and Kosmos 2494 in different official Russian sources, suggesting a degree of administrative confusion within the Russian establishment. The Kosmos series nomenclature was introduced in 1962 to obfuscate the missions of Soviet military satellites; analogous approaches were taken by the US. I have had the impression for the past few years that the system is breaking down, with bulletins from organs such as TASS and Novosti sometimes issuing inconsistent names for the same satellite - probably reflecting a bureaucratic change which has decentralized control of such press releases in some way.”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 695, 697 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 24 Mar 14, 24 Mar 14, 24 Mar 14, 22 Apr 14 ; RSVN's 24 Mar 14 ; Xinhua's 14 Apr 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-012A ; Gunter's Kosmos 2494 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Soyuz TMA-12M / ISS-38S
Spacecraft: Soyuz 11F732A47 No. 712
Chronologies: 2014 payload #56 ; 2014-13A ; 7,528th spacecraft, 39,622nd space object.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks: 307th Soyuz (7K) spacecraft, 144th Soyuz spaceship (120th manned).
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 25 March 2014 at 21h17 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz-FG.
Orbit: Docked to the International Space Station.
Recovered: 11 September 2014.
Mission: Soyuz TMA-12M is a crew transport spaceship which carriied ISS Expedition 39/40 crew to the International Space Station (Alexander Skvortsov, Oleg Artemyev and Steven Swanson). The spaceship was scheduled to dock with ISS six hours after its launch but that maneuver was delayed for two days beacuse of orbital firings problems. Docking finally occured on the Poisk module, with six minutes in advance, on 27 March 2014 at 23h53 UT.
     Soyuz TMA-12M undocked from the Poisk module on 10 September 2014 at 23h01 UT and landed in Kazakhstan on 11 September at 2h23 UT.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 695, 702 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories, ISS Expedition 39 & ISS Expediion 40 ; NASA ISS Expedition 40, NASA News Releases ; RSC Energia's Photos Reports ; itAR-TASS' 13 Mar 14, 23 Mar 14, 25 Mar 14, 26 Mar 14, 26 Mar 14, 26 Mar 14, 26 Mar 14, 28 Mar 14, 28 Mar 14, 9 Sep 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-013A ; Gunter's Soyuz TMA-12M ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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SJ-11-06 / Shijian 11-06
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #57 ; 2014-14A ; 7,529th spacecraft, 39,624th space object.
Type: Missile Early warning
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Chinese People's Liberation Army
Launch: 31 March 2014 at 2h58 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2C.
Orbit: 687 km x 704 km x 98.3°
Mission: According to Chinese media, Shijian-11-06 is an “experimental satellite used to conduct scientific experiments in space” developed by China Spacesat Co. under the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation. But the SJ-11 series is generally considered to monitor missile and rockets launches. The Shi Jian 11 constellation is rumoured to carry infrared sensors of some kind.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 696 ; Spaceflight Now's Story ; Xinhua's 31 Mar 14, 31 Mar 14 ; China Daily's 31 Mar 14 ; ITAS-TASS' 31 Mar 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-014A ; Gunter's SJ 11 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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DMSP-5D3 F-19 / DMSP 19 (USA 249)
Spacecraft: DMSP F19 stands for Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Flight 19.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #58 ; 2014-15A ; 7,530th spacecraft, 39,630th space object.
Type: Meteorology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 3 April 2014 at 14h46 UT, from Vandenberg Air Force Base' SLC-3E, by an Atlas V 401.
Orbit: Circular at 850 km, Sun-synchronous orbit.
Mission: DMSP 5D3 F-19 a 1,225-kg military weather satellite outfitted with seven sensors to provide visible and infrared cloud pictures, measure precipitation, surface temperatures and soil moisture, and collect space weather data. The craft is a A $518 million Lockheed Martin-built satellite which could provide weather data as late as 2020. DMSP 19 is the fifth satellite of its particular breed and is part of Lockheed Martin's legacy that has produced nearly 50 satellites throughout the program's 52-year history. It’s been reported that the DMSP program is the longest running satellite production program in the world.
Notes: This DMSP meteosat was supposed to have flown years ago but previous satellites have lasted significantly longer than anyone projected. It was built in the mid-1990s and was turned over to the U.S. Air Force in 1998 and then put into long-term storage. “I've been in this business a while and this is a rare and blessed problem to have in that the satellites (in space) have continued capabilities significantly longer than originally designed,” reports Lt. Col. James Bodnar, 4th Space Launch Squadron commander at Vandenberg AFB. “I think we need to highlight the reason behind that, he added, and that's been the fantastic longevity of each of the satellites that have been launched over the precious years.”  One satellite, for instance, was launched in 1995 and remains alive today. 
     This satellite is the 19th of the Block 5D subseries to be launched, and as such has the flight name Block 5D-3 F-19. It is also the 53rd DMSP satellite produced. DMSP 50 (Block 5D-3 S-16) will be the final launch, to be designated F-20. The last-produced, DMSP 54 (Block 5D-3 S-20) was launched as F-16 in 2003.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 696 ; Spaceflight Now's Story ; NSSDC's 2014-015A ; Gunter's DMSP-5D3 F19 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
Sentinel 1A
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #59 ; 2014-16A ; 7,531st spacecraft, 39,634th space object.
Type: Earth Observation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: European Commission and the European Space Agency (ESA)
Launch: 4 April 2014 at 21h02 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELS, by a Soyuz-2.1a/Fregat-M (ST-A, VS07).
Orbit: 684 km x 689 km x 98.2° 
Mission: Sentinel 1A is a 2,157-kg Earth observation satellite which carries a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to observe Earth’s surface by all-weather conditions and by days as well as by night.  Its mission include maritime surveillance and monitoring of sea ice, oil spills, landslides and floods as well as natural disasters. The spacecraft was developed by Thales Alenia Space with Airbus Defence and Space responsible for the C-SAR synthetic aperture radar payload. It is the first spacecraft of the Copernicus program which will create an European satellite network to collect and evaluate environmental data for civil safety and humanitarian purposes. Copernicus is one of two flagship space programs managed by the European Commission, along with the Galileo navigation satellite system. The seven Sentinel will cover the entire spectrum of Earth monitoring: Sentinel-1 is carrying radar, Sentinel-2 will carry optico-electronic equipment, Sentinel-3 will have apparatus for the monitoring of oceans, Sentinel-4 and 5 will carry instruments to monitor the atmosphere and acquisition of data for weather forecasts.
      On 5 April 2014, Sentinel 1 made a maneuver to avoid a very close pass by NASA's defunct ACRIMSAT satellite. Debris avoidance burns are moderately normal, but doing one during spacecraft checkout in the first days after launch is not, and required a major replanning effort.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 696 ; Spaceflight Now's Story ; Arianespace's 3 Apr 14 ; ITAR-TASS' 4 Apr 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-016A ; Gunter's Sentinal 1A ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
IRNSS 1B
Spacecraft: IRNSS stands for Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #60 ; 2014-17A ; 7,532nd spacecraft, 39,635th space object.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ISRO / Indian Space Research Organization
Launch: 4 April 2014 at 11h44 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Center's SHAR's First Launch Pad, by a PSLV-XL.
Orbit: Geosstationary at 55° East longitude, inclined at 29° over the Equator.
Mission: IRNSS 1B is a 1,432-kg navigation satellite, the second of the seven satellites constituting the space segment of the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System. It carries L-band and S-band navigation payloads and a rubidium atomic clock to keep time. A C-band transponder and laser reflectors will help engineers determine the distance to the satellite in orbit, a requirement for precise navigation services.  The spacecraft has a 10-year lifetime and joins IRNSS-1A launched in July 2013. The IRNSS is an independent regional navigation satellite system designed to provide position information in the Indian region and 1,500 km around the Indian mainland. IRNSS would provide two types of services: Standard Positioning Services (SPS), provided to all users, and Restricted Services (RS), provided only to authorised users. IRNSS services will be freely available to the public, but some capabilities will be restricted to government users. The independent navigation service will aid marine traffic, emergency response officials, vehicle tracking applications, mobile communications, mapping, and civilian drivers. Two more satellites of this constellation are planned to be launched in the second half of 2014. [Only IRNSS 1C was launched.] The entire IRNSS constellation is planned to be completed by 2015-16.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 696 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ISRO's 4 Apr 14 ; Xinhua's 4 Apr 14, 4 Apr 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-017A ; Gunter's IRNSS 1B ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Progress M-23M / ISS-55P
Spacecraft: Progress 7K-TGM No. 427
Chronologies: 2014 payload #61 ; 2014-18A ; 7,533rd spacecraft, 39,648th space object.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks: 308th Soyuz (7K) spacecraft and 146th Progress.
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 9 April 2014 at 15h26 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: Docked to the International Space Station
Deorbited: 31 July 2014.
Mission: Progress M-23M is a 7,250-kg cargo spacecraft which delivers 2.5 tonnes of cargo to the International Space Station for ISS and crew life suppor. The craft is packed with more than 770 kg of propellant, 420 kg of water, 22 kg of oxygen and more than 1,400 kg of dry cargo comprised of spare parts, scientific experiments, food and other items for the space station's six-man crew. Docking with the Pirs module occurred on 9 April 2014 at 21h14 UT.
     Progress M-23M undocked from ISS on 21 July 2014 at 21h44 UT. From July 26 to 31, it was used in the Radar-Progress experiment, which assessed the density, size and reflectivity of the ionosphere environment around the spacecraft - caused by engine burns the vehicle makes. The experiment is being conducted on several Progress missions from 2010 through 2014. The spacecraft was sunk into the Pacific.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 696 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; RSC Energia's Photos Reports ; ITAR-TASS' 7 Apr 14, 9 Apr 14, 22 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-018A ; NASA's 4 April 14 ; Gunter's Progress-M 1M-23M ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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'Ofeq 10 / TecSAR-3
Spacecraft: Ofeq (or Ofek) means "horizon" in Hebrew.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #62 ; 2014-19A ; 7,534th spacecraft, 39,650th space object.
Type: Surveillance (Radar)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Israeli Defense Ministry
Launch: 9 April 2014 at 19h06 UT, from Palmachim, by a Shaviyt.
Orbit: 384 km x 609 km x 141.0°
Mission: ‘Ofeq 10 (or ‘Ofek 10) is a 330-kg military reconnaissance satellite which carries a SAR (Synthetic aperture radar) for improved high-resolution photographic capabilities. It is reported that the craft is able to distinguish objects 50-cm in size and can take pictures under various lighting and weather conditions. It Is meant to improve Israel's intelligence capabilities and allow the defense establishment to better deal with threats both close and far, all hours of the day and in all weather conditions. “We continue to increase the vast qualitative and technological advantage over our neighbors.” reports Defense Minister Moshe Ya'alo, ‘Ofeq 10 is the seventh Israeli satellite currently in orbit. It is Israel's second radar satellite, after Ofeq 8, or TECSAR 1, launched by an Indian rocket in 2008. All other ‘Ofeq satellites have carried optical cameras, the previous one, Ofek 9 was launched in June 2010. ‘Ofeq 10’s launch was visible throughout much of Israel’s center, as much of air and sea traffic in the area was temporarily halted in order to facilitate the launch.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 696 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Haaretz's 10 Apr 14 ; Jerusalem Post's 9 Apr 14 ; Jerusalem Times's 9 Apr 14 ; Xinhua's 10 Apr 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-019A ; Gunter's Ofeq 8, 10 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
NROL-67 (USA 250)
Spacecraft: ORION 9?
Chronologies: 2014 payload #63 ; 2014-20A ; 7,535th spacecraft, 39,652nd space object.
Type: Signal Intelligence?
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NRO / U.S. National Reconnaissance Office
Launch: 10 April 2014 at 17h45 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-41, by an Atlas V 541.
Orbit: Likely Geosycnronous orbit
Mission: The payload is suspected to be a large NRO signals intelligence satellite.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 696 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-020A ; Gunter's NROL-67 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Egyptsat 2
Spacecraft: 559GK No. 1
Chronologies: 2014 payload #64 ; 2014-21A ; 7,536th spacecraft, 39,678th space object.
Type: Surveillance?
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Egypt's National Authority for Remote Sensing and Space Science
Launch: 16 April 2014 at 16h20 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-U.
Orbit: 435 km x 703 km x 51.6°
Mission: EgypSat 2 is a 1,050-kg satellite which reportedly carries a 1-meter resolution imager.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 696 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 16 Apr 14, 16 Apr 14 ; Xinhua's 14 Apr 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-021A ; Gunter's Eguptsat 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Dragon CRS-3 / SpaceX-3 
Spacecraft: CRS stands for Commercial Resupply Services.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #65 ; 2014-22A ; 7,537th spacecraft, 39,680th space object.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: SpaceX for NASA
Launch: 18 April 2014 at 19h25 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-40, by a Falcon-9 v1.1.
Orbit: Docked to the International Space Station.
Recovered: 18 May 2014.
Mission: Dragon CRS-3, also designated SpaceX-3, is a 10-ton automated cargo spaceship that delivers 2.3 tons of equipment to the International Space Station under contract with NASA, including 715 kg of science and research gear, 475 kg of crew provisions, 204 kg of vehicle hardware and 123 kg of spacewalk tools. Cargoes includes a new spacesuit, spare parts and science equipment, a garden to demonstrate vegetable growth in microgravity, and a set of high-tech legs for Robonaut 2, which will provide the humanoid robot torso already aboard the station the mobility it needs to help with regular and repetitive tasks inside the space station. 
     The Dragon spacecraft sports several upgrades over its predecessors, nearly quadrupling the ship's capacity for powered cargo. The modifications include additional freezers for biological samples and redesigned cargo racks to accommodate additional payloads. The mission is also taking up research experiments in the Dragon's unpressurized trunk for the first time. The passengers include a NASA optical communications terminal (OPALS) to demonstrate high data-rate links between the space station and the ground, along with a high-definition camera suite (HDEV) to collect videos of Earth to be installed on the ISS with the help of Dextre robot-arm. 
     Total mass of Dragon CRS-3 at orbit insertion may be around 10,000 kg, larger than earlier missions, but this is speculative since SpaceX do not released mass information. This is the third commercial ISS resupply flight carried out by SpaceX under a $1.6 billion contract with NASA calling for at least 12 cargo missions to deliver some 20 tons of equipment and supplies.
     On its way to the ISS, the Falcon launcher jettisoned five small research satellites known as cubesats and that are to perform a variety of technology demonstrations. The small satellites are part of NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellite, or ElaNa, mission, and involved more than 120 students in their design, development and construction. 
     Some 40 hours after launch, Dragon arrived in the vicinity of the Station and was grapple by the Canadarm2 on 20 April 2014 at 11h14 UT. The arm then berthed the cargo craft on the Harmony module port at 14h02 and the process was completed at 14h06. The ISS arm and the SPDM Dextre manipulator were later used to remove two pieces of cargo from the unpressurized Dragon trunk: HDEV was installed on Columbus on 30 April and OPALS on Express Logistics Carrier 1 on the P3 truss segment on 7 May. Dragon CRS-3 remained attached until 18 May. It was then released at 13h26 UT and splashed down in the Pacific Ocean, off the coast of Baja California, at 19h05 UT. 
     As the only space station resupply spacecraft designed to return to Earth intact, Dragon carries down 1,616 kg of cargo, including science samples from human research, biology and biotechnology studies, physical science investigations as well as crew supplies, vehicle hardware and educational materials. In particular, a spacesuit in need of repair was strapped inside the cargo craft, along with water samples NASA says it needs to complete an investigation into why an astronaut's helmet filled with water during a spacewalk in 2013.
Notes: This was the first flight of a Falcon 9 with experimental landing legs on the first stage. Stage 1 reignited during descent after reaching probably around 120 km, and touched down vertically on the ocean after demonstrating that it could maintain its orientation during the return from space.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 696, 697, 698 ; Spaceflight Now's 13 Nov 13, 2014 Stories ; SpaceX's 11 Mar 14 ; NASA News Releases ; NSSDC's 2014-022A ; Gunter's Dragon CRS-3 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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SporeSat
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #66 ; 2014-22B ; 7,538th spacecraft, 39,681st space object.
Type: Biology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA, the Department of Agricultural and Purdue University.
Launch: 18 April 2014 at 19h25 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-40, by a Falcon-9 v1.1.
Orbit:
Decayed: 4 June 2014.
Mission: SporeSat is a 5.5-kg nanosatellite that conducts scientific experiments to gain a deeper knowledge of the mechanisms of plant cell gravity sensing. Experiments are investigating the effect of gravity on the reproductive spores of the fern, Ceratopteris richardii. The experiment measures the effect of different artificial gravity levels on calcium concentrations. The spacecraft measure 35 centimetres long 10 cm wide by 10 cm tall. It utilizes flight-proven technologies demonstrated on prior Ames nanosatellite missions such as PharmaSat and O/OREOS. In addition, the SporeSatscience payload serves as a technology platform to evaluate new microsensor technologies for enabling future fundamental biology missions. The project was developed through a partnership between NASA’s Ames Research Center, the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at Purdue University.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 696 ; NASA's 18 Apr 14 : NSSDC's 2014-022B ; Gunter's SporeSat ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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TSat / TestSat-Lite
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #67 ; 2014-22C ; 7,539th spacecraft, 39,682nd space object.
Type:
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Taylor University
Launch: 18 April 2014 at 19h25 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-40, by a Falcon-9 v1.1.
Orbit:
Decayed: 28 May 2014.
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 696 ; NSSDC's 2014-022C ; Gunter's TSAT (TestSat-Lite) ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
All-Star
Spacecraft: ALL-STAR/THEIA
Chronologies: 2014 payload #68 ; 2014-22D ; 7,540th spacecraft, 39,686rd space object.
Type:
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Colorado Space Grant consortium
Launch: 18 April 2014 at 19h25 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-40, by a Falcon-9 v1.1.
Orbit:
Decayed: 26 May 2014.
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 696 ; NSSDC's 2014-022E ; Gunter's ALL-STAR/THEIA ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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PhoneSat-2.5
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #69 ; 2014-22E ; 7,541st spacecraft, 39,684th space object.
Type:
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA's Ameres Research Center
Launch: 18 April 2014 at 19h25 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-40, by a Falcon-9 v1.1.
Orbit:
Decayed: 15 May 2014.
Mission: PhoneSat 2.5, is the third in a series of cubesat missions designed to use commercially available smartphone technology as part of a low-cost development effort to provide basic spacecraft capabilities.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 696 ;  NASA's 18 Apr 14 : NSSDC's 2014-022D ; Gunter's PhoneSat 2.5 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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KickSat
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #70 ; 2014-22F ; 7,542nd spacecraft, 39,685th space object.
Type:
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Cornell University's Space Systems Design Stuido
Launch: 18 April 2014 at 19h25 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-40, by a Falcon-9 v1.1.
Orbit:
Decayed: 14 May 2014.
Mission: KickSat has a mass of 2.68 kg of which 0.52 kg will be ejected in the form of 104 tiny 5-gram 'Sprites', circuit boards which will act as independent satellites with small transmitters able to send a simple message to ground stations. A timer problem on Kicksat resets the deployment of the Sprite subsatellites to May 16 but, unfortunately, the satellite reentered and burned in Earth’s atmosphere on 14 May 2014.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 696, 697 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-022F ; Gunter's KickSat 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Luch 5V
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #71 ; 2014-23A ; 7,543rd spacecraft, 39,727th space object.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 28 April 2014 at 4h25 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/24, by a Proton-M Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: Luch-5V is a communications data relay satellites. It is the third in a series of four satellites designed for the reception of information at flight phases out of reach from the Russian territory and its real-time relay to Russian ground-based stations.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 697 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 8 Apr 14, 23 Apr 14, 28 Apr 14 ; Xinhua's 28 Apr 14, 28 Apr 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-023A ; Gunter's Luch 5V ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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KazSat 3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #72 ; 2014-23B ; 7,544th spacecraft, 39,728th space object.
Type: Communications (Multi-services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Kazahstan
Launch: 28 April 2014 at 4h25 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/24, by a Proton-M Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission: KazSat-3 is a communications satellite designed to provide various services in Kazakhstan.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 697 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 8 Apr 14, 23 Apr 14, 28 Apr 14 ; Xinhua's 28 Apr 14, 28 Apr 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-023B ; Gunter's KazSat 3 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
KazEOSat 1 / DZZ-HR
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #73 ; 2014-24A ; 7,545th spacecraft, 39,731st space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Kazahastan
Launch: 30 April 2014 at 1h35 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELV, by a Vega.
Orbit: 737 km x 741 km x 98.6°
Mission: KazEOSat-1 is an Earth-remote sensing satellite with a 1-meter resolution. It was built by Airbus Defense and Space and is based on the Astrosat bus.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 697 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Arianespace's 29 Apr 14 ; ITAR-TASS' 30 Apr 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-024A ; Gunter's KazEOSAT 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Kobalt-M #9
Spacecraft: Yantar-4K2M #9, Kobalt-M9 (11F695M S/n 564
Chronologies: 2014 payload #74 ; 2014-25A ; 7,546th spacecraft, 39,732nd space object.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 6 May 2014 at 13h50 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/4, by a Soyuz 2.1a.
Orbit: Initial: 176 km x 285 km x 81.4° x 8 9.11 min.
Initial: 176 km x 284 km x 81.4°
17 May 2014: 207 km x 248 km x 81.4°
Recovered: 2 September 2014.
Mission: “The satellite that was successfully delivered to orbit was reportedly designated Cosmos-2495. It is believed to be an optical reconnaissance satellite of the Kobalt-M type. There is some uncertainty about the Cosmos designation. It appears that the satellite would be designated Cosmos-2492 - following the March 2014 launch of a Glonass-M that was believed to be kosmos-2491. However, in the official statement it was named kosmos 2495. Furthermore, sources at Novosti Kosmonavtiki reported that the Glonass-M was designated Kosmos 2494 (even though it is listed as 2491 in the official Glonass bulletin). However, it's 2494 in another official Glonass bulletin.” (RSNF))
      This spacecraft landed on 2 September 2014 at around 18h28 UT, after 119 days in space. However, it appears that something went wrong. Reentering debris overhead was observed by people in Kazakhstan at around 18h14 UT, exactly the expected time for the service module entry. In addition, large amounts of reentering debris were observed northbound over Colorado and Wyoming on 2 September at about 4h30 UT.  It is thus possible that Kosmos 2492 landing capsule landed successfully but that its service module bounced off the atmosphere and remained in a very low orbit for 7 further revolutions before finally succumbing over U.S. territory. (See JSR 702.) 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 697, 701, 702, 703, 705; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 4 May 14, 5 May 14, 6 May 14, 9 Sep 14, 12 Sep 14 ; RNSF's 6 May 14 : Spaceflight101's 9 Sep 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-025A ; Gunter's Yantar-4K2m ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Ekspress-AM 4R
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #75 ; 2014 1st failure ; 7,547th spacecraft.
Type: Communications (Multi-services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 15 May 2014 at 21h42 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-200/39, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: N/a
Destroyed: 15 May 2014.
Mission: Express-AM 4R was a 5,755-kg communications satellite for Russian domestic services. It was launch to replace Ekspress AM-4 that was lost in 2011 in another Proton failure. Unfortunately, this AM 4R failed to reach orbit and burned up in the atmosphere. The craft was designed to provide TV and radio broadcasting, multimedia and telephony services as well as for communications services for presidential and government over all Russian territory. It was key ot Russia’s plans to switch over to digital television. Express-AM4R was built by Europe’s EADS Astrium for Russia's Space Communication Company (RSCC) and is similar to Ekspress AM-4, which was put into an unplanned orbit in August 2011.
     Early reports said the problem arose with the third stage of the Proton-M booster, about nine minutes after launch, at an altitude of 161 km. Third stage engine failed and an emergency cutout of the propulsion unit occurred between the separation of the second and third stages. "Contact with the carrier rocket was lost in the 540th second after liftoff," an official said, adding: "It is known that the nose cone did not separate from the rocket". It was later reported that the launch failure was caused by “malfunction of the steering engine unit of the third stage of the Proton-M.”
     Early after the accident, Roscosmos chief Oleg Ostapenko told ITAR-TASS: "According to our preliminary information, nothing has reached Earth."  Apparently, the booster and its satellite burned up in the atmosphere over the Pacific. But Chinese authorities have identified objects that fell into northeast China's Heilongjiang Province as parts of the carrier rocket or a satellite. The province's city of Tsitsihar reported several unidentified objects which appeared to have fallen from the sky on the day of the Proton launch.
     The direct financial losses from the failed launch totals some $278 million: the satellite cost some $207 million, and the rocket launch cost some $71 million.  The satellite was insured for $224 million. RSCC said another three Express series satellites - AM6, AM7 and AM8 - are due to be launched in the rest of 2014. As regards a replacement for the burned-out AM4R, a duplicate will take about three years to manufacture.
Notes: ITAR-TASS reports: In the past five years, there have been eight cases when Russian carrier rockets’ launches failed. Upper stage malfunctions were named as reasons for the failures. 
     The previous failure of a Proton-M rocket occurred in July 2013. It resulted in the loss of three Glonass navigation satellites. Before that, similar accidents happened in December 2010, in August 2011 and in August 2012.
      Failures also haunted the launches of other Russian carrier rockets: Rokot with a geodesy satellite in February 2011 and Soyuz-U, which failed to orbit a Progress spacecraft carrying a cargo for the International Space Station in August 2011.
    In November 2011, the Russian-Ukrainian Zenit-2SB rocket carrying the Fobos-Grunt space probe failed to reach the trajectory for flight to Mars. The launch of a similar rocket carrying US telecommunications satellite Intelsat failed in February 2013.
     The crash of the Proton was due to a failed bearing in the third stage’s steering engine’s turbo pump, reported Oleg Ostapenko, chief of Roscosmos space agency.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 697, 703 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 16 May 14, 16 May 14, 16 May 14, 16 May 14, 16 May 14, 16 May 14, 16 May 14, 16 May 14, 20 May 14, 29 May 14, 29 May 14 ; Xinhu's 18 May 14, 29 May 14, 2 Jul 14 ; Gunter's Ekspress-AM 4R ;
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Navstar 66 (USA 251)
Spacecraft: Block IIF SV-6 / Navstar SVN-67 / GPS 2F-6 / Rigel
Chronologies: 2014 payload #76 ; 2014-26A ; 7,548th spacecraft, 39,741st space object.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 17 May 2014 at 0h03 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-37B, by a Delta 4M+(4,2).
Orbit: 20,460 km x 20,476 km x 55.0° 
Mission:
Notes: This launch marks the 366th Delta rocket launch since 1960 and the 26th Delta 4 rocket mission since 2002. It was also the 82nd United Launch Alliance mission since 2006.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 697 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-026A; Gunter's GPS-2F ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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NROL-33 (USA 252)
Spacecraft: QUASAR 18?
Chronologies: 2014 payload #77 ; 2014-27A ; 7,549th spacecraft, 39,751st space object.
Type: Communications? (Data relay) 
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. National REconnaissance Office (NRO)
Launch: 22 May 2014 at 13h09 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-41, by an Atlas V 401.
Orbit: Geostationary?
Mission: NRO’s L-33 mission reportedly placed a QUASAR data relay satellite into geosynchronous orbit.
Notes: This Atlas-Centaur marks the 628th launch for Atlas program since 1957 and the 217th mission for the Centaur upper stage. It is also the 46th launch of an Atlas 5 since 2002 and the 72nd Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) flight.  This is the 83rd United Launch Alliance flight overall and the 38th Atlas 5 under ULA.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 698 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-027A ; Gunter's Quasar 19 (SDS-3 8, NROL 33) ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Rodmik-S
Spacecraft: Strela-3M / Rodnik-S
Chronologies: 2014 payload #78 ; 2014-28A ; 7,550th spacecraft, 39,781st space object.
Type: Communications (Store/dump messages)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 23 May 2014 at 5h28 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by a Rokot.
Orbit: 1,480 km x 1,510 km x 82.4°
Mission: One of the three satellites which are part of the Russian military's Rodnik (or Strela 3M) system designed to relay messages between users posted in remote locations. These satellites are likely to receive designations Kosmos 2496, Kosmos 2497 and Kosmos 2498 (although three Kosmos numbered in the 2480's are missing).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 698 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 23 May 14, 23 May 14 ; RSNF's 23 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-028A ; Gunter's Strela-3M ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Rodnik-S
Spacecraft: Strela-3M / Rodnik-S
Chronologies: 2014 payload #79 ; 2014-28B ; 7,551st spacecraft, 39,762nd space object.
Type: Communications (Store/dump messages)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 23 May 2014 at 5h28 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by a Rokot.
Orbit: 1,480 km x 1,510 km x 82.4°
Mission: One of the three satellites which are part of the Russian military's Rodnik (or Strela 3M) system designed to relay messages between users posted in remote locations. These satellites are likely to receive designations Kosmos 2496, Kosmos 2497 and Kosmos 2498 (although three Kosmos numbered in the 2480's are missing).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 698 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 23 May 14, 23 May 14 ; RSNF's 23 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-028B ; Gunter's Strela-3M  ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Rodnik-S
Spacecraft: Strela-3M / Rodnik-S
Chronologies: 2014 payload #80 ; 2014-28C ; 7,552nd spacecraft, 39,763rd space object.
Type: Communications (Store/dump messages)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 23 May 2014 at 5h28 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by a Rokot.
Orbit: 1,480 km x 1,510 km x 82.4°
Mission: One of the three satellites which are part of the Russian military's Rodnik (or Strela 3M) system designed to relay messages between users posted in remote locations. These satellites are likely to receive designations Kosmos 2496, Kosmos 2497 and Kosmos 2498 (although three Kosmos numbered in the 2480's are missing).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 698; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 23 May 14, 23 May 14 ; RSNF's 23 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-028C ; Gunter's Strela-3M  ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Reshetnev Tech 2?
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #81 ; 2014-28E ; 7,553rd spacecraft, 39,765th space object.
Type: Technology?
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 23 May 2014 at 5:28 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by a Rokot.
Orbit: 1,480 km x 1,510 km x 82.4°
Mission: JSR: “An additional object, 39765/2014-028E, is suspected to be an additional small military payload, which may be eventually given the cover name Kosmos-2499. It is probably built by the Reshetnev company and may have a mass of around 45 kg.”
RSNF: “Since the December 2013 launch apparently delivered into orbit a fourth satellite, believed to be Cosmos-2491, it's possible that this pattern continued with the current launch. In this case, object 2014-028D/39761 could be Cosmos-2499. However, this will be clear only after the next Cosmos launch.”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 698 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; RSNF's 23 May 14 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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ALOS 2 / Daichi 2
Spacecraft: ALOS stands for Advanced Land Observing Satellite; Daichi is the Japanese word for land. 
Chronologies: 2014 payload #82 ; 2014-29A ; 7,554th spacecraft, 39,766th space object.
Type: Earht Observation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA / Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
Launch: 24 May 2014 at 3h05 UT, from Tanegashima's Yoshinobu Launch Pad No. 1 (YLP-1), by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: 629 km x 635 km x 97.9°
Mission: ALOS 2 is a 2,120-kg radar mapping satellite that collects high-resolution all-weather images of Earth for up to seven years.  Spacecraft imagery will help respond to man-made and natural disasters, monitor the environment, track food yields and crop production, study volcanoes and earthquakes, and manage forests. Manufactured by Mitsubishi Electric Co., it is a follow-on mission of ALOS 1 launched in 2006 and failed in orbit in May 2011, just after returning vital data in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that ravaged the coast of northern Japan. ALOS 2’s L-band synthetic aperture radar antenna, known as PALSAR 2, is able to see objects on the ground as small as 3 meters, an improvement from the ALOS 1, which had a top resolution of 10 meters. The upgrades also include a faster revisit time, since the ALOS 2 can image the same location on Earth every two weeks, while ALOS 1 could only do that every 46 days.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 698 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-029A ; Gunter's ALOS 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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UNIFORM 1
Spacecraft: UNIFORM stands for University International Formation Mission. 
Chronologies: 2014 payload #83 ; 2014-29B ; 7,555th spacecraft, 39,767th space object.
Type: Earth/space Ssiences
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Wakayama University, Japan
Launch: 24 May 2014 at 3h05 UT, from Tanegashima's Yoshinobu Launch Pad No. 1 (YLP-1), by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Circular at 628 kilometers x 97.9°
Mission: UNIFORM 1 is a 50-kg satellite part of a project to develop a wildfire monitoring system with small satellite constellation to achieve high-time resolution. The craft is based on a 50 × 50 × 50 cm satellite structure with two deployable solar arrays.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 698 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-029B ; Gunter's UNIFORM 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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SOCRATES
Spacecraft: SOCRATES stands for Space Optical Communications Research Advanced Technology Satellite.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #84 ; 2014-29C ; 7,556th spacecraft, 39,768th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NICT / National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Japan.
Launch: 24 May 2014 at 3h05 UT, from Tanegashima's Yoshinobu Launch Pad No. 1 (YLP-1), by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Circular at 628 kilometers x 97.9°
Mission: SOCRATES is a 48-kg satellite developed to demonstrate and validate the operation of SOTA (Small Optical Transponder), a laser communication system in space for microsatellites and eventually in nanosatellites. The craft is built by AES (Advanced Engineering Services Co., Ltd.) and uses the small satellite standard use with a deployable solar arrays. The satellite is three axis stabilized.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 698 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-029C ; Gunter's SOCRATES ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Rising 2 / Raijin 2
Spacecraft: Also called SpriteSat
Chronologies: 2014 payload #85 ; 2014-29D ; 7,557th spacecraft, 39,769th space object.
Type: Earth/space Sciences
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Tohoku University, Japan
Launch: 24 May 2014 at 3h05 UT, from Tanegashima's Yoshinobu Launch Pad No. 1 (YLP-1), by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Circular at 628 kilometers x 97.9°
Mission: Rising 2 is a 50-kg atmospheric study satellite which monitor sprites (lightning effects) phenomenon in the upper atmosphere.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 698 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-029D ; Gunter's Rising 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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SPROUT
Spacecraft: SPROUT stands for Space Research On Unique Technology.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #86 ; 2014-29E ; 7,558th spacecraft, 39,770th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Nihon University, Japan
Launch: 24 May 2014 at 3h05 UT, from Tanegashima's Yoshinobu Launch Pad No. 1 (YLP-1), by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Circular at 628 kilometers x 97.9°
Mission: SPROUT is a 5-kg technology satellite which carries out several experiments. It verified the deployment of a membrane structure and test at the end of the mission the de-orbiting by utilizing air-resistance by using the deployed membrane structure. Additionally, Earth imaging and amateur radio communications services by transmitting audio and visual data from space to Earth's surface was to be performed. It consists of a cubic main section that is 20 cm long per side, and a combined membrane structure section which is 1.5 metre long.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 698 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-029E ; Gunter's SPROUT ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Eutelsat 3B
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #87 ; 2014-30A ; 7,559th spacecraft, 39,773rd space object.
Type: Communications (Multi-services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Eutelsat
Launch: 26 May 2014 at 21h10 UT, from Odyssey Platform, by a Zenit-3SL.
Orbit: Geostationary at 3° East longitude.
Mission: Eutelsat 3B is a 5,967-kg communications satellite outfitted with 10 antennas and 51 transponders - 30 Ku-band, 12 C-band and 9 Ka-band - in a unique tri-band configuration to beam data, telecom, broadband and professional video services to users in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia and South America. The C-band and Ku-band payload focused on television broadcasting and data markets, while the Ka-band transponders, connected to steerable beams, are tailored for high-bandwidth markets. This tri-band configuration enables customers to be optimized for data, telecom, broadband and professional video services to a wide range of footprints coverage. The spacecraft replaced Eutelsat 3D in the 3° East location, allowing this satellite to be repositioned to serve other markets. Built by Airbus Defence and Space, Eutelsat 3B is based on the Airbus Eurostar E3000 satellite platform and is designed for a 15-year lifetime.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 698 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 19 Feb 14, 31 Mar 14, 5 May 14, 26 May 14, 27 Mai 14, 27 May 14,; Eutelsat's 19 Feb 14, 31 Mar 14, 14 May 14, 27 May 14 ; RSC Energia's 27 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-030A ; Gunter's Eutelsat 3B ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Soyuz TMA-13M / ISS-39S
Spacecraft: Soyuz 11F732A47 No. 713 
Chronologies: 2014 payload #88 ; 2014-31A ; 7,560th spacecraft, 39,775th space object.
Type: Piloted Spaceship
Families:
Ranks: 309th Soyuz (7K) spacecraft, 145th Soyuz spaceship (121st manned).
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 28 May 2014 at 19h58 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz-FG.
Orbit: Docked to the International Space Station
Recovered: 10 November 2014.
Mission: Soyuz TMA-13M is a crew transport spaceship that carriied ISS Expedition 40/41 crew to the International Space Station (Maxim Suraev, Reid Wiseman and Alexander Gerst). The spaceship docked with the Rassvet module on 29 May 2014 at 1h44 UT, 5 hours and 47 minutes after liftoff. The Soyuz spacecraft undocked from Rassvet on 10 November 2014 at 0h31 UT and landed in Kazakhstan at 3h58:35 UT.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 698, 705 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories, ISS Expdtition 40 and ISS Expdtition 41 ; RSC Energia's Photos Reports ; NASA's ISS Expdeition 40 and 2014 News Releases ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 28 May 14, 29 May 14, 29 May 14, 29 May 14, 11 Jun 14, 11 Jun 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-031A ; Gunter's Soyuz TMA-13M ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Glonass-M #55
Spacecraft: Glonass-M 55 / Uragan M43? or No. 755.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #89 ; 2014-32A ; 7,561st spacecraft, 40,001st space object.
Type:
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 14 June 2014 at 17h17 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/4, by a Soyuz-2.1b.
Orbit: 19,125 km x 19,153 km x 64.8°
Mission: This Glonass-M is a 1,415-kg navigation atellite. It was placed into the navigation system's third orbital plane to provide positioning services from orbital slot No. 21. The Glonass system has satellites in three orbital planes, each with eight spacecraft. As of 14 June 2014, the system comprised 29 satellites in orbit, including 24 operational, two spares, two satellites undergoing checks by their contractor and one platform in a flight testing phase. Operated by the Russian military, the Glonass broadcasts navigation signals to Russian military and civilian users around the world. It is Russia's counterpart to the U.S. Global Positioning System. Manufactured by ISS Reshetnev, this spacecraft is designed for a seven-year lifetime in orbit. It transmit an experimental navigation signal in the L3 frequency band, in addition to the standard L1 and L2 signals.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 698 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 14 Jun 14, 15 Jun 14 ; RSFN's 14 Jun 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-032A ; Gunter's Uragan-M ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Deimos 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #90 ; 2014-33D ; 7,562nd spacecraft, 40,013rd space object, 40,013rd space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Elecnor Deimos (Spain)
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: Deimos 2 is a 300-kg Earth observing satellite which supplied imagery to commercial clients. Its camera is able to see features as small as 75 centimeters. It joins the Deimos 1 satellite launched in 2009. Built in Spain in partnership with Satrec Initiative of South Korea, the craft is able to image any region on Earth every two days, panning up to 45 degrees on either side of its ground track to snap photos. Deimos 2’s costs are estimate to be 60 million euros, a figure that includes the satellite’s construction, launch and insurance.
Notes: This Dnepr launch carry into orbit a record 38 satellites belonging to customers from 17 countries. Kosmotras was the launch operator of this mission. The company was established in 1997 to implement the elimination of the SS-18 ICMBs that are being withdrawn from service and used for commercial launches. The Dnepr rockets are launched under a joint project commenced by Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan.
     The Dnepr rocket is a three-stage liquid-engine vehicle with a takeoff mass of 210 tonnes. The first two stages are the regular stages of the RS-20 rocket and have not been changed. The third stage has been worked on to improve its flight control system. The rocket is injected from an RS-20 silo by propellant gases. Its engine turns on after the whole vehicle has come out of the silo. The rocket is made by the Ukrainian company Yuzhmash in Dnepropetrovsk.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; RSFN's 19 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033D ; Gunter's Deimos 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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KazEOSat 2 / MRES
Spacecraft: KazEOSat 2 was formerly known as MRES (Medium Resolution Earth Observation Satellite). 
Chronologies: 2014 payload #91 ; 2014-33A ; 7,563rd spacecraft, 40,010th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Republic of Kazakhstan
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: KazEOSat 2, also known as KazMRES, is a 177-kg Earth observing satellite which supplied broadband multispectral imagery of Earth with a resolution of 6.75 metres in the interests of agriculture and land-use management, as well as for monitoring mineral resources and natural calamities. The satellite is built by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. to complements KazEOSat-1's high-resolution remote sensing spacecraft launched in April 2014.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033A ; Gunter's KaxEOSat 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Hodoyoshi 4
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #92 ; 2014-33B ; 7,564th spacecraft, 40,011th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: University of Tokyo, Japan
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: Hodoyoshi 4 is a 64-kg experimental Earth-observing satellite which has a high resolution imaging system with a ground resolution of 5 metres. Additionally it carries a store and forward communications payload and hosted experiments. The satellite monitors the environment around the Fukushima and Chernobyl nuclear power plants in Japan and Ukraine. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033B ; Gunter's Hodoyoshi 4 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Unisat 6
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #93 ; 2014-33C ; 7,565th spacecraft, 40,012nd space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: The Gauss Team, La Sapienza University of Rome, Italy
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: UniSat 6 is a 26-kg technology satellite intended to test customer equipment under space conditions and to deploy four cubesats in orbit. The craft is a 50-cm cube. It deployed the cubesats Tigrisat, Lemur 1, ANTELSAT and AeroCube 6, 25 hours and 34 minutes after launch. A camera acquired imagery of the deployment sequence.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033C ; Gunter's Unist 6 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Tita / BugSat 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #94 ; 2014-33E ; 7,566th spacecraft, 40,014th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Satellogic SA (Argentina)
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: Tita is a 22-kg technology demonstration Earth observation satellite (with resolution unknown). As the first technology demonstration satellite designed by the Argentinan company Satellogic S.A., this craft tests a number of custom designed components: three antennas, a mid-resolution camera system, a GPS receiver, a UHF radio based on COTS components and a C-Band radio based in COTS components. The satellite periodically and autonomously transmits packets for the Amateur radio community to receive in the UHF band.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033E ; Gunter's BugSat 1 / Tita ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Hodoyoshi 3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #95 ; 2014-33F ; 7,567th spacecraft, 40,015th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: University of Tokyo, Japan
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: Hodoyoshi 3 is a 58-kg experimental Earth-observing satellite which has a medium resolution imaging system with a ground resolution of 40 metres and 200 metres. Additionally, it carries a store and forward communications payload and hosted experiments. The satellite monitors the environment around the Fukushima and Chernobyl nuclear power plants in Japan and Ukraine.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033F ; Gunter's Hodoyoshi 3 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Saudisat 4
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #96 ; 2014-33G ; 7,568th spacecraft, 40,016th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Saudi Arabia/NASA
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: SaudiSat 4 is a 100-kg technology demonstration satellite which features a joint NASA Ames Research Center and KACST (King Abdulaziz City for Science & Technology) experiment to demonstrate technologies for future missions conducting research on gravitational waves. The craft features equipment for the control of charge build-up on free-floating test masses on drag-free spacecraft. Essentially, this technology will peremit extremely accurate accelerometer to allow its host spacecraft to fly in an orbit defined solely by gravity, and not be affected by solar pressure and atmospheric drag.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033G ; Gunter's SaudiSat 4 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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TabletSat-Aurora
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #97 ; 2014-33H ; 7,569th spacecraft, 40,017th space object.
Type: Technology (and Earth observation)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Sputnik (Russia)
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: TabletSat-Aurora is a 26.2-kg technological demonstration satellite intended for remote Earth sensing in the interests of a private company. It performs imagery with a ground resolution of 15 metres and a swath width of 47 km. The craft is the first Russian private satellite and was produced by the Russian company Sputnix (Satellite Innovation Space Systems), “It is an important step in developing the domestic space industry and innovative business,” said Mikhail Kokorich, president of Dauria Space satellite manufacturer. The satellite cost is about one million U.S. dollars and is made to operate for one year. The Sputnik company’s plans included “creating a cluster of small spacecraft and craft for super high-definition aerial video surveying and imaging with a resolution of down to one metre per pixel.”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033H ; Gunter's TabletSat-Aurora ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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AprizeSat 9
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #98 ; 2014-33J ; 7,570th spacecraft, 40,018th space object.
Type: Communications (Mariime Survey)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: SpaceQuest
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: AprizeSat-9 and 10 are 12-kg technology development satellites with AIS maritime location payloads. LatinSat, later renamed AprizeSat, is a constellation of small satellites (64 satellites planned) to achieve a global communication system of data transmission and fixed and mobile asset tracking and monitoring 
(GMPCS). AprizeSat 3 to 10 also feature an AIS (Automatic Identification System) receiver to gather position data from ships.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033J ; Gunter's LatinSat/AprizeSat ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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AprizeSat 10
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #99 ; 2014-33K ; 7,571st spacecraft, 40,019th space object.
Type: Communications (Mariime Survey)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: SpaceQuest
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: AprizeSat-9 and 10 are technology development satellites with AIS maritime location payloads. LatinSat, later renamed AprizeSat, is a constellation of small satellites (64 satellites planned) to achieve a global communication system of data transmission and fixed and mobile asset tracking and monitoring 
(GMPCS). AprizeSat 3 to 10 also feature an AIS (Automatic Identification System) receiver to gather position data from ships.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033K ; Gunter's LatinSat/AprizeSat ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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BRITE-Toronto
Spacecraft: Also named BRITE-CA 1 or CanX 3E.
BRITE stands for BRIght-star Target Explorer, and CanX stands for Canadian Advanced Nanospace eXperiments.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #100 ; 2014-33L ; 7,572nd spacecraft, 40,020th space object.
Type: Astronomy
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Canada
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: BRITE are 10-kg astronomical satellites which make photometric observations of some of the brightest stars in the sky in order to examine thir variability. These observations have a precision at least 10 times better than achievable using ground-based observations. These 20-cm cubic satellites incorporate a telescope, a number of technologies qualified on CanX-2 and high-performance attitude control system using reaction wheels. They are copies of the Austrian BRITE satellites UniBRITE and TUGsat 1 launched in 2013. BRITE-Montreal has an instrument sensitive to blue wavelength and BRITE-Toronto has a camera optimized for a red wavelength range.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033L ; Gunter's BRITE-CA 1, 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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BRITE-Montreal
Spacecraft: Also named BRITE-CA 2 or CanX 3F.
BRITE stands for BRIght-star Target Explorer, and CanX stands for Canadian Advanced Nanospace eXperiments.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #101 ; n/a ; 7,573rd spacecraft.
Type: Astronomy
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Canada
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Not releasd from the payload rack.
Mission: BRITE are 10-kg astronomical satellites which make photometric observations of some of the brightest stars in the sky in order to examine thir variability. These observations have a precision at least 10 times better than achievable using ground-based observations. These 20-cm cubic satellites incorporate a telescope, a number of technologies qualified on CanX-2 and high-performance attitude control system using reaction wheels. They are copies of the Austrian BRITE satellites UniBRITE and TUGsat 1 launched in 2013. BRITE-Montreal has an instrument sensitive to blue wavelength and BRITE-Toronto has a camera optimized for a red wavelength range.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's BRITE-CA 1, 2 ;
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Duchifat 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #102 ; 2014-33M ; 7,574th spacecraft, 40,021st space object.
Type: Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Herzilya Science Center, Israel
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile basee's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: Duchifat-1 is a 0.86-kg experimental and educational satellite developed and built by students of secondary school. It transmits real-time information via radio amateur packets.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's Duchifat 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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PACE
Spacecraft: PACE stands for Platform for Attitude Control Experiments.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #103 ; 2014-33N ; 7,575th spacecraft, 40,022nd space object.
Type: Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: National Chen Kung University, Taiwan.
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: PACE is a 2-kg cubesat project to provide students hands-on experiences. The craft also serve for the in-orbit investigation of different strategies for attitude determination and control.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's PACE ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Flock 1c-10
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #104 ; 2014-33P ; 7,576th spacecraft, 40,023rd space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived orbit. Planet Labs says the satellites allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's Flock-1, 1b, 1c ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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NanoSatC-Br 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #105 ; 2014-33Q ; 7,5677th spacecraft, 40,024th space object.
Type: Earth/space Sciences
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: INPE's Southern Center and UFSM, Brazil.
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: NanoSatC-Br 1 is a 1-kg cubesat, the first Brasilian cubesat, which  provide monitoring of Earth's magnetosphere by measuring the magnetic field over Brazil and to study the magnetic phenomena of the South Atlantic Anomaly and the Equatorial Electrojet.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSD 's 2014-033Q ; Gunter's NanoSatC-Br 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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QB50P1 / EO-79
Spacecraft: Also named European OSCAR 79 (EO 79) or OSCAR 79
Chronologies: 2014 payload #106 ; 2014-33R ; 7,578th spacecraft, 40,025th space object.
Type: Amateur/Student
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: European QB50 consortium
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: QB50P1 is a 2-kg cubesat, one of two precursor satellites for the QB50 project, which demonstrates the possibility of launching a network of 50 cubesats built by universities teams all over the world as a primary payload on a low-cost launch vehicle to perform first-class science in the largely unexplored lower thermosphere. The satellite is part of the European QB50 consortium project coordinated by the Von Karman Institute near Brussels and built by ISIS BV in Delft.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033R ; Gunter's QP50P1, 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Flock 1c-7
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #107 ; 2014-33S ; 7,579th spacecraft, 40,026th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived orbit. Planet Labs says the satellites allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699  ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033S ; Gunter's Flock-1, 1b, 1c ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Flock 1c-1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #108 ; 2014-33T ; 7,580th spacecraft, 40,027th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived orbit. Planet Labs says the satellites allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033T ; Gunter's Flock-1, 1b, 1c ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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POPSAT-HIP1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #109 ; 2014-33U ; 7,581st spacecraft, 40,028th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Microspace Rapid Pte Ltd. (Singapore)
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: POPSAT-HIP 1 is a 3-kg cubesat to demonstrate the functionality of a high-resolution optical payload and attitude control propulsion system on a cubesat-class nanosatellite.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033U ; Gunter's POPSAT-HIP 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Flock 1c-2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #110 ; 2014-33V ; 7,582nd spacecraft, 40,029th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived orbit. Planet Labs says the satellites allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033V ; Gunter's Flock-1, 1b, 1c ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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DTUSat 2
Spacecraft: DTUSat stands for Danmarks Tekniske Universitet Satellite.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #111 ; 2014-33W ; 7,583rd spacecraft, 40,030th space object.
Type: Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: DTU (Copenhagen)
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: DTUSat 2 is a 1-kg cubesat to demonstrate birds tracking from space. The system was developed by students and educators at DTU Space. It comprises a miniature radio-transmitter to be mounted on the carrier birds prior to the migration, and a receiver system onboard DTUSat 2. The system provides GPS position data for individual bird compact transmitters and hence yield unparalleled accuracy as compared to other systems.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's DTUSat 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Flock 1c-4
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #112 ; 2014-33X ; 7,584th spacecraft, 40,031st space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived orbit. Planet Labs says the satellites allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's2014-033X ; Gunter's Flock-1, 1b, 1c ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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QB50P2 / EO-80
Spacecraft: Also named European OSCAR 80 (EO 80) or OSCAR 80
Chronologies: 2014 payload #113 ; 2014-33Y ; 7,585th spacecraft, 40,032nd space object.
Type: Science
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: European QB50 consortium
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: QB50P1 is a 2-kg cubesat, one of two precursor satellites for the QB50 project, which demonstrates the possibility of launching a network of 50 cubesats built by universities teams all over the world as a primary payload on a low-cost launch vehicle to perform first-class science in the largely unexplored lower thermosphere. The satellite is part of the European QB50 consortium project coordinated by the Von Karman Institute near Brussels and built by ISIS BV in Delft.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033Y ; Gunter's QB50P2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;

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Flock 1c-11
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #114 ; 2014-33Z ; 7,586th spacecraft, 40,033rd space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived orbit. Planet Labs says the satellites allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS'18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter' NSSDC2014-033Z s Flock-1, 1b, 1c ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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ANTELSAT
Spacecraft: ANTEL is the Uruguayan telecom service provider.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #115 ; 2014-33AA ; 7,587th spacecraft., 40,034th space object
Type: Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ANTEL (Administracion Nacional de Telecomunicaciones) of Uruguay and the University of the Republic in Montevideo.
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: ANTELSAT is a 2-kg cubesat which purpose was to build and operate the first Uruguayan satellite and to develop skills in radio and aerospace engineering. The spacecraft transmits colour and infrared images of the surface of the Earth and provides several services to radio amateurs. It was deployed from UniSat 6. The project has been developed by the Uruguayan Facultad de Ingeniería de la Universidad de la República (FING), the State Faculty of Engineering, and the national telecom service provider ANTEL.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's ANTELSAT ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Flock 1c-9
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #116 ; 2014-33AB ; 7,588th spacecraft, 40,035th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived orbit. Planet Labs says the satellites allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's Flock-1, 1b, 1c ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Flock 1c-6
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #117 ; 2014-33AC ; 7,589th spacecraft, 40,036th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived orbit. Planet Labs says the satellites allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's Flock-1, 1b, 1c ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Perseus-M 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #118 ; 2014-33AD ; 7,590th spacecraft, 40,037th space object.
Type: Communications (Maritime Monitoring)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Dauria Aerospace
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: Perseus-M 1 and 2 are 6-kg maritime-surveillance satellites equipped with an experimental Automatic Identification System (AIS) payloads. The next segment of the constellation is the DX1 small satellite. Combined with DX1 spacecraft and eight Perseus-O imaging satellites, the eleven spacecrafts will form the Perseus space monitoring and remote sensing constellation. The maritime segment of the Perseus constellation will track and monitor vessels in open seas and navigable waterways in the United States, Canada, Northern Europe and Russia. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Dauria Aerospace's 24 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's Perseus-M1, 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Flock 1c-5
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #119 ; 2014-33AE ; 7,591st spacecraft, 40,038th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived orbit. Planet Labs says the satellites allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's Flock-1, 1b, 1c ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Perseus-M 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #120 ; 2014-33AF ; 7,592nd spacecraft, 40,039th space object.
Type: Communications (Maritime Monitoring)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Dauria Aerospace
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: Perseus-M 1 and 2 are 6-kg maritime-surveillance satellites equipped with an experimental Automatic Identification System (AIS) payloads. The next segment of the constellation is the DX1 small satellite. Combined with DX1 spacecraft and eight Perseus-O imaging satellites, the eleven spacecrafts will form the Perseus space monitoring and remote sensing constellation. The maritime segment of the Perseus constellation will track and monitor vessels in open seas and navigable waterways in the United States, Canada, Northern Europe and Russia. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS'18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Dauria Aerospace's 24 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's Perseus-M1, 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Flock 1c-8
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #121 ; 2014-33AG ; 7,593rd spacecraft, 40,040th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived orbit. Planet Labs says the satellites allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ;Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's Flock-1, 1b, 1c ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;

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Flock 1c-3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #122 ; 2014-33AH ; 7,594th spacecraft, 40,041st space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived orbit. Planet Labs says the satellites allow scientists and the public to track changes to Earth's surface. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.  699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-033 Gunter's Flock-1, 1b, 1c ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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PolyITAN 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #123 ; 2014-33AJ ; 7,595th spacecraft, 40,042nd space object.
Type: Amateur/Student
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: National Technical University of Ukraine (KPI), Ukrainian HAM radio community.
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: PolyITAN-1 is a 1-kg cubesat educational satellite build by students and space exploration enthusiasts.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's PolyITAN 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;

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Tigris / Tigrisat 
Spacecraft: Note: The Iraqi name for the satellite in Arabic is 'Tigris', the name used by the Italians is 'Tigrisat'.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #124 ; 2014-33AK ; 7,596th spacecraft, 40,043rd space object.
Type: Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Iraqi student at Roma La Sapienza (Italy)
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: Tigrisat is a 3-kg cubesat built by Iraqi students at the La Sapienza University of Rome with a mission to detect dust storms over Iraq. The craft features a camera with a new scripted algorithm for dust detection. Embedded magnetic coils inside solar panels provide attitude control to enable nadir pointing. Tigrisat transmits images to two ground stations, one located in Rome and another in Baghdad. it was deployed from UniSat 6. The project was funded by the Iraqi Ministry of Science and Technology.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's Tigrissat ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Lemur 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #125 ; 2014-33AL ; 7,597th spacecraft, 40,044th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NanoSatisfi Inc., United States
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: Lemur-1 is a 4-kg technology development cubesat carrying technology demonstration of several science payloads In addition to technology demonstration. It carries two Earth-observation payloads: an electro-optical imaging system, with a ground resolution of 5 metres, and a low-resolution IR imaging system, with a ground resolution of 1 km. Lemur-1 was deployed from UniSat 6.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's Lemur 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Aerocube 6A
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #126 ; 2014-33AM ; 7,598th spacecraft, 40,045th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Aerospace Corporation, United States
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: The Aerocube 6 is a pair of nanosatellite for technical research. It consists of two 0.5-kg cubesats which carried miniaturized dosimeters (for measuring radiation in the space), an inter-satellite cross-link experiment, an integrated flight computer, GPS receiver and UHF tranceiverand new attitude sensors. It was deployed from UniSat 6 and then separated into two satellites: AeroCube 6A and AeroCube 6B. Aerocube 6 represents a major upgrate in the Aerocube program as it introduces a redesigned cubesat structure and technical upgrades. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter'sAerocube 6A, 6B ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Aerocube 6B
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #127 ; 2014-33AN ; 7,599th spacecraft, 40,046th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Aerospace Corporation, United States
Launch: 19 June 2014 at 19h11 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: Circular at 630 km x 98°
Sun-synchronous orbits ranging from 550 to 610 km x 620 to 715 km.
Mission: The Aerocube 6 is a pair of nanosatellite for technical research. It consists of two 0.5-kg cubesats which carried miniaturized dosimeters (for measuring radiation in the space), an inter-satellite cross-link experiment, an integrated flight computer, GPS receiver and UHF tranceiverand new attitude sensors. It was deployed from UniSat 6 and then separated into two satellites: AeroCube 6A and AeroCube 6B. Aerocube 6 represents a major upgrate in the Aerocube program as it introduces a redesigned cubesat structure and technical upgrades. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Jun 14, 19 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua's 28 May 14 ; Gunter's Aerocube 6A, 6B ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;

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SPOT 7
Spacecraft: SPOT stands for “Satellite Probatoire pour l'Observation de la Terre”.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #128 ; 2014-34A ; 7,600th spacecraft, 40,053rd space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: France
Launch: 30 June 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Center's SHAR First Launch Pad, by a PSLV-CA.
Orbit: 695 km × 695 km x 98.2º 
Mission: SPOT 7 is a 712-kg Earth remote sensing satellite which offers 1.5-meter resolution in a 60 kilometer by 60 kilometer swath. It features two New AstroSat Optical Modular Instrument (NAOMI), high-resolution push-broom imagers based on a Korsch-type telescope designed and developed at EADS Astrium. SPOT 7 was placed in anorbit 180° apart from SPOT 6, launched in 2012, to maximize global coverage. Those satellites complement France's Pleiades 1 and Pleiades 1B, which supply higher resolution imagery but cover less territory per day. Built by Airbus Defence and Space, SPOT 7 is expected to function at least 10 years. Airbus built the SPOT 6 and 7 with private funding and hopes to sell the imagery to a range of commercial and government clients, including French military authorities, which already receive satellite photos from the two Pleiades spacecraft.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ISRO's PSLVC23 & 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua 30 Jun 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-034A ; Gunter's SPOT 6, 7 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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AISat 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #129 ; 2014-34B ; 7,601st spacecraftt, 40,054th space object.
Type: Technology (Maritime Monitoring)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: DLR, German Aerospace Centre, Germany
Launch: 30 June 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Center's SHAR, by a PSLV-CA.
Orbit:
Mission: AISat 1 is a 14-kg small satellite which carries an experimental spacecraft-based Automatic Identification System (AIS) sensor designed to collect information transmitted by vessels in busy shipping lanes, such as the North Sea and the U.S. East Coast. The spacecraft is carrying an experimental AIS receiver with a 4-metre helix antenna that also forms a gravity gradient boom. This high gain antenna enables the satellite to receive AIS signals as well as the Search and Rescue Transmitter signals. The spacecraft is built by the DLR Institute of Space Systems in Bremen.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ISRO's PSLVC23 & 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua30 Jun 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-034B ; Gunter's AISat-1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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CanX-4
Spacecraft: CanX stands for Canadian Advanced Nanospace eXperiments.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #130 ; 2014-34C ; 7,602nd spacecraft, 40,055th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Canada
Launch: 30 June 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Center's SHAR, by a PSLV-CA.
Orbit:
Mission: CanX-4 and CanX-5 are a pair of identical, 15-kg, small satellites which demonstrate an on-orbit formation flying with a cold gas propulsion system, an inter-satellite communications link and GPS receivers. They use technologies proven aboard CANX-2 to achieve and maintain several controlled formations in orbit. Flight formation are controlled with the second generation Nanosatellite Propulsion System (NANOPS) developed at UTIAS/SFL. During the mission, the team will evaluate the propellant usage in autonomous formation control strategies. The spacecraft employ innovative GPS techniques to obtain relative position measurements accurate to less than 10 cm. These satellites were built by the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ISRO's PSLVC23 & 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua30 Jun 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-034C ; Gunter's CanX-4, 5 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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CanX 5
Spacecraft: CanX stands for Canadian Advanced Nanospace eXperiments.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #131 ; 2014-34D ; 7,603rd spacecraft, 40,056th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Canada
Launch: 30 June 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Center's SHAR, by a PSLV-CA.
Orbit:
Mission: CanX-4 and CanX-5 are a pair of identical, 15-kg, small satellites which demonstrate an on-orbit formation flying with a cold gas propulsion system, an inter-satellite communications link and GPS receivers. They use technologies proven aboard CANX-2 to achieve and maintain several controlled formations in orbit. Flight formation are controlled with the second generation Nanosatellite Propulsion System (NANOPS) developed at UTIAS/SFL. During the mission, the team will evaluate the propellant usage in autonomous formation control strategies. The spacecraft employ innovative GPS techniques to obtain relative position measurements accurate to less than 10 cm. These satellites were built by the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ISRO's PSLVC23 & 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua30 Jun 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-034D ; Gunter's CanX-4, 5 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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VELOX-I-NSat
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #132 ; 2014-34E ; 7,604th spacecraft, 40,057th space object.
Type: Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Nanyang Technical University in Singapore
Launch: 30 June 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Center's SHAR, by a PSLV-CA.
Orbit:
Mission: The VELOX-I mission consists of two satellites, the 4.28-kg VELOX-1-NSAT and the 0.25-kg VELOX-1-PSAT subsatellite. The mother craft is equipped with a camera sensor to take 20-metre-resolution Earth’s photographs. VELOX-1-NSAT has a projected life time of 2 years while VELOX-1-PSAT has a 1 year expected operation. They were built by students and researchers as part of NTU’s Undergraduate Satellite Program. The objective of the mission is to provide hands-on experience on a space project for students and to conduct several technology demonstrations.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Storie ; ISRO's PSLVC23 & 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua30 Jun 14, 3 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-034E ; Gunter's VELOX-1-NSAT ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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VELOX-I-PSat
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #133 ; 2014-34 ; 7,605th spacecraft.
Type: Student (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Nanyang Technical University in Singapore
Launch: 30 June 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Center's SHAR, by a PSLV-CA.
Orbit:
Mission: The VELOX-I mission consists of two satellites, the 4.28-kg VELOX-1-NSAT and the 0.25-kg VELOX-1-PSAT subsatellite. The mother craft is equipped with a camera sensor to take 20-metre-resolution Earth’s photographs. VELOX-1-NSAT has a projected life time of 2 years while VELOX-1-PSAT has a 1 year expected operation. They were built by students and researchers as part of NTU’s Undergraduate Satellite Program. The objective of the mission is to provide hands-on experience on a space project for students and to conduct several technology demonstrations.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Storie ; ISRO's PSLVC23 & 20 Jun 14 ; Xinhua 30 Jun 14, 3 Jul 14 ; Gunter's VELOX-1-PSAT;
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OCO-2
Spacecraft: OCO stands for Orbiting Carbon Observatory
Chronologies: 2014 payload #134 ; 2014-35A ; 7,606th spacecraft, 40,059th space object.
Type: Earth/space Sciences
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 2 July 2014 at 9h56 UT, from Vandenberg Air Force Base's SLC-2W, by a Delta II 7320-10C.
Orbit: 688 km x 694 km x 98.2°
Mission: OCO-2 is a 450-kg Earth observation satellite which map global CO2 sources around the globe. It carries a single instrument, consisting of three high-resolution grating spectrometers (instruments that measure properties of light within the electromagnetic spectrum).
     OCO-2 is NASA’s first spacecraft dedicated to measure carbon dioxide levels in Earth’s atmosphere. It samples the global distribution of the sources and sinks of carbon dioxide and allow scientists to study their changes over time. The mission will provide a more complete, global picture of the human and natural sources of carbon dioxide, as well as their the natural ocean and land processes by which carbon dioxide is pulled out of Earth’s atmosphere and stored. OCO-2 is the lead satellite in a constellation of five other international Earth monitoring satellites that circle Earth once every 99 minutes and cross the equator each day near 13:36 local time, making a wide range of nearly simultaneous Earth observations. The spacecraft replaces a nearly identical NASA spacecraft, OCO, lost at launch in 2009 and is designed to operate for at least two years.
     The spacecraft is based on Orbital Sciences Corp's LeoStar-2 plaftorm. It is a hexagonal structure approximately 1 meter in diameter and 2 meters tall. Two solar array wings, each approximately 3 meters in length, are attach to either side of the spacecraft.
     This launch mark the first use of the semi-retired Delta II rocket since 2011.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699, 701 ; Spaceflight Now's 2013 Stories, 2014 Stories ; NASA's OCO-2, 2010-2014 Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-035A ; Gunter's OCO 1, 2 (ESSP 5) ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Gonets-M 7
Spacecraft: Gonets means "messenger" in Russian.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #135 ; 2014-36A ; 7,607th spacecraft, 40,061st space object.
Type: Communications (Store/dump)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 3 July 2014 at 12h44 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by a Rokot/Briz-KM.
Orbit: 1,480 km x 1,510 km x 82.5°
Mission: One of the three Gonets-M communication satellites which enlarge this system to ten spacecrafts. The Gonest are used for monitoring different infrastructure facilities, transmitting navigation and time parameters established by the Glonass system. The Gonets system is intended for establishing communication and transmitting various data, including coordinates and temperature parameters provided by GLONASS. These informations are transmitted by a series of Gonets satellites flying on a low orbit (at 1,400 km altitude). Messages relayed by the Gonets system are beamed up to a satellite while it is in view of a ground transmitter, then stored in the craft's on-board memory until the satellite passes over the message's recipient. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 2 Jul 14, 3 Jul 14 ; RSFN's 3 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-036A ; Gunter's Gonets M ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Gonets-M 8
Spacecraft: Gonets means "messenger" in Russian.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #136 ; 2014-36B ; 7,608th sspacecraft, 40,062nd space object.
Type: Communications (Store/dump)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 3 July 2014 at 12h44 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by a Rokot/Briz-KM.
Orbit: 1,480 km x 1,510 km x 82.5°
Mission: One of the three Gonets-M communication satellites which enlarge this system to ten spacecrafts. The Gonest are used for monitoring different infrastructure facilities, transmitting navigation and time parameters established by the Glonass system. The Gonets system is intended for establishing communication and transmitting various data, including coordinates and temperature parameters provided by GLONASS. These informations are transmitted by a series of Gonets satellites flying on a low orbit (at 1,400 km altitude). Messages relayed by the Gonets system are beamed up to a satellite while it is in view of a ground transmitter, then stored in the craft's on-board memory until the satellite passes over the message's recipient. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 2 Jul 14, 3 Jul 14 ; RSFN's 3 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-036B ; Gunter's Gonets M ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Gonets-M 9
Spacecraft: Gonets means "messenger" in Russian.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #137 ; 2014-36C ; 7,609th spacecraft, 40,063rd space object.
Type: Communications (Store/dump)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 3 July 2014 at 12h44 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-133/3, by a Rokot/Briz-KM.
Orbit: 1,480 km x 1,510 km x 82.5°
Mission: One of the three Gonets-M communication satellites which enlarge this system to ten spacecrafts. The Gonest are used for monitoring different infrastructure facilities, transmitting navigation and time parameters established by the Glonass system. The Gonets system is intended for establishing communication and transmitting various data, including coordinates and temperature parameters provided by GLONASS. These informations are transmitted by a series of Gonets satellites flying on a low orbit (at 1,400 km altitude). Messages relayed by the Gonets system are beamed up to a satellite while it is in view of a ground transmitter, then stored in the craft's on-board memory until the satellite passes over the message's recipient.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 2 Jul 14, 3 Jul 14 ; RSFN's 3 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-036C ; Gunter's Gonets M ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Meteor-M 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #138 ; 2014-37A ; 7,610th spacecraft, 40,069th space object.
Type: Meteorology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 8 July 2014 at 15h58 UT, from Beikonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat-M.
Orbit: 818 km x 828 km x 98.8°
Mission: Meteor-M 2 is a 2,778-kg meteorological satellite, the second of the new generation of Russian metesat which replaced the Meteor-3M series. It collects global information for weather forecasting, monitors the ozone layer and the radiation environment in near-Earth space, measure sea surface temperatures, and track ice in the polar regions to aid navigation. The spacecraft's six instruments include multi-channel cameras, a microwave radiometer and infrared sounder to measure temperature and moisture in the atmosphere, an X-band radar payload to detect ice, snow and vegetation, and a radiation detector to probe the environment around the satellite. It also carries a radio system to relay data from remote weather stations and ocean buoys on the ground. Meteor-M2 launch came nearly five years after the launch of Meteor M1 satellite, which is still operating. Built by the VNIIEM Research and Production Corporation, it is designed for a five-year mission.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 16 May 14, 8 Jul 14, 9 Jul 14, 9 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-037A ; Gunter's Meteor-M ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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MKA-FKI Relek
Spacecraft: PN2
Chronologies: 2014 payload #139 ; 2014-37B ; 7,611th spacecraft, 40,070th space object.
Type: Earth/space Sciences
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 8 July 2014 at 15h58 UT, from Beikonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat-M.
Orbit: 638 km x 825 km x 98.8° 
Mission: MKA-FKI Relek is ~250-kg science satellite featuring a magnetospheric payloads to study high-altitude electrical discharges, atmospheric phenomena and electron precipitation from the Earth’s radiation belts. It was developed at the Lavochkin scientific and production centre.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 16 May 14, 8 Jul 14, 9 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-037B ; Gunter's Relek ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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DX-1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #140 ; 2014-37C ; 7,612nd spacecraft, 40,071st space object.
Type: Technology (Maritime Monitoring)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Dauria Aerospace (Russia)
Launch: 8 July 2014 at 15h58 UT, from Beikonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat-M.
Orbit: 635 km x 635 km x 98.8°
Mission: DX 1 is a 27-kg technology satellite to test equipment, technology and software to create a unified platform of small spacecraft. It carries an Automatic Identification System (AIS) receiver for tracking ship traffic. The satellite monitors shipping in oceans and rivers with the use of AIS, it is the first satellite with such a function in Russia. Built by the Dauria Aerospace of Moscow, it is the first-ever Russian satellite funded completely by domestic private capital. The company expects to create a new generation of satellites for various purposes with minimal rework for specific functions. DX-1 is a cube-shape craft measuring 40 cm × 40 cm × 30 cm.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 16 May 14, 8 Jul 14, 9 Jul 14, 9 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-037C ; Gunter's DX-1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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SkySat 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #141 ; 2014-37D ; 7,613rd spacecraft, 40,072nd space object.
Type: Earth-Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Skybox Imaging
Launch: 8 July 2014 at 15h58 UT, from Beikonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat-M.
Orbit: 635 km x 635 km x 98.8°
Mission: SkySat 2 is a 100-kg commercial Earth observation satellite licensed to collect high-resolution panchromatic and multispectral images of the Earth for Skybox Imaging (which was acquired by Google in June 2014). The craft is equipped with a unique camera to gather information, processors to read it and correct inaccuracies and a radio system to send data to Earth. It is designed to make high resolution images and HD video. With design live of 6 years, SkySat 2 joins SkySat-1 launched in November 2013. Skybox plans to send up more satellites in 2015.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 16 May 14, 8 Jul 14, 9 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-037D ; Gunter's SkySat-2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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UKube 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #142 ; 2014-37F ; 7,614th spacecraft, 40,074th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Clyde Space (Scotland)
Launch: 8 July 2014 at 15h58 UT, from Beikonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat-M.
Orbit: 635 km x 635 km x 98.8°
Mission: UKube 1 is a 4-kg cubesat to test new cutting-edge technologies in space. The craft carries a camera to take pictures of Earth and a payload to demonstrate the feasibility of using impacts from cosmic particles to make satellite communications more secure. The craft measures just 10 cm × 10 cm × 34 cm and is the first satellite built in Scotland. Designed and assembled by Clyde Space in Glasgow, it was jointly funded by Clyde Space and the UK Space Agency.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 16 May 14, 8 Jul 14, 9 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-037F ; Gunter's UKube 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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AISSat 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #143 ; 2014-37G ; 7,615th spacecraft, 40,075th space object.
Type: Technology (Communications, Maritime Monitoring)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Government of Norway
Launch: 8 July 2014 at 15h58 UT, from Beikonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat-M.
Orbit: 635 km x 635 km x 98.8°
Mission: AISSat 2 is a 7-kg satellite which investigates the feasibility and performance of a spacet-based Automatic Identification System (AIS) sensor in low-Earth orbit as a means for tracking maritime assets. Built by UTIAS/SFL, the 20-cm cubic satellite is based on the Generic Nanosatellite Bus (GNB).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 16 May 14, 8 Jul 14, 9 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-037G ; Gunter's AISSAT 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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TDS 1 / TechDemoSat 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #144 ; 2014-37H ; 7,616th spacecraft, 40,076th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (United Kingdom)
Launch: 8 July 2014 at 15h58 UT, from Beikonur Cosmodrome's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat-M.
Orbit: 635 km x 635 km x 98.8°
Mission: TDS 1is a 150-kg technology-development satellite which acts as a host for a number of technology experiments, It also monitors ocean surface, study space and its influence on space equipment and conducts remote Earth probing. Built by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd., the UK’s Technology Strategy Board and the South East England Development Agency have provided a £770,000 to fund the core mission design elements. SSTL, UK industry and UK academia had fund payload technologies  Following a successful design phase, a further grant of £2,730,000 was released to built and launch the satellite. Engineers hope that the high-tech payloads will be a pathfinder for future missions. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 16 May 14, 8 Jul 14, 9 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-037H ; Gunter's TDS-1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Angara 1.2PP
Spacecraft: PP means Pervy Polyot, first flight.
Chronologies: 2014 payload n/a (suborbital test flight)
Type: Technology (new launcher test)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russia
Launch: 9 July 2014 at 12h08 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome, by an Angara.
Orbit: n/a
Mission: Angara 1.1PP (“Pervy Polyot“, first flight) is the mainden flight of the new Russian modular rocket designed to become the workhorse of Russia's space program by replacing most of the Russian launchers (see Note below). The Angara rocket lifted off on 9 July 2014 at 4:08 Moscow time, and flew for 25 minutes on a sub-orbital ballistic trajectory before landing at the Kura test-range in the far eastern Kamchatka Peninsula, 5,700 kilometers away from its launch site.
     The first stage of the Angara-1.2PP is a single “Universal Rocket Module”, URM-1, with an RD-191 engine, and the second stage, URM-2, using an RD-0124A engine. The demonstration flight carries an instrumentation payload to measure various technical parameters during the suborbital mission. Angara 1.1PP was launch from the new launch facility at Plesetsk’s site 35, a launch pad originally designed for the Zenit rocket but modified to host the Angara launcher.
     Initially, Angara 1.1PP was scheduled to lift off on 27 June 2014, but the counteown was automatically stopped in the final minutes. Three days later, the rocket was removed from the launch pad for additional checks. On 5 July, it was reported that this first attempt was cancelled due to a faulty valve of the liquid oxygen tank: “The valve’s malfunctioning was a result of sloppy assembly.”
Notes: According to Russian sources, a big advantage of the new Angara launcher is its “universal space rocket system” capable of taking three types of carrier rockets launched from the same launch pad: light, with a payload of up to 3.5 tonnes, medium, with a payload of up to 14.6 tonnes, and heavy, with a payload of up to 24.5 tonnes. The vehicle uses a unique design since it can be assembled of one or more “Universal Rocket Module,” (URM). The number of URM is five in a heavy version, three in a medium version, and one in a light version. 
     The rockets are based on modules powered by the RD-191 engine using kerosene and liquid oxygen. One such module makes up the first stage of the light class Angara 1.1 and Angara 1.2 boosters. (Their second stages are different.) The medium and heavy class boosters Angara-3 and Angara 4 are an extension of the light class types with additional three or four universal modules. The booster can be equipped with the Briz-M or KVRB accelerator upper stage.
     The Angara 1 light class of small launchers is intended to replace the Kosmos-3M, Tsyklon and Rokot launchers. The Angara 3, a medium-lift launcher, is meant to eventually replace the Zenit and Angara 5 is meant to replace the heavy-lift Proton. A future super heavy-lift Angara 7 is also planned if needed.
     The Angara project started in 1993 with the goal to develop a new national space launch system. The family of these rockets has been under development since 1994.
History: ITAR-TASS news agency reports: “Angara is the first civilian rocket developed by Russia since the death of Soviet space rocket designer Sergei Korolyov in 1966.
     After the USSR’s disintegration in 1991, Russia felt an urgent need to create a heavy-class carrier rocket. In 1992, three Russian companies, including RSC Energia, the Khrunichev Space Center and the Makeyev Rocket Design Bureau, took part in the designing of a heavy space rocket complex. In 1994, the Khrunichev won the contract. A year later, in 1995, the Russian government passed a resolution setting the deadline for starting the Angara flight tests: 2005.
     The prototype of Angara’s first stage (URM-1) was successfully flight tested as part of the first South Korean KSLV-1 carrier rocket in 2009, 2010 and 2013.
     More than 100 billion rubles (approx. $2.9 billion) have been invested in the Angara project over the past 20 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS 21 Dec 13, 31 Jan 14, 7 Feb 14, 17 Feb 14, 19 Feb 14, 17 Mar 14, 18 Apr 14, 5 May 14, 4 Jun 14, 20 Jun 14, 26 Jun 14, 27 Jun 14, 27 Jun 14, 14 Jul 14, 15 Jul 14 ; SpaceRef's 23 Jun 14, 30 Jun 14, 2 Jul 14, 5 Jul 14, 9 Jul 14, 9 Jul 14 ; MT's 9 Jul 14 ;
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O3b FM-8
Spacecraft: O3b stands for Other 3 billion people.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #145 ; 2014-38A ; 7,617th spacecraft, 40,082nd space object.
Type: Communications (Internet services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: O3b Networks
Launch: 10 July 2014 at 18h56 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELS, by a Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat (ST-B, VS08).
Orbit: 7,830 km x 7,840 km x 0.0°
Mission: O3b are 700-kg communications satellites which provide high-speed wireless Internet services to underserved and emerging markets. Equipped with 12 Ka-band transponders, these satellites offer high throughput, low latency telecommunications and Internet trunking services to the “other 3 billion” (O3b) people who do not yet enjoy broadband access. With this second launch, the O3b constellation is deployed in its initial configuration and will be fully operational. O3b provide low-cost broadband for Internet access for emerging markets in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Australia and the Middle East, nearly 150 countries. O3b Networks provides telecom operators with trunking capacity and connectivity for mobile networks at rates and response times equal to fiber-optic networks. Built by Thales Alenia Space, each satellite has a 10-year life expectency.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories; Arianespace's Press Kit, Launch Video & Press Release , O3b Networks's 6 Sep 13, 24 Mar 14, 24 Mar 14, 24 Apr 14, 10 Jul 14 ; Thales Alenia's 11 Jul 14 ; ITAR-TASS' 17 Jun 14, 8 Jul 14, 10 Jul 14, 10 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-03A ; Gunter's O3b ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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O3b FM-6
Spacecraft: O3b stands for Other 3 billion people.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #146 ; 2014-38B ; 7,618th spacecraft, 40,080th space object.
Type: Communications (Internet services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: O3b Networks
Launch: 10 July 2014 at 18h56 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELS, by a Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat (ST-B, VS08).
Orbit: 7,830 km x 7,840 km x 0.0°
Mission: O3b are 700-kg communications satellites which provide high-speed wireless Internet services to underserved and emerging markets. Equipped with 12 Ka-band transponders, these satellites offer high throughput, low latency telecommunications and Internet trunking services to the “other 3 billion” (O3b) people who do not yet enjoy broadband access. With this second launch, the O3b constellation is deployed in its initial configuration and will be fully operational. O3b provide low-cost broadband for Internet access for emerging markets in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Australia and the Middle East, nearly 150 countries. O3b Networks provides telecom operators with trunking capacity and connectivity for mobile networks at rates and response times equal to fiber-optic networks. Built by Thales Alenia Space, each satellite has a 10-year life expectency.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Arianespace's Press Kit, Launch Video& Press Release , O3b Networks's 6 Sep 13, 24 Mar 14, 24 Mar 14, 24 Apr 14, 10 Jul 14 ; Thales Alenia's 11 Jul 14 ; ITAR-TASS' 17 Jun 14, 8 Jul 14, 10 Jul 14, 10 Jul 14  NSSDC's 2014-038 ; Gunter's O3b ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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O3b FM-7
Spacecraft: O3b stands for Other 3 billion people.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #147 ; 2014-38C ; 7,619th spacecraft, 40,081st space object.
Type: Communications (Internet services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: O3b Networks
Launch: 10 July 2014 at 18h56 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELS, by a Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat (ST-B, VS08).
Orbit: 7,830 km x 7,840 km x 0.0°
Mission: O3b are 700-kg communications satellites which provide high-speed wireless Internet services to underserved and emerging markets. Equipped with 12 Ka-band transponders, these satellites offer high throughput, low latency telecommunications and Internet trunking services to the “other 3 billion” (O3b) people who do not yet enjoy broadband access. With this second launch, the O3b constellation is deployed in its initial configuration and will be fully operational. O3b provide low-cost broadband for Internet access for emerging markets in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Australia and the Middle East, nearly 150 countries. O3b Networks provides telecom operators with trunking capacity and connectivity for mobile networks at rates and response times equal to fiber-optic networks. Built by Thales Alenia Space, each satellite has a 10-year life expectency.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Arianespace's Press Kit, Launch Video & Press Release , O3b Networks's 6 Sep 13, 24 Mar 14, 24 Mar 14, 24 Apr 14, 10 Jul 14 ; Thales Alenia's 11 Jul 14 ; ITAR-TASS' 17 Jun 14, 8 Jul 14, 10 Jul 14, 10 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-03C ;Gunter's O3b ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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O3b FM-3
Spacecraft: O3b stands for Other 3 billion people.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #148 ; 2014-38D ; 7,620th spacecraft, 40,074th space object.
Type: Communications (Internet services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: O3b Networks
Launch: 10 July 2014 at 18h56 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELS, by a Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat (ST-B, VS08).
Orbit: 7,830 km x 7,840 km x 0.0°
Mission: O3b are 700-kg communications satellites which provide high-speed wireless Internet services to underserved and emerging markets. Equipped with 12 Ka-band transponders, these satellites offer high throughput, low latency telecommunications and Internet trunking services to the “other 3 billion” (O3b) people who do not yet enjoy broadband access. With this second launch, the O3b constellation is deployed in its initial configuration and will be fully operational. O3b provide low-cost broadband for Internet access for emerging markets in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Australia and the Middle East, nearly 150 countries. O3b Networks provides telecom operators with trunking capacity and connectivity for mobile networks at rates and response times equal to fiber-optic networks. Built by Thales Alenia Space, each satellite has a 10-year life expectency.
Notes Founded in 2007 and backed by Luxembourg-based satellite operator SES, Google and HSBC — plus other venture capital firms — O3b aims to revolutionize communications in the developing world by providing broadband Internet connectivity to telecommunications providers, national governments, oil and gas firm, and luxury cruise liners. O3b stands for the “other 3 billion,” referencing the approximate number of people without reliable, high-speed Internet connections.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Arianespace's Press Kit, Launch Video & Press Release , O3b Networks's 6 Sep 13, 24 Mar 14, 24 Mar 14, 24 Apr 14, 10 Jul 14 ; Thales Alenia's 11 Jul 14 ; ITAR-TASS' 17 Jun 14, 8 Jul 14, 10 Jul 14, 10 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-03D ; Gunter's O3b ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Cygnus Orb-2 / CRS-2 / PCM-2 (“Janice Voss”)
Spacecraft: CRS stands for Commercial Resupply Services.
The cargocraft is named after astronaut Janice Voss
Chronologies: 2014 payload #149 ; 2014-39A ; 7,621st spacecraft, 40,084th space object.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbital Science for NASA
Launch: 13 July 2014 at 16h52 UT, from Wallops Flight Facility's Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport's Launch Pad 0A, by an Antares 120.
Orbit: Docked to the International Space Sation.
Deorbited: 17 August 2014.
Mission: Cygnus Orb-2 is a 4.1-ton cargo transport spacecraft which deliver 1,664 kilograms of supplies to the International Space Station, including science experiments, hardware and spare parts, and crew provisions (including more than a half-ton of food, a pump for the Japanese laboratory and hardware for future spacewalks to install nitrogen and oxygen system outside ISS). The spaceship delivered 768 kg of crew supplies, 355 kg of hardware and spare parts and 327 kg of science experiments. Also onboard are 29 (or 32) cubesats and numerous student experiments.
     Cygnus spacecraft was captured by the Canadarm2 on 16 July 2014 at 10h35 UT and then docked to the Harmony module. This is the second operational resupply run by Orbital Science Corp., under a $1.9 billion NASA contract to deliver up to 20 tons of cargo to the ISS over eight missions through late 2016. The cargo craft departed ISS on 15 August 2014; it was unberthed from the Harmony nadir port at 9h14 UT and released by Canadarm2 at 10h40 UT. It reentered on 17 August at 13h15 UT over the South Pacific.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 699, 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NASA News Releases & Orbital's mission ; OSC's 12 Jul 14, 13 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-039A ; Gunter's Cynus PGM ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Orbcomm OG2-9 / Orbcomm FM109
Spacecraft: Orbcomm FM49 / Orbcomm FM104
Chronologies: 2014 payload #150 ; 2014-40A ; 7,626th spacecraft, 40,086th space object.
Type: Communications (Mobile Services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbcomm
Launch: 14 July 2014 at 15h15 UT, from Cape Caneveral Air Froce Station's LC-40, by a Falcon 9 v1.1.
Orbit:
Mission: OG-2 (Orbcomm generation 2) are 172-kg communications satellites which provide machine-to-machine (M2M) data transmission to track, monitor and control mobile and fixed assets in commercial transportation, heavy equipment, industrial fixed assets, marine and homeland security. Each satellite is equipped with an enhanced communications payload designed to increase subscriber capacity by up to 12 times over the current OG-1 satellites. Customers are able to transmit data at greater speeds and send larger data packets. The satellites are also equipped with an Automatic Identification System (AIS) payload to receive and report transmissions from AIS-equipped vessels for ship tracking and other maritime navigational and safety efforts. 
     The Falcon 9 rocket placed the six Orbcomm in an orbit just a half-kilometer off prelaunch predictions and an inclination five one-thousandths of a degree off the rocket's target. The satellites will not need to use extra propellant loaded into their fuel tanks to correct a potential orbit injection error. All six satellites were deployed as planned, all antenna and solar panels have been deployed as designed.
     The OG-2 join 25 operational OG-1, launched more than 15 years ago and which have operated years longer than designed, and plus a pair of small ship-tracking spacecraft used by Orbcomm. The company anticipates launching the remaining eleven OG2 by the end of 2014 to complete its next generation constellation. 
     The launch was part of a $42.6 million two-launch contract package purchased by Orbcomm at a discount from SpaceX's advertised Falcon 9 launch prices. Total contract value for the 18 spacecraft was $117 million and Orbcomm officials say the company's investment in the second-generation satellite fleet is worth approximately $230 million. (The company has an option to purchase up to 30 additional OG2 satellites.) Built by Sierra Nevada Corp., OG-2 are designed for a 10-year lifetime.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Orbcomm's 14 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-041E ; Gunter's Orbcomme OG-1 to 18 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Orbcomm OG2-7 / Orbcomm FM107
Spacecraft: Orbcomm FM48 / Orbcomm FM111
Chronologies: 2014 payload #151 ; 2014-40D ; 7,625th spacecraft, 40,087th space object.
Type: Communications (Mobile Services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbcomm
Launch: 14 July 2014 at 15h15 UT, from Cape Caneveral Air Froce Station's LC-40, by a Falcon 9 v1.1.
Orbit:
Mission: OG-2 (Orbcomm generation 2) are 172-kg communications satellites which provide machine-to-machine (M2M) data transmission to track, monitor and control mobile and fixed assets in commercial transportation, heavy equipment, industrial fixed assets, marine and homeland security. Each satellite is equipped with an enhanced communications payload designed to increase subscriber capacity by up to 12 times over the current OG-1 satellites. Customers are able to transmit data at greater speeds and send larger data packets. The satellites are also equipped with an Automatic Identification System (AIS) payload to receive and report transmissions from AIS-equipped vessels for ship tracking and other maritime navigational and safety efforts. 
     The Falcon 9 rocket placed the six Orbcomm in an orbit just a half-kilometer off prelaunch predictions and an inclination five one-thousandths of a degree off the rocket's target. The satellites will not need to use extra propellant loaded into their fuel tanks to correct a potential orbit injection error. All six satellites were deployed as planned, all antenna and solar panels have been deployed as designed.
     The OG-2 join 25 operational OG-1, launched more than 15 years ago and which have operated years longer than designed, and plus a pair of small ship-tracking spacecraft used by Orbcomm. The company anticipates launching the remaining eleven OG2 by the end of 2014 to complete its next generation constellation. 
     The launch was part of a $42.6 million two-launch contract package purchased by Orbcomm at a discount from SpaceX's advertised Falcon 9 launch prices. Total contract value for the 18 spacecraft was $117 million and Orbcomm officials say the company's investment in the second-generation satellite fleet is worth approximately $230 million. (The company has an option to purchase up to 30 additional OG2 satellites.) Built by Sierra Nevada Corp., OG-2 are designed for a 10-year lifetime.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Orbcomm's 14 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-040D ; Gunter's Orbcomme OG-1 to 18 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Orbcomm OG2-6 / Orbcomm FM106
Spacecraft: Orbcomm FM47 / Orbcomm FM106
Chronologies: 2014 payload #152 ; 2014-40C ; 7,624th spacecraft, 40,088th space object.
Type: Communications (Mobile Services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbcomm
Launch: 14 July 2014 at 15h15 UT, from Cape Caneveral Air Froce Station's LC-40, by a Falcon 9 v1.1.
Orbit:
Mission: OG-2 (Orbcomm generation 2) are 172-kg communications satellites which provide machine-to-machine (M2M) data transmission to track, monitor and control mobile and fixed assets in commercial transportation, heavy equipment, industrial fixed assets, marine and homeland security. Each satellite is equipped with an enhanced communications payload designed to increase subscriber capacity by up to 12 times over the current OG-1 satellites. Customers are able to transmit data at greater speeds and send larger data packets. The satellites are also equipped with an Automatic Identification System (AIS) payload to receive and report transmissions from AIS-equipped vessels for ship tracking and other maritime navigational and safety efforts. 
     The Falcon 9 rocket placed the six Orbcomm in an orbit just a half-kilometer off prelaunch predictions and an inclination five one-thousandths of a degree off the rocket's target. The satellites will not need to use extra propellant loaded into their fuel tanks to correct a potential orbit injection error. All six satellites were deployed as planned, all antenna and solar panels have been deployed as designed.
     The OG-2 join 25 operational OG-1, launched more than 15 years ago and which have operated years longer than designed, and plus a pair of small ship-tracking spacecraft used by Orbcomm. The company anticipates launching the remaining eleven OG2 by the end of 2014 to complete its next generation constellation. 
     The launch was part of a $42.6 million two-launch contract package purchased by Orbcomm at a discount from SpaceX's advertised Falcon 9 launch prices. Total contract value for the 18 spacecraft was $117 million and Orbcomm officials say the company's investment in the second-generation satellite fleet is worth approximately $230 million. (The company has an option to purchase up to 30 additional OG2 satellites.) Built by Sierra Nevada Corp., OG-2 are designed for a 10-year lifetime.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Orbcomm's 14 Jul 14NSSDC's 2014-041C ; Gunter's Orbcomme OG-1 to 18 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Orbcomm OG2-11 / Orbcomm FM111
Spacecraft: Orbcomm FM50 / Orbcomm FM103
Chronologies: 2014 payload #153 ; 2014-40D ; 7,627th spacecraft, 40,089th space object.
Type: Communications (Mobile Services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbcomm
Launch: 14 July 2014 at 15h15 UT, from Cape Caneveral Air Froce Station's LC-40, by a Falcon 9 v1.1.
Orbit:
Mission: OG-2 (Orbcomm generation 2) are 172-kg communications satellites which provide machine-to-machine (M2M) data transmission to track, monitor and control mobile and fixed assets in commercial transportation, heavy equipment, industrial fixed assets, marine and homeland security. Each satellite is equipped with an enhanced communications payload designed to increase subscriber capacity by up to 12 times over the current OG-1 satellites. Customers are able to transmit data at greater speeds and send larger data packets. The satellites are also equipped with an Automatic Identification System (AIS) payload to receive and report transmissions from AIS-equipped vessels for ship tracking and other maritime navigational and safety efforts. 
     The Falcon 9 rocket placed the six Orbcomm in an orbit just a half-kilometer off prelaunch predictions and an inclination five one-thousandths of a degree off the rocket's target. The satellites will not need to use extra propellant loaded into their fuel tanks to correct a potential orbit injection error. All six satellites were deployed as planned, all antenna and solar panels have been deployed as designed.
     The OG-2 join 25 operational OG-1, launched more than 15 years ago and which have operated years longer than designed, and plus a pair of small ship-tracking spacecraft used by Orbcomm. The company anticipates launching the remaining eleven OG2 by the end of 2014 to complete its next generation constellation. 
     The launch was part of a $42.6 million two-launch contract package purchased by Orbcomm at a discount from SpaceX's advertised Falcon 9 launch prices. Total contract value for the 18 spacecraft was $117 million and Orbcomm officials say the company's investment in the second-generation satellite fleet is worth approximately $230 million. (The company has an option to purchase up to 30 additional OG2 satellites.) Built by Sierra Nevada Corp., OG-2 are designed for a 10-year lifetime.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Orbcomm's 14 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-040F ; Gunter's Orbcomme OG-1 to 18 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Orbcomm OG2-4 / Orbcomm FM104
Spacecraft: Orbcomm FM46 / Orbcomm FM107
Chronologies: 2014 payload #154 ; 2014-40E ; 7,623rd spacecraft, 40,090th space object.
Type: Communications (Mobile Services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbcomm
Launch: 14 July 2014 at 15h15 UT, from Cape Caneveral Air Froce Station's LC-40, by a Falcon 9 v1.1.
Orbit:
Mission: OG-2 (Orbcomm generation 2) are 172-kg communications satellites which provide machine-to-machine (M2M) data transmission to track, monitor and control mobile and fixed assets in commercial transportation, heavy equipment, industrial fixed assets, marine and homeland security. Each satellite is equipped with an enhanced communications payload designed to increase subscriber capacity by up to 12 times over the current OG-1 satellites. Customers are able to transmit data at greater speeds and send larger data packets. The satellites are also equipped with an Automatic Identification System (AIS) payload to receive and report transmissions from AIS-equipped vessels for ship tracking and other maritime navigational and safety efforts. 
     The Falcon 9 rocket placed the six Orbcomm in an orbit just a half-kilometer off prelaunch predictions and an inclination five one-thousandths of a degree off the rocket's target. The satellites will not need to use extra propellant loaded into their fuel tanks to correct a potential orbit injection error. All six satellites were deployed as planned, all antenna and solar panels have been deployed as designed.
     The OG-2 join 25 operational OG-1, launched more than 15 years ago and which have operated years longer than designed, and plus a pair of small ship-tracking spacecraft used by Orbcomm. The company anticipates launching the remaining eleven OG2 by the end of 2014 to complete its next generation constellation. 
     The launch was part of a $42.6 million two-launch contract package purchased by Orbcomm at a discount from SpaceX's advertised Falcon 9 launch prices. Total contract value for the 18 spacecraft was $117 million and Orbcomm officials say the company's investment in the second-generation satellite fleet is worth approximately $230 million. (The company has an option to purchase up to 30 additional OG2 satellites.) Built by Sierra Nevada Corp., OG-2 are designed for a 10-year lifetime.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Orbcomm's 14 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-040B ; Gunter's Orbcomme OG-1 to 18 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014;
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Orbcomm OG2-3 / Orbcomm FM103
Spacecraft: Orbcomm FM45 / Orbcomm FM109
OG-2 stands for “Orbcomm Generation 2”
Chronologies: 2014 payload #155 ; 2014-40F ; 7,622nd spacecraft, 40,091st space object.
Type: Communications (Mobile Services)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbcomm
Launch: 14 July 2014 at 15h15 UT, from Cape Caneveral Air Froce Station's LC-40, by a Falcon 9 v1.1.
Orbit: 619.5 km x 740.5 km x 47g 
Mission: OG-2 (Orbcomm generation 2) are 172-kg communications satellites which provide machine-to-machine (M2M) data transmission to track, monitor and control mobile and fixed assets in commercial transportation, heavy equipment, industrial fixed assets, marine and homeland security. Each satellite is equipped with an enhanced communications payload designed to increase subscriber capacity by up to 12 times over the current OG-1 satellites. Customers are able to transmit data at greater speeds and send larger data packets. The satellites are also equipped with an Automatic Identification System (AIS) payload to receive and report transmissions from AIS-equipped vessels for ship tracking and other maritime navigational and safety efforts. 
     The Falcon 9 rocket placed the six Orbcomm in an orbit just a half-kilometer off prelaunch predictions and an inclination five one-thousandths of a degree off the rocket's target. The satellites will not need to use extra propellant loaded into their fuel tanks to correct a potential orbit injection error. All six satellites were deployed as planned, all antenna and solar panels have been deployed as designed.
     The OG-2 join 25 operational OG-1, launched more than 15 years ago and which have operated years longer than designed, and plus a pair of small ship-tracking spacecraft used by Orbcomm. The company anticipates launching the remaining eleven OG2 by the end of 2014 to complete its next generation constellation. 
     The launch was part of a $42.6 million two-launch contract package purchased by Orbcomm at a discount from SpaceX's advertised Falcon 9 launch prices. Total contract value for the 18 spacecraft was $117 million and Orbcomm officials say the company's investment in the second-generation satellite fleet is worth approximately $230 million. (The company has an option to purchase up to 30 additional OG2 satellites.) Built by Sierra Nevada Corp., OG-2 are designed for a 10-year lifetime.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Orbcomm's 14 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-040A ; Gunter's Orbcomme OG-1 to 18 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Foton-M 4
Spacecraft: Foton-M 34KSM No. 1
Chronologies: 2014 payload #156 ; 2014-41A ; 7,628th spacecraft, 40,095th space object.
Type: Biology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 18 July 2014 at 20h50 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodroem's LC-31, by a Soyuz-2.1a.
Orbit:
Recovered: 1 September 2014 at ~9h18 UT.
Mission: Foton-M4 is a 6.8 tonnes, a joint Russian-German biological satellite which hosts 22 experiments supplied by Russian and German institutions probing questions in biological and materials sciences. It carries five Gecko lizards and several Drosophilae flies, as well as a number of plant seeds and microbes. it carries 22 sets of scientific instruments weighting 850 kilograms.  ITAR-TASS reports that the satellite will be placed into a 575 kilometers-high orbit “for a two-month period and in 6 days the spacecraft will land in Russia’s Orenburg region.”
      Researchers monitors the effects of microgravity on the adult geckos, including their sexual behavior and embryonic development, The gecko habitat aboard the spacecraft wass continually video recordied. The news agency also reports that “the lizards are perfect for such experiments, as they provide the scientists with the information regarding bones’ demineralization in space. These reptiles stick to any type of surface thanks to the special microscopic hooks on its legs, so the gravity hardly affects them. Moreover, researchers are able to use geckos in space experiments with minimal food and oxygen supplies due to the lizards’ specific metabolism.” 
    The mission alsy study the growth of semiconductor crystals in microgravity is order to produce crystals with the highest possible quality, Three types of materials will be melt. Dried seeds and silkworm eggs studied to determine their response to cosmic radiation as well as several experiments 
for research into microbes.
     The re-entry capsule, which will return to Earth after a 50-day flight, is based on the 1960s Vostok spacecraft. Roscosmos says landing in southern Russia is scheduled for September. 
     Meanwhile, following orbital insertion, ground controllers were unable to send command to the Foton-M. Connection was lost with the biosatellite after it had made several orbit revolutions, reports Mission Control Centre. “We currently receive telemetric data from Foton, however, we cannot transmit commands from the Earth to the satellite so far,“ reports MCC. “We have only one-way connection. Experts are now trying to restore the communication.”  However, telemetric information coming from the spacecraft indicates that all onboard systems “function in strict compliance with the operating logic.”  Specialists are restoring stable connection with Foton and are providing for fulfillment of planned orbital mission program.
     The spacecraft was supposed to fire its on-board propulsion system to boost its altitude shortly after its launch, but the burn never occurred. The maneuver would have put Foton M4 in a circular orbit at about 575 kilometers, but radar tracking data from the U.S. Air Force indicates it is in an elliptical orbit with a perigee of only 250 kilometers. It is not clear how long the spacecraft could remain at such an altitude.
     The Photon-M descent capsule No. 4 landed in the Orenburg Region, Russia, on 1st September 2014 at around 9:18 UT, completing a 46 days, 12 hours and 28 minutes flight.  All geckos, which were carried in the capsule, died, Russian space agency official said the fruit flies “got through the flight quite well, grew and bred.”
     All geckos died a week before the landing, officials at the Institute of Medical and Biological Problems said: “We can say with confidence that they died at last a week before the landing because their bodies were partly mummified.”  He also adds: “Hypothermia is not the main possible cause but only one of the options. Others include a possible malfunction of the onboard equipment and life-support system,”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701, 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS'13 Jan 14, 24 July 14, 24 July 14 ; 5 May 14, 18 Jul 14, 30 Jul 14, 1 Aug 14, 27 Aug 14, 1 Sep 14, 1 Sep 14, 1 Sep 14, 1 Sep 14, 2 Sep 14, 3 Sep 14, 3 Sep 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-041A ; Gunter's Fotom-M ; CelesTrak's Search=2014;
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Progress M-24M / ISS-56P
Spacecraft: Progress 7K-TGM No. 423
Chronologies: 2014 payload #157 ; 2014-42A ; 7,629th spacecraft, 40,097th space object.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 23 July 2014 at 21h45 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyux-U.
Orbit: Docked at the International Space Station.
De-orbited 19 November 2014.
Mission: Progress M-24M is a cargo freighter which brings 2.6 tons of food, fuel and supplies to the International Space Station, including some 800 kg of propellant, 420 kg of water, 27 kg of air and 22 kg of oxygen, plus 1,320 kg of supplies, spare parts and experiment hardware packed inside its pressurized logistics module.  It docked to the Pirs module on 24 July 2014 at 3h31 UT and will remain attached to the space station until 27 October 2014. The mission marks the 56th Progress logistics flight to the space station since 2000, giving it the name Progress 56P and is also the 151st flight bound to ISS since the first component of the complex lifted off in November 1998. Progress M-24M undocked from Pirs on 27 October 2014 at 5h38 UT.  Then, between 27 October and 20 November, It took part in an experimentto study the possibility of transmitting optical signals to carry out the researches on the changes of the Earth’s atmosphere. The craf was de-orbited on 19 November 2014 at 20:00 UT.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701, 704 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 21 Jul 14, 24 Jll 14, 24 Jul 14, 24 Jul 14, 27 Oct 14, 20 Nov 14 ; RSC Energia's Photos Reports ; NSSDC's 2014-042A ; Gunter's Progress M=24M ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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GSSAP 1 (USA 253)
Spacecraft: AFSPC-4 F1
GSSAP stands for Geosynchronous Space Situational Awareness Program,
Chronologies: 2014 payload #158 ; 2014-43A ; 7,630th spacecraft, 40,099th space object.
Type: Space Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 28 July 2014 at 23h28 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-37B, by a Delta 4M+(4,2).
Orbit:
Mission: GSSAP will fly one satellite just below and its twin just above the geosynchronous satellite belt to  survey objects in the GEO belt and allow us both to track known objects and debris and to monitor potential threats .  Officialy, the GSSAP will “contribute to timely and accurate orbital predictions, enhancing our knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit environment and further enabling spaceflight safety to include satellite collision avoidance.” Geostationary orbit  is where the U.S. military operates a number of critical communications, missile warning and reconnaissance platforms, .
Notes: This launch marks the 368th Delta rocket launch since 1960, the 27th Delta 4 rocket mission since 2002 and the 85th United Launch Alliance mission since 2006.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 700 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-043A ; Gunter'sGSSAP ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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GSSAP 2 (USA 254)
Spacecraft: AFSPC-4 F2
GSSAP stands for Geosynchronous Space Situational Awareness Program,
Chronologies: 2014 payload #159 ; 2014-43B ; 7,631st spacecraft, 40,100th space object.
Type: Space Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 28 July 2014 at 23h28 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-37B, by a Delta 4M+(4,2).
Orbit:
Mission: GSSAP will fly one satellite just below and its twin just above the geosynchronous satellite belt to  survey objects in the GEO belt and allow us both to track known objects and debris and to monitor potential threats .  Officialy, the GSSAP will “contribute to timely and accurate orbital predictions, enhancing our knowledge of the geosynchronous orbit environment and further enabling spaceflight safety to include satellite collision avoidance.” Geostationary orbit  is where the U.S. military operates a number of critical communications, missile warning and reconnaissance platforms, .
Notes: This launch marks the 368th Delta rocket launch since 1960, the 27th Delta 4 rocket mission since 2002 and the 85th United Launch Alliance mission since 2006.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 700 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-043B ; Gunter's GSSAPL ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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ANGELS (USA 255)
Spacecraft: GSSAP stands for Geosynchronous Space Situational Awareness Program,
Chronologies: 2014 payload #160 ; 2014-43C ; 7,632nd spacecraft 40,101st space object.
Type: Space Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 28 July 2014 at 23h28 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-37B, by a Delta 4M+(4,2).
Orbit:
Mission: ANGELS, will fly above the GPS constellation but use those positioning signals to test maneuverability around the spent Delta 4 upper stage. It's also equipped with a space situational awareness sensor payload "to evaluate techniques for detection, tracking and characterizing of space objects, as well as, attribution of actions in space,
Notes: This launch marks the 368th Delta rocket launch since 1960, the 27th Delta 4 rocket mission since 2002 and the 85th United Launch Alliance mission since 2006.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 700 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-043C ; Gunter's ANGEL ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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ATV-5 Georges Lemaître
Spacecraft: ATV stands for Automated Transfer Vehicle.  ATV-5 is named after the famous  Belgian physicist Georges Lemaitre who first proposed the Big Bang theory.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #161 ; 2014-44A ; 7,633rd spacecraft 40,103rd space object.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ESA / European Space Agency
Launch: 29 July 2014 at 23h48 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ES.
Orbit: Docked to the Internaional Space Station.
Mission: ATV-5 is a 20-tons cargo transport craft that haul 7.3 tons of fuel, food and supplies to the International Space Station. The ATV is the biggest spaceship of its ing and ATV-5 is the heaviest ever launched by an European launcher. It was named by ESA "George Lemaitre" in honor of the 20th century Belgian astronomer and physicist credited with proposing the theory of the expansion  of the universe.
     The cargo carried includes 860 kg of propellant, 845 kg of fresh water, 100 kg of oxygen and about 2,700 kg of dry cargo, which includes hardware for European, Japanese and U.S. investigations ongoing inside the outpost. The largest piece of hardware carried by ATV 5 is an electromagnetic levitator for ESA's Material Science Laboratory inside the Columbus module. The device will melt down metallic samples for research in material thermodynamics. ATV-5 is the fifth and last in a line of European Space Agency cargo spacecraft built to service the space station.
     After a series of orbital maneuvers and tests, the ATV will approach the space station Aug. 12 for an automatic, laser-guided docking to the Russian Zvezda service module. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 700 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NASA News Release ; NSSDC's 2014-044A ; Gunter's ATV-5 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Navstar 67 (USA 256)
Spacecraft: Navstar SVN-68 / GPS 2F-7 / 'Capella'
Chronologies: 2014 payload #162 ; 2014-45A ; 7,634th spacecraft, 40,105th space object.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 2 August 2014 at 3h23 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-41, by an Atlas V 401.
Orbit:
Mission: Navstar 71, or GPS IIF-7, is a 1,630-kg navigation satellite, the 71st craft in the Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) program. It took Plane F’s Slot 3 of the constellation, replacing Navstar 43, launched in 1997, that will be maneuver to replace Navstar 29 launched in 1992.  The GPS fleet features six orbital planes with at least four spacecraft in each grouping to generate the minimum 24-satellites needed for the network to function properly. The current constellation is comprised of six GPS 2A satellites, a dozen GPS 2Rs, seven 2R-Ms and six GPS 2Fs.  This was the seventh of 12 Boeing-built Block 2F spacecraft being manufactured and is valued at $245 million and has a 15-year desing life (although, historically, Navstar spacecraft has a much longuer life).
     "The continuous navigation signals emitted by GPS satellites allow users to find their position in latitude, longitude and altitude and measure time.  Measurements collected simultaneously from four satellites are processed to establish the three dimensions of position, velocity and time. Users can determine their location to within less than a meter, speed within a fraction of a kilometer per hour and time to within a second. 
     GPS satellites are used primarily by U.S. armed forces and by civilians around the world. “Everyone in the room I am going to guess has been touched by GPS today in one way or another,” said Air Force Space Command leader William Shelton. “Your smartphone, financial transaction, high-speed network you may have used that uses GPS timing. It literally serves the world.”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 700 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-045A ; Gunter's GPS-2F ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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AsiaSat 8
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #163 ; 2014-46A ; 7,635th spacecraft, 40,107th space object.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: AsiaSat (Asia Satellite Telecommunications Company
Limited)
Launch: 5 August 2014 at 8h00 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-40, by a Falcon 9 v1.1.
Orbit: Geostationary at 105.5° East longitude.
Mission: AsiaSat 8 is a 4,535-kg communications satellite equipped with 24 Ku-band and 1 Ka-band transponders to provide direct-to-home (DTH), data broadcasting and mobile services in China, India, the Middle East and South East Asia. The craft is co-located with AsiaSat 7. It is a Space Systems/Loral 1300 series satellite which has a design life of 15 years. With AsiaSat 6 and AsiaSat 8 starting service in 2014, and AsiaSat 9 planned for launch in2017, AsiaSat will be focusing on meeting customers’ needs, present and future.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 700 ; Spaceflight Now's StoriesStories ; AsiaSat's 5 Aug 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-046A ; Gunter's AsiaSat 8 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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YW-20 / Yaogan 20
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #164 ; 2014-47A ; 7,636th spacecraft, 40,109th space object.
Type: Signal Intelligence
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China's People Liberaton Army
Launch: 9 August 2014 at 5h45 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4C.
Orbit: 1,086 km x 1,103 km x 63.4°
Mission: According to Chinese medias, China sent one remote-sensing satellite into orbit: “The Yaogan XX satellite will be used to conduct scientific experiments, carry out land surveys, monitor crop yields and aid in preventing and reducing natural disasters.”  But NORAD tracking data detected three satellites and the use of the Chang Zheng 4C rocket, the Jiuquan launch site and the detection of three spacecraft in orbit follows a pattern established on the previous launches of Yaogan 9, Yaogan 16 and Yaogan 17. Western analysts believe the triplets have a naval surveillance mission.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 700 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; China Daily's 9 Aug 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-047A ; Gunter's Yaogan 9, 16, 17, 20 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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YW-20A / Yaogan 20 subsat 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #165 ; 2014-47B ; 7,637th spacecraft, 40,110th space object.
Type: Signal Intelligence
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China's People Liberaton Army
Launch: 9 August 2014 at 5h45 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4C.
Orbit: 1,086 km x 1,103 km x 63.4°
Mission: According to Chinese medias, China sent one remote-sensing satellite into orbit: “The Yaogan XX satellite will be used to conduct scientific experiments, carry out land surveys, monitor crop yields and aid in preventing and reducing natural disasters.”  But NORAD tracking data detected three satellites and the use of the Chang Zheng 4C rocket, the Jiuquan launch site and the detection of three spacecraft in orbit follows a pattern established on the previous launches of Yaogan 9, Yaogan 16 and Yaogan 17. Western analysts believe the triplets have a naval surveillance mission.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 700 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; China Daily's 9 Aug 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-047B ; Gunter's Yaogan 9, 16, 17, 20 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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YW-20B / Yaogan 20 subsat 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #166 ; 2014-47B ; 7,638th spacecraft, 40,111th space object.
Type: Signal Intelligence
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China's People Liberaton Army
Launch: 9 August 2014 at 5h45 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4C.
Orbit: 1,086 km x 1,103 km x 63.4°
Mission: According to Chinese medias, China sent one remote-sensing satellite into orbit: “The Yaogan XX satellite will be used to conduct scientific experiments, carry out land surveys, monitor crop yields and aid in preventing and reducing natural disasters.”  But NORAD tracking data detected three satellites and the use of the Chang Zheng 4C rocket, the Jiuquan launch site and the detection of three spacecraft in orbit follows a pattern established on the previous launches of Yaogan 9, Yaogan 16 and Yaogan 17. Western analysts believe the triplets have a naval surveillance mission.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 700 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; China Daily's 9 Aug 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-047C ; Gunter's Yaogan 9, 16, 17, 20 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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WorldView 3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #167 ; 2014-48A ; 7,639th spacecraft, 40,115th space object.
Type: Earth-remote Seising
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: DigitalGlobe 
Launch: 13 August 2014 at 18h30 UT, from Vandenberg Air Force Station's SLC-3E, by an Atlas V 401.
Orbit: 612 km x 614 km x 98.0°
Mission: WorldView 3 is a 2,800-kg commercial Earth-remote sensing satellite designed to photograph objects as small as 30 cm. Its sensors can image in black and white and color, plus short-wave infrared to see through smoke and haze for disaster response and has an atmospheric sounder for enhanced color calibration (which helps better ascertain crop health).  Market ranges from the U.S. government to agriculture, oil and gas, scientific researchers and land developers. The craft stands 5.7 meters tall and 7 metres across with its solar panels deployed, and it carries a 1.1 meter aperture telescope. Built by Ball Aerospace, it has a design life of 7 years but has an expected service life of 10-12 years.
      Digital Globe was formerly EarthWatch Inc, and merged with the former Space Imaging Inc. (GeoEye) in 2012, which itself absorbed EOSAT in 1996 and OrbImage in 2006, completing the consolidation of the first generation of US commercial imaging companies. (See Jonathan McDowell's list of Digital Globe satellites.)
Notes: This launch marks the 10th commercial Atlas 5 launch. It is the 630th for an Atlas vehicle, the 196th Atlas-Centaur, the 48th Atlas 5 rocket and the 24th to fly in the 401 configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solids and a single-engine Centaur. For United Launch Alliance, it is the company's 87th launch overall since 2006 and the 10th just this year. 
The Atlas 5's Centaur stage used up its extra propellant to accelerate into solar orbit.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-048A ; Gunter's WorldVies 2, 3 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Chasqui 1
Spacecraft: "Chasqui" means messenger in the language of Peruvian Indians.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #168 ; 1998-67ET ; 7,640th spacecraft, 40,117th space object.
Type:
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Peru's Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria
Launch: Launched onboard Progress M-22M on 5 February 2014 at 16h23 UT and deployed from ISS (during an EVA) on 17 August 2014 at 14h23 UT.
Orbit:
Mission: Chasqui 1 is a 1-kg nanosatellite developed by the students of the Russian city of Kursk and Peru over a period of three years. Various information has been threaded into the satellite's memory. It includes children's drawings which, as a message to extraterrestrial civilisations, will be broadcast into the open space. A special antenna will be receiving telemetric data fed into the memory of the Chasqui-1. The satellite is equipped with a compact visible and infrared camera system, a radio transmitter and an attitude control system.  It will be monitored daily in four sessions a day for six months. The satellite was built by the Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria in Lima and the Yugo-Zapadniy gosudarstvenniy universitet (Southwest State University) in Kursk.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 18 Aug 14 ; Gunter's Chasqui 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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GF-2 / Gaofen 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #169 ; 2014-49A ; 7,641st spacecraft, 40,118th space object.
Type: Earth-remote sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 19 August 2014 at 3h15 UT, from Tayuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zneng 4B.
Orbit: 608 km x 631 km x 98.0°
Mission: Gaofen 2 is an Earth-remoe sensing satellite, “China's most advanced high-definition Earth observation satellite”, able to see a one-meter object in full color. The satellite is used for geographic and resources surveys, environment and climate change monitoring, precision agriculture, disaster relief and city planning. In panchromatic mode, it achieves a ground resolution of 80 cm with a swath of 48 km. In multispectral mode, it reaches a resolution of 3.2 m. The satellite is based on the CS-L3000A bus.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; China Daily's 19 Aug 14, 19 Aug 14 ; Xinhua's 21 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-049AGunter's GF-2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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BRITE-PL 2
Spacecraft: BRITE-PL stands for BRIght-star Target Explorer – Poland.
(CanX 3D, Heweliusz)
BRITE-P2 is named after astronomer Jan Heweliusz (aka Jan Howelcke) (1611-1687).
Chronologies: 2014 payload #170 ; 2014-49B ; 7,642nd spacecraft, 40,119th space object.
Type: Astronomy
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Poland
Launch: 19 August 2014 at 3h15 UT, from Tayuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zneng 4B.
Orbit: 608 km x 631 km x 98.0°
Mission: BRITE-PL is a 10-kg astronomical satellite which make photometric observations of some of the brightest stars in the sky in order to examine these stars for variability. The observations is to have a precision at least 10 times better than achievable using ground-based observations. The mission is sponsored by the Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences and the Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Centre in collaboration with the University of Toronto, which specializes in developing and manufacturing such small satellites. This is the sixth and final member of the initially planned BRITE constellation.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; China Daily's 19 Aug 14, 19 Aug 14 ; Xinhua's 21 Jul 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-049B ; Gunter's GF-2, BRITE-PL-2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Flock 1b-24
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #171 ; 1998-67EU ; 7,643rd spacecraft, 40,122nd space object.
Type: Earth-remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-2 on 13 July 2014 at 16h52 UT and deployed from ISS on 19 August 2014 at 18h25 UT.
Orbit:
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived 400-km orbit with an inclination of 52°.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NASA News Releases ; Gunter's Flock 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Flock 1b-23
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #172 ; 1998-67EV ; 7,644th spacecraft, 40,123rd space object.
Type: Earth-remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-2 on 13 July 2014 at 16h52 UT and deployed from ISS on 19 August 2014 at 18h25 UT.
Orbit:
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived 400-km orbit with an inclination of 52°.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NASA News Releases ; Gunter's Flock 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Flock 1b-26
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #173 ; 1998-67EW ; 7,645th spacecraft, 40,124th space object.
Type: Earth-remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-2 on 13 July 2014 at 16h52 UT and deployed from ISS on 20 August 2014 at 2h26 UT.
Orbit:
Reentreu: 14 December 2014.
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived 400-km orbit with an inclination of 52°.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NASA News Releases ; Gunter's Flock 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Flock 1b-25
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #174 ; 1998-67EX ; 7,646th spacecraft, 40,125th space object.
Type: Earth-remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-2 on 13 July 2014 at 16h52 UT and deployed from ISS on 20 August 2014 at 2h26 UT.
Orbit:
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived 400-km orbit with an inclination of 52°.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NASA News Releases ; Gunter's Flock 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Flock 1b-15
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #175 ; 1998-67EY ; 7,647th spacecraft, 40,126th space object.
Type: Earth-remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-2 on 13 July 2014 at 16h52 UT and deployed from ISS on 20 August 2014 at 9h50 UT.
Orbit:
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived 400-km orbit with an inclination of 52°.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ;NASA News Releases ; Gunter's Flock 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Flock 1b-16
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #176 ; 1998-67EZ ; 7,648th spacecraft, 40,127th space object.
Type: Earth-remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-2 on 13 July 2014 at 16h52 UT and deployed from ISS on 20 August 2014 at 9h50 UT.
Orbit:
Reentry: 13 December 2014.
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived 400-km orbit with an inclination of 52°.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NASA News Releases ; Gunter's Flock 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Flock 1b-1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #177 ; 1998-67FA ; 7,649th spacecraft, 40,131st space object.
Type: Earth-remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-2 on 13 July 2014 at 16h52 UT and deployed from ISS on 21 August 2014 at 13h37 UT.
Orbit:
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived 400-km orbit with an inclination of 52°.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NASA News Releases ; Gunter's Flock 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Flock 1b-2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #178 ; 1998-67FB ; 7,650th spacecraft, 40,132nd space object.
Type: Earth-remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-2 on 13 July 2014 at 16h52 UT and deployed from ISS on 21 August 2014 at 13h37 UT.
Orbit:
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived 400-km orbit with an inclination of 52°.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NASA News Releases ; Gunter's Flock 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Galileo-FOC FM1
Spacecraft: FOC stands for Full Operational Capability
(Seventh satellite of the Galileo program.)
Galileo FM01 is also called GalileoSat-5, GSAT-0201, and Doresa
Chronologies: 2014 payload #179 ; 2014-50A ; 7,651st spacecraft, 40,128th space object.
Type: Navigtion
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ESA for European Commission
 
Launch: 22 August 2014 at 12h27 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELS, by a Soyuz-STB Fregat-MT.
Orbit: Targeted orbit: circular with a semi-major axis of 29,900 kilometers, inclined at 55°
Actual orbit: elliptical with a semi-major axis of 26,200 km, inclined at 49.8°

Targeted orbit: circular at 23,522 km x 55°
Actual orbit: 13,700 km x 25,900 km x 49.8°

Mission: Galileo FM01 is a 733-kg (660 kg dry) navigation satellite, one of the first two Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. These satellites carry two rubidium and two hydrogen maser atomic clocks and broadcast on L-band.  They also carry the MEOSAR search and rescue transponder payload. They are built by OHB (Bremen) with navigation payloads by SSTL (Guildford). The earlier IOV test satellites were partly owned by ESA, but the FOC satellites are owned by the European Union's GSA (Global Navigation Satellite Systems Agency).
     The spacecraft were placed in a wrong orbit. As planned, the Fregat upper stage made its first burn to put both satellites into in elliptical transfer orbit and then made a second burn intended to circularize the orbit at 23,500 km, inclined at 55.0 degrees. Unfortunately, the orbit was 13,700 km x 25,900 km, inclined at 49.7 degres, more elliptical than planned and with the wrong orbital inclination. 
     Russian officials report that the failure of the Fregat stage was caused when a cryogenic helium line installed too close to a hydrazine propellant supply line caused the hydrazine to freeze. The root cause was a design error, not a quality control error.
     In December 2014, it was reported that this Galileo satellite was finally placed into a usefull orbit and is ‘recovering’.  See ESA News Release of 3 December 2014.
Notes: The Galileo satellites, which has a 12-year lifetimes, are built by OHB in Germany while its navigation payloads are manufactured by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd in the UK. The satellites also host search-and-rescue antennas to receive distress signals worldwide to provide location with an accuracy of 3 meters.
     The objective of the $7.2 billion Galileo program, which is run by the European Commission with support from the European Space Agency, is to develop and deploy a navigation system independent of the U.S. military's fleet of GPS satellites Iwhich could be shut down at the order of the Pentagon). The Galileo system is designed to be interoperable with GPS and Russia's Glonass navigation satellites.
     These new satellites was to had joined four Galileo already in orbit, launched in October 2011 and October 2012 respectively,  These four were ‘In-Orbit Validation’ satellites, serving to demonstrate the Galileo system would function as planned.  Officials are pleased with the performance of the four existing satellites, which will be integrated into the operational Galileo constellation.  The network needs 24 satellites to be fully operational. Twenty more Galileo satellites are being assembled to be launch before the end of 2017 (as planned before the FM01/02 accident). With a full complement of spare spacecraft in orbit, the fleet will be consist of 30 satellites.
     The definition, development and In-Orbit Validation phases of the Galileo programme were carried out by ESA and co-funded by ESA and the EU.  The Full Operational Capability phase is managed and fully funded by the European Commission. ESA acts as design and procurement agent on behalf of the Commission. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701, 703 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAS-TASS' 8 Aug 14, 21 Aug 14, 23 Aug 14, 25 Aug 14, 26 Aug 14 ; ESA's 18 Aug 14, 21 Aug 14, 23 Aug 14, 26 Aug 14 ; Arianespace's 22 Aug 14, 22 Aug 14, 23 Aug 14, 23 Aug 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-050A ; Gunter's Galileo FOC ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Galileo-FOC FM2
Spacecraft: FOC stands for Full Operational Capability
(Eight satellite of the Galileo program.)
Galileo FM02 is also called GalileoSat-6, GSAT-0202, and Milena
Chronologies: 2014 payload #180 ; 2014-50B ; 7,652nd spacecraft, 40,129th space object.
Type: Navigtion
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ESA for European Commission
Launch: 22 August 2014 at 12h27 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELS, by a Soyuz-STB Fregat-MT.
Orbit: Targeted orbit: circular with a semi-major axis of 29,900 kilometers, inclined at 55°
Actual orbit: elliptical with a semi-major axis of 26,200 km, inclined at 49.8°

Targeted orbit: circular at 23,522 km x 55°
Actual orbit: 13,700 km x 25,900 km x 49.8°

Mission: Galileo FM02 is a 733-kg (660 kg dry) navigation satellite, one of the first two Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. These satellites carry two rubidium and two hydrogen maser atomic clocks and broadcast on L-band.  They also carry the MEOSAR search and rescue transponder payload. They are built by OHB (Bremen) with navigation payloads by SSTL (Guildford). The earlier IOV test satellites were partly owned by ESA, but the FOC satellites are owned by the European Union's GSA (Global Navigation Satellite Systems Agency).
     The spacecraft were placed in a wrong orbit. As planned, the Fregat upper stage made its first burn to put both satellites into in elliptical transfer orbit and then made a second burn intended to circularize the orbit at 23,500 km, inclined at 55.0 degrees. Unfortunately, the orbit was 13,700 km x 25,900 km, inclined at 49.7 degres, more elliptical than planned and with the wrong orbital inclination. 
     Russian officials report that the failure of the Fregat stage was caused when a cryogenic helium line installed too close to a hydrazine propellant supply line caused the hydrazine to freeze. The root cause was a design error, not a quality control error.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701, 703 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAS-TASS' 8 Aug 14, 21 Aug 14, 23 Aug 14, 25 Aug 14, 26 Aug 14 ; ESA's 18 Aug 14, 21 Aug 14, 23 Aug 14, 26 Aug 14 ; Arianespace's 22 Aug 14, 22 Aug 14, 23 Aug 14, 23 Aug 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-050B ; Gunter's Galileo FOC ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Flock 1b-8
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #181 ; 1998-67FC ; 7,654th spacecraft, 40,133rd space object.
Type: Earth-remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-2 on 13 July 2014 at 16h52 UT and deployed from ISS on 23 August 2014 at 19h44 UT.
Orbit:
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived 400-km orbit with an inclination of 52°.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NASA News Releases ; Gunter's Flock 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Flock 1b-7
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #182 ; 1998-67FD ; 7,653rd spacecraft, 40,134th space object.
Type: Earth-remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-2 on 13 July 2014 at 16h52 UT and deployed from ISS on 23 August 2014 at 19h44 UT.
Orbit:
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived 400-km orbit with an inclination of 52°.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NASA News Releases ; Gunter's Flock 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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LQ / Ling Qiao
Spacecraft: Ling Qiao means smart communications test satellite.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #183 ; 2014-51A ; 7,656th spacecraft, 40,136th space object.
Type: Technology (Communications)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 4 September 2014 at 0h15 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2D.
Orbit: 778 km x 809 km x 98.5°
Mission: Ling Qiao is a 135-kg communications test satellite, a joint venture of Tsinghua University and Xinwei Telecom for tests of multimedia data transmission. Chinese sources report that Ling Qiao is a "smart satellite" to conduct multimedia telecommunications experiments. It is a joint mission managed by Tsinghua University and Beijing Xinwei Telecom Technology Co. Ltd., a Chinese telecom operator.  Xinwei says the spacecraft is the company's first step in exploring the construction of a satellite communications network.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Xinhua's 4 Sep 14, 4 Sep 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-051A ; Gunter's Ling Qiao ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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CX1-04 / Chuangxin 1-04
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #184 ; 2014-51B ; 7,655th spacecraft, 40,137th space object.
Type: Communications (Data Relay)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Chinese Academy of Sciences
Launch: 4 September 2014 at 0h15 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2D.
Orbit: 778 km x 809 km x 98.5°
Mission: Chuangxin-1 04 is a 90-kg satellite for message data relay from the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Chinese sources report that Chuangxin-1-04 is designed to collect and transmit data on hydrology, weather, electric power, and disaster relief.  Developed by the China Academy of Sciences, it designed to gather and transmit data for disaster relief and economic development applications. The craft's mission includes collecting hydrological, meteorological and electric power data.  It follows similar Chuangxin relay satellites launched in 2003, 2008 and 2011. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Xinhua's 4 Sep 14, 4 Sep 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-051B ; Gunter's CX 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Flock 1b-18
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #185 ; 1998-67FE ; 7,658th spacecraft, 40,139th space object.
Type: Earth-remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-2 on 13 July 2014 at 16h52 UT and deployed from ISS on 5 September 2014 at 9h26 UT.
Orbit:
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived 400-km orbit with an inclination of 52°.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NASA News Releases ; Gunter's Flock 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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Flock 1b-17
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #186 ; 1998-67FF ; 7,657th spacecraft, 40,140th space object.
Type: Earth-remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: Launched onboard Cygnus Orb-2 on 13 July 2014 at 16h52 UT and deployed from ISS on 5 September 2014 at 9h26 UT.
Orbit:
Mission: The Flock-1 are 5-kg Earth observing satellites which monitor natural disasters, deforestation, agricultural yields and other environmental changes. They provide imagery with a resolution of 3 to 5 metres and operate in a relative short-lived 400-km orbit with an inclination of 52°.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 701 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NASA News Releases ; Gunter's Flock 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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AsiaSat 6 / Thaicom 7
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #187 ; 2014-52A ; 7,659th spacecraft, 40,141st space object.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: AsiaSat (Asia Satellite Telecommunications Company
Limited)
Launch: 7 September 2014 at 5h00 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-40, by a Falcon 9 v1.1.
Orbit: Geostationary 
Mission: Asiasat 6 is a 3,700-kg (or 4,428-kg?) communications satellite which carries 28 C- and Ku-band to be used in China for video services and other telecommunications and data services and in Southeast Asia. AsiaSat 6 hosts broadcast communications signals through two beams -- a global beam and a regional beam to serve AsiaSat and Thaicom, another satellite operator that negotiated access to up to 50 percent of AsiaSat 6's capacity.  "The purpose of that is to be able to separate the traffic, so we aren't competing with each other in selling and marketing the capacity," said William Wade, AsiaSat's president and CEO. Thaicom's payload is marketed as Thaicom 7. The craft is designed for a 15-year lifetime. The value of Falcon 9/AsiaSat 6 mission is approximately $190 million, including the spacecraft, the launch contract and insurance, AsiaSat is paying SpaceX $52.2 million for the launch.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 702 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-052A ; Gunter's AsiaSat 6 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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YW-21 / Yaogan 21
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #188 ; 2014-53A ; 7,660th spacecraft, 40,143rd space object.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China's People Liberaton Army
Launch: 8 September 2014 at 3h22 UT, from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4B.
Orbit: Circular at about 475 km x 97.4°
Mission: Yaogan 21 is an imaging satellite which continues the series begun with the Zi Yuan 2 satellites. Chinese sources report that Yaogan-21 will be used for scientific experiments, natural resource survey, estimation of crop yield and disaster relief. But  experts say the Yaogan series of satellites likely serve Chinese military authorities with information from optical and radar imaging sensors. Two previous Long March 4B rocket launches from the Taiyuan space base in 2008 and 2011 put up Yaogan satellites in similar orbits.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 702 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; China Daily's 9 Sep 14 ; China Daily's 8 Sep 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-053AGunter's Yaogan 5, 12, 21 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Tiantuo 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #189 ; 2014-53B ; 7,661st spacecraft, 40,144th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China's National University of Defense Technology
Launch: 8 September 2014 at 3h22 UT, from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4B.
Orbit: Circular at about 475 km x 97.4°
Mission: Tiantuo-2 is 67-kg satellite which carries  four video cameras capable of tracking and recording moving targets and sending the data back to the ground in real time. Chinese sources report that the satellite was designed and built by the National University of Defense Technology for “smart satellite experiments.”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 702 ; NSSDC's 2014-053B ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; China Daily's 9 Sep 14 ; China Daily's 8 Sep 14 ; Gunter's TT-2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Optus 10
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #190 ; 2014-54a ; 7,663rd spacecraft, 40,146th space object.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Optus
Launch: 11 September 2014 at 22h05 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary  at 164° East longitude.
Mission: Optus 10 is a 3,270–kg communications satellite which hosts 24 Ku-band transponders   fot direct television broadcasts, Internet, telephone and data transmission services to Australia, New Zealand and the Antarctic region. Built by Space Systems/Loral, it has an expected lifespan of 15 years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 702 ; NSSDC's 2014-054A ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Gunter's Optus 10 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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MEASAT 3b / Jabiru 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #191 ; 2014-54b ; 7,662nd spacecraft, 40,147th space object.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: MEASAT
Launch: 11 September 2014 at 22h05 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 91.5° East longitude.
Mission: Measat 3b is a 5,897–kg communications satellite with 48 Ku-band transponders to broadcast television programming direct-to-home in Malaysia, Indonesia, India and Australia. The craft is part of the capacity is leased to NewSat (Melbourne) to be marketed as the Jabiru-2 payload.  Built by Airbus Defence and Space, it has an expected lifespan of 15 years. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.702  ; NSSDC's 2014-054B; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Gunter's MEASAT 3b ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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CLIO (USA 257)
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #192 ; 2014-55A ; 7,664th spacecraft, 40,208th space object.
Type: Electronic Intelligence?
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. National Reconnaissance Office?
Launch: 17 September 2014 at 0h10 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-41, by an Atlas V 401.
Orbit: Geostationary ?
Mission: CLIO's owner is an unidentified US government agency - possibly the National Reconnaissance Office although nowadays its satellites are normally acknowledged. It may have a communications or signals intelligence payload. The secret spacecraft was probably placed in an unusual high-perigee geostationary transfer orbit, possibly around 11,800 km x 36,000 km.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 702 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-055A ; Gunter's CLIO ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Dragon CRS-4
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #193 ; 2014-56A ; 7,665th spacecraft, 40,210th space object..
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: SpaceX for NASA
Launch: 21 September 2014 at 5h52 UT, from Cape Canveral Air Force Station's LC-40, by a Falcon 9 v1.1.
Orbit: Initial: 203 km x 358 km x 51.6°
Docked to the International Space Station.
Recovered: 25 October 2014.
Mission: CRS-4 is a 10-ton cargo-delivery mission to the International Space Station, the sixth such Dragon cargoship. Dragon’s trunk carries the ISS RapidScat radar scatterometer science instrument and the RapidScat Nadir Adapter, which will be installed on the nadir attach point of the Columbus module's external payload facility. Dragon’s cabin carries SpinSat, an 0.56-meter spherical NRL satellite to be deployed by the Kibo JEM-RMS, and the NASA-Ames Rodent Research 1 life sciences payload with 20 mice. Neither SpaceX nor NASA has revealed the mass of Dragon CRS-4 but it is probably in the 9,500-10,500-kg range. Space Station’s Canadarm2 grappled CRS-4 on 23 September 2014  at 10h52 UT and berthed it to the Harmony node at 13h21 UT.
     The Dragon CRS-4 was unberthed on 25 October 2014 at about 12h02 UT and released by the Canadarm2 at 13h57 UT. It splashed down in the Pacific at 19h38 UT, 425 km west of Baja California. It brought back to Earth 1,485 kg of biological specimens ( including blood, urine samples and plants grown aboard the space station) and hardware.  The craft also brough home mice launched a month ago to test out animal habitats in space and study muscle atrophy in microgravity. (See this NASA News relases.) The Dragon freighter is the only spacecraft capable of returning sizable cargo from the space station back to Earth. The mission lasted 34 days, 13 hours and 49 minutes.
Notes: This Falcon launch marks th 13rd Falcon 9 launch and the 8th such launch within a one-year period. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 702, 703, 704 ; NSSDC's 2014-056A; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Gunter's Dragon ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Soyuz TMA-14M / ISS-40S
Spacecraft: Soyuz 11F732A47 No. 714
Chronologies: 2014 payload #194 ; 2014-57A ; 7,666th spacecraft, 40,246th space object.
Type: Piloted spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 25 September 2014 at 20h25 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz-FG.
Orbit: Docked to the International Space Station.
Mission: Soyuz TMA-14M is a crew transport spaceship which carriied ISS Expedition 41/42 crew to the International Space Station (Alexander Samokoutyayev, Yelena Serova and Barry Wilmore).  (Serova is the fourth Russian woman in space and the first since 1997.) 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 703 ; NSSDC's 2014-057A ; Spaceflight Now's Stories, ISS Expedition 41, ISS Expedition 42 ; ITAT-TASS' 5 Sep 14Gunter's Soyuz-TMA ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Luch / Olimp 1
Spacecraft: Olimp-K
Chronologies: 2014 payload #95 ; 2014-58A ; 7,667th spacecraft, 40,258th space object.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russia (Russian Defense Ministry)
Launch: 27 September 2014 at 20h23 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome'S LC-81/24, by a Protom-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 703 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 5 May 14, 4 Jun 14, 2 Jul 14, 26 Aug 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-058A ; Gunter'sLuch (Olimp-K) ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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SJ-11-07 / Shijian-11-07
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #196 ; 2014-59A ; 7,668th spacecraft, 40,261st space object.
Type: Missile Early Warning
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Chinese People Liberation Army
Launch: 28 September 2014 at 5H13 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2C.
Orbit: 686 km x 705 km x 98.1°
Mission: According to Chinese sources, “The satellite, which was developed by China Spacesat Co. Ltd under the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation, will be used to conduct scientific experiments in space.” But, Aa Jonathan McDowell sais: “This is one of the larger Chinese military satellite constellations and remains mysterious; the speculation that it carries infrared missile warning sensors remains unconfirmed.”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 703 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-059A ; Gunter's SJ-11 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Himawari 8
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #197 ; 2014-60A ; 7,669th spacecraft, 40,267th space object.
Type: Meteorology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Japan's JMA / Japan Meteorological Agency
Launch: 7 October 2014 at 5h16 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's LP-Y, by a H-IIA-202.
Orbit: Geostatonary  at 140° East longitude.
Mission: Himawari 8 is a 3,500-kg meteorological satellite which provides weather data over Asia and the Pacific Ocean. It takes a full picture of East Asia and the Western Pacific every 10 minutes, an improvement over the half-hour update times available with Japan's previous weather satellites. Its main instrument is based on the Advanced Baseline Imager designed for NOAA's GOES R program. This Imager can observe storms in 16 spectral bands - up from five bands on the satellite it is replacing - allowing forecasters to resolve greater detail on the structure and evolution of weather systems. Himawari 8 replaces MTSAT 2 launched in 2006,  It is the first of two new spacecraft built by Mitsubishi Electric Corp. for the Japan Meteorological Agency.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 703 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-060A ; Gunter's Himawari 8, 9 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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IRNSS 1C
Spacecraft: IRNSS stsnds for Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #198 ; 2014-61A ; 7,670th spacecraft, 40,269th space object.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ISRO
Launch: 15 October 2014 at 20h02 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Center's SHAR First Launch Pad, by a PSLV XL.
Orbit: Geostationary at 83° East longitude.
Mission: IRNSS 1C is a 1,425-kg navigation satellite, the third of the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS), a network that will eventually consist of seven satellites by the end of 2015 to broadcast position information to military and civilian users across India and extending up to 1,500 kilometres from the nation's borders.  IRNSS 1C has a 10-year designed lifespan and join IRNSS 1A launched in July 2013 and IRNSS 1B launched last April  A fourth satellite is set for liftoff as soon as December 2014. The Indian navigation system will include three satellites in equatorial geostationary orbits and four in inclined orbits that swing up to 29 degrees north and south of the equator.  Indian officials say their navigation service will aid marine traffic, emergency response officials, vehicle tracking applications, mobile communications mapping, and civilian drivers.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 703 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-061A ; Gunter's IRNSS ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Intelsat IS-30 / DLA-1 
Spacecraft: DLA stands for DirecTV Latin America
Chronologies: 2014 payload #199 ; 2014-60A ; 7,671st spacecraft, 40,271st space object.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Intelsat
Launch: 16 October 2014 at 21h44 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 95° West longitude.
Mission: Intelsat IS-30 is a 6.9-ton communications satellite which provides 72 Ku-band transponders for direct television services and 10 C-band transponders for Intelsat's services in Latin America. DirecTV Latin America is leasing the spacecraft's Ku-band capacity to grow its television broadcasting portfolio in Central and South America and the Caribbean. The spacecraft is co-located with the Galaxy 3C, which is also used by DirecTV Latin America. Manufactured by Space Systems/Loral of Palo Alto, Intelsat IS-30 has a 15-year expected lifespan.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 703 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-062a ; Gunter's Intelsat 30, 31 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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ARSAT 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #200 ; 2014-62B ; 7,672nd spacecraft, 40,272nd space object.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Arsat, Argentina
Launch: 16 October 2014 at 21h44 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 71.8° West longitude.
Mission: Arsat 1 is a 2,985-kg communications satellite which support television broadcasts, data transmission and Internet access for customers in Argentina, Chile, Uruguay and Paraguay.  It is the first geostationary communications satellite built in Argentina. Its operator is Arsat, a national telecom company backed by the government of Argentina and the craft was built by INVAP, an Argentine high-tech contractor. The craft has a designed lifespan of 15 years. The Arsat 1 project reportedly cost about $250 million. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 703 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories; NSSDC's 2014-062B ; Gunter's ARSAT 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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YW-22 / Yaogan 22
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #201 ; 2014-63A ; 7,673rd spacecraft, 40,275th space object.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Chinese People Liberation Army
Launch: 20 October 2014 at 6h31 UT, from Jiuquan Taiyuan Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4C.
Orbit:
Mission: According to Chinese soures this “Earth remote sensing satellite will be used for scientific experiments, natural resource surveying, estimating crop yields and disaster relief.” But Western experts consider this satellite as a military surveillance spacecraft.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 704 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Xinhua's 20 Oct 14 & 20 Oct 14 ; TASS' 20 Oct 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-063A ; Gunter's SJ-11 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Ekspress-AM 6
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #202 ; 2014-64A ; 7,674th spacecraft, 40,277th space object.
Type: Communictions
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Satellite Communications Co.
Launch: 21 October 2014 at 15h10 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/24, by a Proton-M Briz-M (Ph.3).
Orbit: (Geostationary at 53° East longitude.)
Mission: Express-AM 6 is a 3.4-ton communications satellite which carries 72 transponders in C-band, Ku-band, Ka-band and L-band to provide digital television and radio broadcasting, telephone, video conferencing, data transmission and Internet services in Russia. It is also used for mobile communications among government leaders, The satellite's coverage zones include Russian territory, Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. (Russian Satellite Communications Co. is Russia's state civilian telecom satellite operator.) The spacecraft is based on ISS Reshetnev's Express 2000 platgorm and has an expected 15-year lifetime. Russia's Radio Research and Development Institute (NIIR) designed and manufactured the craft's communications payload and Canada's MDA Corp. built the repeater and antennas.
     The final Briz-M burn was incomplete, leaving the satellite in an orbit of 31,307 km x 37,784 km x 0.7° x 1,373 minutres, significantly below the planned orbit.
Notes: The launch mark the 399th Proton rocket launch since 1965 and the 77th Proton M using a Breeze M upper stage since 2001.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 704 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; TASS' 21 Oct 14, 21 Oct 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-064A ; Gunter's Ekspress-AM 6 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Chang'e 5-T1 
Spacecraft: The spacecraft is called Chang'e 5 Flight Test Device.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #203 ; 2014-65A ; 7,675th spacecraft, 40,283th space object.
Type: Planetary probe (Lunar)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 23 October 2014 at 18h00 UT, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3C/G2.
Orbit: Earth-Monn trajectory (with lunars orbits).
Recovered: 31 October 2014 
Mission: This Chinese planetary probe, which has no official name, was an experimental spacecraft to test key technologies designed to be used in Chang'e 5, scheduled to return lunar sample to Earth in 2017. (The mission was unofficially called Chang'e 5 T1, Chang'e 5 Flight Test Vehicle or Reentry Return Flight Test Mission, and nicknamed "Xiaofei" (“little flyer”) on Chinese social networks.) Its mission goal was to land safely at a determined location after an 8-day mission involving orbits around the Moon before having the craft return to Earth at a speed of 11.2 kilometers per second. The probe passed the Monn at around 11,300 km on 27 October and returned to Earth on 30 October. Its return to Earth involved entering, skipping the upper atmosphere and re-entering Earth's atmosphere to land in Inner Mongolia. The descent capsule separated from the main vehicle at 21h53 UT and made a skip re-entry at around 120 kilometers altitude. The process helped the spacecraft slow down and avoid being burnt up by intense heat generated by air resistance. It finally landed north of Hohhot, about 500 kilometers from Beijing, at 22h42 UT. The probe traversed 840,000 kilometers in its mission and reportedly “take some incredible pictures of Earth and Moon together.” (The service module made a burn at 21h56 UT to avoid reentry Earth atmosphere and swung past the Earth to head out towards the Lagrande-2 point.)  This flight in the first mission to the Moon and back since 1976 and China become the third nation to do so, after the former Soviet Union and the United States.
      Meanwhile, the service module continued orbiting the Earht-Moon system. On 26 November 2014, it had reached the Earth-Moon second Lagrange Point (L2). "To take maximum advantage of the capacity of the service module to test relevant technologies for Chang'e 5, we are conducting a series of experiments on the service module, including circling the Lagrangian Point L2 and carrying equipment for experiments in orbit," said Pei Zhaoyu, deputy director of the China National Space Administration. The module carries equipment including GPS, a high-resolution camera and a star sensor.  In flight for 28 days, it was 421,000 kilometers from Earth and 63,000 km from the moon. Chinese media report that “All experiments are going well. ”  The service module is in an elliptical orbit with an apogee of 540,000 km and a perigee of 600 km.
     The service module is scheduled to leave L2 at the beginning of January 2015 and head to the Moon. It will enter the Moon's orbit in mid-January. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 704, 705 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Xinhua's Stories ; China Daily's 12 Aug 14, ..., 3 Dec 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-065A ; Gunter's Chang'e 5-T1  ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Chang'e 5 Orbital Module 
Spacecraft: The spacecraft is called Chang'e 5 Flight Test Device.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #204 ; 2014-65 ; 7,676th spacecraft, (N/a).
Type: Planetary probe (Lunar)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China
Launch: 23 October 2014 at 18h00 UT, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3C/G2.
Orbit: Earth-Monn trajectory (with lunars orbits).
Recovered: 31 October 2014 
Mission: This Chinese planetary probe, which has no official name, was an experimental spacecraft to test key technologies designed to be used in Chang'e 5, scheduled to return lunar sample to Earth in 2017. (The mission was unofficially called Chang'e 5 T1, Chang'e 5 Flight Test Vehicle or Reentry Return Flight Test Mission, and nicknamed "Xiaofei" (“little flyer”) on Chinese social networks.) Its mission goal was to land safely at a determined location after an 8-day mission involving orbits around the Moon before having the craft return to Earth at a speed of 11.2 kilometers per second. The probe passed the Monn at around 11,300 km on 27 October and returned to Earth on 30 October. Its return to Earth involved entering, skipping the upper atmosphere and re-entering Earth's atmosphere to land in Inner Mongolia. The descent capsule separated from the main vehicle at 21h53 UT and made a skip re-entry at around 120 kilometers altitude. The process helped the spacecraft slow down and avoid being burnt up by intense heat generated by air resistance. It finally landed north of Hohhot, about 500 kilometers from Beijing, at 22h42 UT. The probe traversed 840,000 kilometers in its mission and reportedly “take some incredible pictures of Earth and Moon together.” (The service module made a burn at 21h56 UT to avoid reentry Earth atmosphere and swung past the Earth to head out towards the Lagrande-2 point.)  This flight in the first mission to the Moon and back since 1976 and China become the third nation to do so, after the former Soviet Union and the United States.
      Meanwhile, the service module continued orbiting the Earht-Moon system. On 26 November 2014, it had reached the Earth-Moon second Lagrange Point (L2). "To take maximum advantage of the capacity of the service module to test relevant technologies for Chang'e 5, we are conducting a series of experiments on the service module, including circling the Lagrangian Point L2 and carrying equipment for experiments in orbit," said Pei Zhaoyu, deputy director of the China National Space Administration. The module carries equipment including GPS, a high-resolution camera and a star sensor.  In flight for 28 days, it was 421,000 kilometers from Earth and 63,000 km from the moon. Chinese media report that “All experiments are going well. ”  The service module is in an elliptical orbit with an apogee of 540,000 km and a perigee of 600 km.
     The service module is scheduled to leave L2 at the beginning of January 2015 and head to the Moon. It will enter the Moon's orbit in mid-January. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 704, 705 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Xinhua's Stories ; China Daily's 12 Aug 14, ..., 3 Dec 14Gunter's Chang'e 5-T1  ;
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4M / Manfred Memorial Moon Mission
Spacecraft: The mission is named the Manfred Memorial Moon Mission in memory of Manfred Fuchs, a pioneer in Europe’s commercial space sector and founde of OHB (LuxSpace’s parent company).
Chronologies: 2014 payload #205 ; 2014-65B ; 7,677th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: LuxSpace
Launch: 23 October 2014 at 18h00 UT, from Xichang Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 3C/G2.
Orbit: Earth-Moon trajectory
Mission: 4M is a 14-kg technological demonstration probe placed in a Earth-Moon trajectory to demonstrate low-cost opportunity to perform a lunar flyby. The spacecraft is roughly the size and shape of a briefcase, fitted with a battery and a solar panel, a radio and a radiation detector (to determine the radiation dose on the trajectory). It had remained attached to the launcher’s third stage for ride around the Moon and come back to Earth on an eight-day round-trip journey. There were a 90% probability with re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere but a 10% chance taht 4M might end in a complex highly eccentric Earth orbit. One of the mission goals was to show that it is possible to do planetary missions in quicker time and lower cost.  The spacecraft was built in less than six months for approximately $500,000, entirely with private funding. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 704 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Xinhua ; China Daily's 12 Aug 14, 27 Oct 14 ; Gunter's 4M ;
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SJ-11-08 / Shijian-11-08
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #206 ; 2014-66A ; 7,678th spacecraft, 40,286th space object.
Type: Missile Early Warning
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Chinese People Liberation Army
Launch: 27 October 2014 at 6h59 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2C.
Orbit: 688 km x 703 km 
Mission: According to Chinese media, Shijian-11-08 was an “experimental satellite,” reaveling no other details about the mission’s purpose. “The satellite, which was developed by China Spacesat Co. Ltd under the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation, will be used to conduct scientific experiments in space.”  The spacecraft is the eighth member of the Shijian 11 satellite series to go into space since 2009, and the third launched this year. Some analysts believe the Shijian 11 satellites might be part of an early warning constellation to demonstrate missile detection for the Chinese military. This marks the third Chinese space launch in a week.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No.704 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Xinhua's 27 Oct 14, 27 Oct 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-066A ; Gunter's SJ-11 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Cygnus CRS-3 (PCM-3)
Spacecraft: Also named SS Deke Slayton after the Mercury astronaut
Chronologies: 2014 payload #207 ; 2014 loss ; 7,679th spacecraft.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Orbital Science for NASA
Launch: 28 October 2014 at 22h22 UT, from Wallops Flight Facility's Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport's Launch Pad 0A, by an Antares 130.
Orbit: N/a
Mission: Cygnus CRS-3 is a cargo transport spacecraft to the International Space Station. It carried 2,215 kg of cargo, which includes some 725 kg of scientific equipment, 615 kg of food, 635 kg of support equipment, 65 kg of spacewalk gear and 37 kg of computer components. Science materials carried include a high-resolution camera to detect meteors from the space station - the first ever detailed space-based observations of meteors from space -, a study to measure blood flow from the brain to the heart in astronauts and an array of students experiments from grade school to university. It also carried a suite of 29 micro-satellite, 26 Flock Earth-remote sensing satellites and 3 technological microsatellites, to be deployed from the space station. The rest of the supplies consisted of spare parts, tools, food, clothes and other essential gear. (See SpaceflightNow stories.)  It is the third Orbital Sciences Corp’s commercial cargo flight under a $1.9 billion contract with NASA.
     Unfortunately, the Antares 130 vehicle exploded 14 seconds after lift-off at an altitude of about 100 metres.  It fell back near the launch pad, resulting in a large explosion. All of the payloads were destroyed.
     On 5 November 2014, Orbital Sciences Corp announced that: “preliminary evidence and analysis conducted to date points to a probable turbopump-related failure in one of the two Aerojet Rocketdyne AJ26 stage one main engines [a modified version of Russian NK33]. As a result, the use of these engines for the Antares vehicle likely will be discontinued.”  The day aster, TASS reports that: “Russia specialists insist that the US company which has implemented modifications to the AJ26 engines and its customers should bear all the responsibility for the accident.”
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 704 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; OSC's 5 Nov 14 ; TASS's 29 OCt 14, 29 Oct 14, 29 Oct 14, 29 Oct 14, 29 Oct 14,31 Oct 14, 6 Nov 14 ; Gunter's Cygnus-PCM ;
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Flock 1d-1 to 28
Spacecraft: RACE stands for Radiometer Atmospheric cubesat Experiment.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #208 to 233 ; 2014 loss ; 7,680th to 7705 to th spacecraft.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planet Labs
Launch: 28 October 2014 at 22h22 UT, from Wallops Flight Facility's Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport's Launch Pad 0A, by an Antares 130.
Orbit: N/a
Mission: Fourth series of 26 5-kg Earth remote sensing satellites.  Each craft is about the size of a loaf of bread. The first phase of the Flock constellation comprised five series of 28 satellites - the largest fleet ever launched -, but these 28 satellites were lost in the Antares accident.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 704 ; Spaceflight Now's ; Gunter's Flock-1a to e ;
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RACE
Spacecraft: RACE stands for Radiometer Atmospheric cubesat Experiment.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #234 ; 2014 loss ; 7,706th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: University of Texas at Austin and JPL
Launch: 28 October 2014 at 22h22 UT, from Wallops Flight Facility's Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport's Launch Pad 0A, by an Antares 130.
Orbit: N/a
Mission: RACE was a 5-kg technology satellite to perform validation of a radiometer to measure water vapor emission from Earth’s atmosphere. The University of Texas at Austin build the spacecraft in collaborating with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. (The mission was formerly known as CHARM, for cubesat Hydrometric Atmospheric Radiometer Mission.)  The satellite was to have been deployed from the International Space Station but was lost in the Antares accident.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 704 ; Spaceflight Now's ; Gunter's RACE ;
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Arkyd 3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #235 ; 2014 loss ; 7,707th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Planetary Resources
Launch: 28 October 2014 at 22h22 UT, from Wallops Flight Facility's Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport's Launch Pad 0A, by an Antares 130.
Orbit: N/a
Mission: Arkyd 3 was a 4-kg technology demonstration satellite to test systems for the planned Arkyd-100 asteroid prospecting astronomy satellites. It was to be deployed from the International Space Station but was lost in the Antares accident.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 704 ; Spaceflight Now's ; Gunter's Arkyd-3 ;
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GOMX 2
Spacecraft: RACE stands for Radiometer Atmospheric cubesat Experiment.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #236 ; 2014 loss ; 7,708th spacecraft.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: GOMSpace (Denmark)
Launch: 28 October 2014 at 22h20 UT, from Wallops Flight Facility's Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport's Launch Pad 0A, by anAntares 130.
Orbit: N/a
Mission: GOMX 2 is 2-kg technology satellite to test a de-orbit system designed by Aalborg University, an optical communications experiment from the National University of Singapore, and a new high-speed UHF transceiver from Aalborg University team. it was scheduled to be deployed from the International Space Station but was lost in the Antares accident. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 704 ; Spaceflight Now's ; Gunter's GOMX 2 ;
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Progress-M 25M / ISS-57P
Spacecraft: Progress 7K-TGM No. 424
Chronologies: 2014 payload #237 ; 2014-67A ; 7,709th spacecraft, 40,292nd space object.
Type: Cargo delivery to the International Space Station
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 29 October 2014 at 7h10 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-1, by a Soyuz-2.1a.
Orbit: Docked to the International Space STation.
Mission: Progress M-25M is a 7,250-kg cargo spacecraft carries 2,630 kg of food, fuel and supplies to the International Space Station.  Cargoes include 880 kg of fuel, 1,280 kg of dry cargo, 420 kg of fresh water and 50 kg of oxygen to revitalize the station’s atmosphere. Dry cargo includes food, hygiene and sanitary napkins, clothes, medical equipment, cameras, and science experiments, plus sets of tools, cables and electronics for space station maintenance. The cargoship docked to the Pirs module at 13.09 UT, 6 hours after launch.
It was the first time Russia sent up supplies to the space station with a Soyuz 2-1a launcher, the modernized version of the venerable launcher. The Soyuz 2-1a launcher uses updated electronics, a digital flight control system, and can loft 300 more kilograms to the International Space Station’s orbit.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 704 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; TASS' 29 oct 14, 29 Oct 14, 29 Oct 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-067A ; Gunter's Progress-M1M to 28M ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
Navstar 68 (USA 258)
Spacecraft: Navstar SVN-68 / GPS 2F-8 / 'Spica'
Chronologies: 2014 payload #238 ; 2014-68A ; 7,710th spacecraft, 40,294th space object.
Type: Navigation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. Department of Defense
Launch: 29 Octobre 2014 at 17h21 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's SLC-41, by an Atlas V 401.
Orbit: 20,456 km x 20,464 km x 55.0°
Mission: Navstar 68 is a 1,630-kg navigation satellite, part of the Global Positioning System (GPS).  It joins the GPS network as the 31st functioning spacecraft, and 8 backups. It is the eighth of 12 Boeing-built Block 2F spacecraft, the full dozen satellites are due to be launched by January 2016. The $245 million GPS 2F-8 took Plane E, Slot 1 of the fleet, replacing Navstar 43 launched in May 2000 that was moved into a backup role.
This launch marked the 50th launch of an Atlas 5 rocket and the 17th consecutive Atlas to have been launched on the first attempt.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 704 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-068A ; Gunter's GPS-2F  ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Meridian 7
Spacecraft: Meridian No. 17L
Chronologies: 2014 payload #239 ; 2014-69A ; 7,711th spacecraft, 40,296th space object.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russia Defense Ministry
Launch: 30 September 2014 at 1h43 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/4, by a Soyuz-2.1a/Fregat.
Orbit: 968 km x 39,750 km x 62.8°. 
Mission: Meridan 7 is a 2-ton communication satellite. According to Russian source, it is a dual-use (military and civilian) comsat to “ensure communication with sea vessels and ice patrol aircraft along the Northern Sea Route.” Its highly excentric orbit provides coverage to Russian polar regions with limited access to conventional communications satellites over the equator. This seventh Meridan reportedly ends the series; which will be replaced by a new series in 2016,
     The Meridian satellites are placed into highly eccentric Molniya-type orbit and are replacing the Molniya series and possibly also the Parus. They also work in conjunction with the geostationary Raduga-1M (Globus-M) satellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 704 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories; TASS' 30 Oct 14, 30 Oct 14 ; RSNF' 30 Oct 14NSSDC's 2014-069A ; Gunter's Meridan ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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ASNARO 1 / SASKE
Spacecraft: ASNARO stands for Advanced Satellite with New system Architecture for Observation
Chronologies: 2014 payload #240 ; 2014-70A ; 7,712nd spacecraft, 40,298th space object.
Type: Technology (Earth observation)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Japan Space Systems
Launch: 6 November 2014 at 7h35 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 505 km x 506 km x 97.5°
Mission: ASNARO 1 is a 495-kg technology satellite to test next generation of small satellite bus system based on open architecture technologies and manufacturing methodologies. The spacecraft has also an Earth observation mission with high performance optical sensor whose resolution is expected to be less than 1 metres.  The goal of the ASNARO Project is to drastically reduce cost and development period for spacecraft with adoption of up-to-date electronics technologies. The satellite bus system is composed of building block of subsystem. Made by NEC Corp., the trailblazing spacecraft is the first in a planned series of small Earth-viewing satellites Japanese officials intend to build for domestic and international customers.  The satellite was developed by NEC and is managed by Japan Space Systems (formerly USEF, part of the Ministry of Trade and Industry.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 705 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 13 Aug 14, 6 nov 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-070A ; Gunter's ASNARO 1 (SASKE) ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Hodoyoshi 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #241 ; 2014-70B ; 7,713rd spacecraft, 40,299th space object.
Type: Earth observation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: University of Tokyo and NESTRA (Japan)
Launch: 6 November 2014 at 7h35 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 506 km x 524 km x 97.5°
Mission: Hodoyoshi 1 is a ~50-kg experimental earth observation satellite with a 6.8-metre ground resolution.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 705 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 13 Aug 14, 6 nov 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-070B ; Gunter's Hodoyoshi 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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ChubuSat 1 / Kinshachi 1
Spacecraft: Kinschachi refers to the golden sea-monster statues on Nagoya castle.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #242 ; 2014-70C ; 7,714th spacecraft, 40,300th space object.
Type: Earth/Space Sciences
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Nagoya University and Daido University (Japan)
Launch: 6 November 2014 at 7h35 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 506 km x 537 km x 97.5°
Mission: ChubuSat 1 is a ~50-kg satellite to observe space debris.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 705 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 13 Aug 14, 6 nov 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-070C ; Gunter's ChubuSat 1 (Kinshachi 1) ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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QSAT-EOS
Spacecraft: QSAT-EOS stands for Kyushu Satellite for Earth Observation System Demonstration
Chronologies: 2014 payload #244 ; 2014-70D ; 7,716th spacecraft, 40,301st space object.
Type: Technology (Earth observation)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Kyushu University (Japan)
Launch: 6 November 2014 at 7h35 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit: 505 km x 568 km x 97.5°
Mission: QSAT-EOS is a 49-kg earth-observing satellite.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 705 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 13 Aug 14, 6 nov 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-070D ; Gunter's QSAT-EOS (Tsukushi) ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Tsubame
Spacecraft: Tsubame means 'swallow' in Japanese language.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #243 ; 2014-70E ; 7,715th spacecraft, 40,302nd space object.
Type: Astronomy (Technology)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo University of Science and JAXA
Launch: 6 November 2014 at 7h35 UT, from Yasny missile base's LC-370/13, by a Dnepr.
Orbit:  506 km x 553 km x 97.5°
Mission: Tsubame is a 49-kg satellite to measure polarization of hard X-ray photons from gamma-ray burst. It also demonstrates new technologies, notably of a newly developed Micro Control Moment Gyroscopes. The spacecraft also observe Earth with a small high-resolution optical camera.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 705 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; ITAR-TASS' 13 Aug 14, 6 nov 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-070E ; Gunter's Tsubame ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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YW-23 / Yaogan 23
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #245 ; 2014-71A ; 7,717th spacecraft, 40,305th space object.
Type: Surveillance (radar)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China People Liberation Army
Launch: 14 November 2014 at 18h53 UT, from Jiuquan Taiyuan Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2C.
Orbit: Circulat at some 500 km x 97.3°
Mission: According to Chinese media, Yaogan-23 is an Earth remote sensing satellite that “will mainly be used for scientific experiments, natural resource surveys, crop yield estimates and disaster relief.” Western analysts believe this satellite conducts all-weather global radar surveillance for the Chinese military.  The satellite may carry a synthetic aperture radar instrument that can see objects on the ground through cloud cover and in darkness. (China did not announce the launch in advance, keeping with the country’s usual policy of not disclosing the launch schedule for military satellites.)
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Xinhua's 15 Nov 14, 15 Nov 14 ; China Daily's 15 Nov 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-071A ; Gunter's Yaogan / JB-7 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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YW-24 / Yaogan 24
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #246 ; 2014-72A ; 7,718th spacecraft, 40,310th space object.
Type: Surveillance (Photo)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China People Liberation Army
Launch: 20 November 2014 at 7h12 UT, from Jiuquan Taiyuan Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 2D.
Orbit: Circulat at some 600 km x 97.9°
Mission: According to Chinese media, “Yaogan-24 remote sensing satellite  will mainly be used for scientific experiments, natural resource surveys, crop yield estimates and disaster relief.” But, according to Western analysts, it could carry an optical camera to supply global reconnaissance imagery to Chinese military authorities.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Xinhua's 20 Nov 14,  ; China Daily's 15 Nov 14 ; China Daily's 20 Nov 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-072A ; Gunter's Yaogan / JB-6 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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KZ-2 / Kuaizhou II
Spacecraft: Kuaizhou means “speedy vessel” in Chinese.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #247 ; 2014-73A ; 7,719th spacecraft, 40,311th space object.
Type: Technology? (Earth Observation)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China People Liberation Army
Launch: 21 November 2014 at 6h37 UT,  from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a  Kuaizhou.
Orbit:
Mission: According to Chinese media; “Kuaizhou II, or speedy vessel II, will be used to monitor natural disasters and provide disaster-relief information.” This launch marks the second launch of the Kuaizhou rocket, after its inaugural launch in September 2013. (Cninese news agencies did not release any photos of the liftoff, a departure from standard procedure.) Western experts believe the Kuaizhou rocket — derived from China’s strategic missile program — can be launched from a wheeled mobile transporter within days of call-upm and from many locations.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Xinhua's 21 Nov 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-073A ; Gunter's Kuaizhou 1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Soyuz TMA-15M / ISS-41S
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #248 ; 2014-74A ; 7,720th spacecraft, 40,312th space object.
Type: Piloted spaceship
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Roscosmos Russian Space Agency
Launch: 23 November 2014 at 21h01 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's , by a Soyuz-FG.
Orbit: Docked to the International Space Station.
Mission: Soyuz TMA-15M is a crew transport spaceship which carriied ISS Expedition 49/43 crew to the International Space Station (Anton Shkaplerov, Samantha Cristoforetti and Terry Virts). The spacecraft docked with the Poisk module on  UT.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories, ISS Expedition 41, ISS Expedition 42 ; ITAT-TASS' 5 Sep 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-074A ; Gunter's Soyuz-TMA ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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SpinSat 1
Spacecraft: Spinsat stands for Special Purpose Inexpensive Satellite
Chronologies: 2014 payload #249 ; 2014-67FL ; 7,721st spacecraft, 40,314th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Naval Research Laboratory
Launch: Launched onboard Dragon CRS-4 on 21 September 2014 at 5h52 UT and deployed from ISS on 28 November 2014 at 17h00?
Orbit: SpinSat-1 is a 57-kg technological satellite to test new electrically-controlled micro-thrusters, to refine the military’s ability to track objects in space and to acquire data on the density of the tenuous upper layers of Earth’s atmosphere. Developed by the Naval Research Laboratory, the craft is a 56-cm spherical spacecraft, the size of a beach ball, equipped with 72 tiny solid-fueled rocket thrusters. Engineers hope to test the rocket jets and adjust their thrust levels by fluctuating the electrical current reaching the thrusters. Officials plan to track SpinSat’s orbit and spin rate using lasers since the satellite is covered in reflectors to bounce laser light beams back to receivers on the ground, helping engineers determine which way the spacecraft is pointing.
     Also, SpinSat’s deployment from the International Space Station was the first time a satellite was released from a new mechanism designed to accommodate spacecraft weighing up to 100 kilograms: the Space Station Integrated Kinetic Launcher for Orbital Payload Systems (SSIKLOPS), nicknamed Cyclops. (The station already has a deployer for tiny cubesat satellites, which weigh less than 5 kg.)  SpinSat deployment provided a “proof of concept” exercise to demonstrate how the Cyclops system works.
     Engineers say a satellite released from the Space Station’s altitude (of 400 km] is likely to re-enter the atmosphere and burn up within several months to a couple of years, unless it carries rocket thrusters to maintain its orbit.
Mission: SpinSat is a technology satellite test how a small satellite moves and positions itself in space using new thruster technology
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Gunter's Spinsat ; CelesTrak's Search=1998-067 ;
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GLONASS-K1 #2
Spacecraft: GLONASS stands for Global Navigation Satellite System 
Glonass-K1 No. 12L / Glonsss 702.
(The satellite also could be designated Kosmos 2501.)
Chronologies: 2014 payload #250 ; 2014-75A ; 7,722nd spacecraft, 40,315th space object.
Type: Navitation
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Russian Defense Ministry
Launch: 30 November 2014 at 21h52 UT, from Plesetsk Cosmodrome's LC-43/4, by a Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat.
Orbit:
Mission: This GLONASS K Is a 900-kg navigation satellite, the second craft in a series of upgraded craft designed to last longer, transmit more navigation signals and launch on smaller rockets.  It demonstrate new technologies that Russia plans to incorporate in the future operational GLONASS navigation system. The first GLONASS K was launched in February 2011. This is the fifth GLONASS launched from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome, all other GLONASS launches had been made from Baykonur Cosmodrome by Proton-M carrier rockets. GLONASS K satellites is expected to operate for 10 years — an improvement from the seven-year design life of previous satellites — and features five navigation channels, including a new civilian L-band signal. The GLONASS-K are lighter, generate more electrical power, and are based on an unpressurized Express 1000K bus built by ISS Reshetnev. The GLONASS navigation constellation currently in orbit includes 24 operational satellites and two spares, enough to provide global coverage for users on land, at sea, or in the air.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's ; TASS' 24 Nov 14 ; TASS' 1 Dec 14 ; RSNF's 1 Dec 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-075A ; Gunter's Uragan-K1 (GLONASS-K1) ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Hayabusa2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #251 ; 2014-76A ; 7,723rd spacecraft, 40,319th space object.
Type: Planetary Probe
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit.
Mission: Hayabusa2 is a 590-kg planetary probe with an audacious six-year roundtrip journey to a 1-km asteroid, dropping a fleet of landers on i, and collecting rock samples to return it to Earth for analysis. It is a follow-on to the similar MUSES-C / Hayabusa mission to return to Earth samples of surface from an asteroid. 
     Hayabusa2 planned to intercept asteroid 1999 JU3 in June 2018, a planetoid rich in carbon (the fundamental building block of all organic life) and that has a very dark surface (reflecting less light than charcoal). The space probe will try to retrieve three samples from the asteroid, two from its surface and one from inside the asteroid.  Target asteroids are different: asteroid Itokawa explored by Hayabusa is rock-rich S-type one, as Hayabusa2 target is a C-type asteroid which is thought to contain much more organic matters. Hayabusa is designed to return to Earth with at least one gram of material, including samples from beneath the surface of hte asteroid. (In a best case scenario, scientists say the Japanese asteroid probe could bring back up to several grams of specimens.)
     Before it reaches 1999 JU3, Hayabusa2 will swing by Earth in December 2015 for a gravity assist. Once it arrives at its target it will spend about 18 months in the vicinity of the asteroid to map it, identify landing sites and collect samples from the  surface and interior. The mission is due to depart in December 2019. Its landing capsule will return to Earth and parachute to a touchdown in Australia in December 2020.
     Valued at nearly $300 million, Hayabusa2 is almost the same as Hayabusa, but it is a better version of the probe which overcame a series of crippling malfunctions to touch down on an asteroid in 2005 and make it back to Earth with microscopic specimens. Hayabusa2 carries backup systems engineers say will reduce the craft’s vulnerability to the problems that plagued its predecessor. 
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; JAXA's Hayabusa 2 ; Spaceflight Now's ; NSSDC's 2014-076A ; Gunter's Hayabusa 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Shin'en 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #252 ; 2014-76B ; 7,724th spacecraft, 40,320th space object.
Type: Amateur/students
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor:  Kagoshima University, Japan
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit.
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's ; NSSDC's 2014-079B ; Gunter's Shin'en 2 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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DESPATCH
Spacecraft: DESPATCH stads for Deep Space Amateur Troubadour’s Challenge.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #253 ; 2014-76C ; 7,725th spacecraft, 40,321st space object.
Type: Amateur/students
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Tama Art University, Japan
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit.
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's ; NSSDC's 2014-076C ; Gunter's DESPATCH (ARTSAT 2) ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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PROCYON
Spacecraft: PROCYON stands for Proximate Object Close flyby with Optical Navigation
Chronologies: 2014 payload #254 ; 2014-76D ; 7,726th spacecraft, 40,322nd space object.
Type: Planetary Probe
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit.
Mission:
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's ; JAXA Flight StatussNSSDC's 2014-076D ; Gunter's PROCYON ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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MASCOT
Spacecraft: MASCOT stands for Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout. 
Chronologies: 2014 payload #255 ; 2014-76 ; 7,727th spacecraft.
Type: Planetary lander
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: DRL and CNEW 
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit (carry on by Hayabusa2).
Mission: MASCOT is a 10-kg lander, about the size of a shoebox, which will land on asteroid 1999 JU3 in 2018. Scientists expect it will record imagery of the landscape and gather science data on the tiny world. MASCOT carries a wide-field camera, a magnetometer and a radiometer to measure the asteroid’s temperature and thermal characteristics. A microscope will help determine what minerals make up the asteroid’s surface. The lander also features a device to help it to hop across the asteroid and gather data from at least two sites. MASCOT’s mission will last about 16 hours before it loses power.  The craft was developed by the European scientists that designed the Philae lander that explore comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November 2014. The team is led by DLR Institute of Space Systems in Bremen, Germany, with payload, power and communications contributions from CNES, the French space agency.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's 2014 Stories ; Gunter'sHayabusa 2 ;
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Minerva II-1a
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #256 ; 2014-75 ; 7,728th spacecraft.
Type: Planetary lander
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit (carry on by Hayabusa2).
Mission: Minerva II-1a, II-1b and II-2 are three 1-kg lander/hopper devices which will be ejected onto the asteroid 1999 JU3 surface.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's 2014 Stories ; Gunter'sHayabusa 2 ;
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Minerva II-1b
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #257 ; 2014-75 ; 7,729th spacecraft.
Type: Planetary lander
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit (carry on by Hayabusa2).
Mission: Minerva II-1a, II-1b and II-2 are three 1-kg lander/hopper devices which will be ejected onto the asteroid 1999 JU3 surface.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's 2014 Stories ; Gunter'sHayabusa 2 ;
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Minerva II-2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #258 ; 2014-75 ; 7,730th spacecraft.
Type: Planetary lander
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit (carry on by Hayabusa2).
Mission: Minerva II-1a, II-1b and II-2 are three 1-kg lander/hopper devices which will be ejected onto the asteroid 1999 JU3 surface.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's 2014 Stories ; Gunter'sHayabusa 2 ;
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SCI
Spacecraft: SCI stands for Small Carry-on Impactor.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #259 ; 2014-75 ; 7,731sst spacecraft.
Type: Planetary lander
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit (carry on by Hayabusa2).
Mission: SCI is a small, drop-off explosive penetrator that will hit asteroid 1999 JU3 with a velocity of 2 km/s. The crater formed by the impact will allow further observations by the onboard instruments and  by the DCAM-3 camera subsatellite.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's 2014 Stories ; Gunter'sHayabusa 2 ;
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DCAM-3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #260 ; 2014-75 ; 7,732nd spacecraft.
Type: Planetary lander
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit (carry on by Hayabusa2).
Mission: To observe the explosion produced by SCI, the DCAM-3 deployable camera subsatellite will deployed by Hayabusa2. It is similar to the DCAM subsatellites.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's 2014 Stories ; Gunter'sHayabusa 2 ;
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Target Marker 1
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #261 ; 2014-75 ; 7,733rd spacecraft.
Type: Planetary lander
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit (carry on by Hayabusa2).
Mission: Five small, beanbag-like 'Target Markers' will be ejected onto asteroid 1999 JU3’s surface to help guide Hayabusa2 in its landing and sample mission.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's 2014 Stories ; Gunter'sHayabusa 2 ;
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Target Marker 2
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #262 ; 2014-75 ; 7,734th spacecraft.
Type: Planetary lander
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit (carry on by Hayabusa2).
Mission: Five small, beanbag-like 'Target Markers' will be ejected onto asteroid 1999 JU3’s surface to help guide Hayabusa2 in its landing and sample mission.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's 2014 Stories ; Gunter'sHayabusa 2 ;
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Target Marker 3
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #263 ; 2014-75 ; 7,735th spacecraft.
Type: Planetary lander
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit (carry on by Hayabusa2).
Mission: Five small, beanbag-like 'Target Markers' will be ejected onto asteroid 1999 JU3’s surface to help guide Hayabusa2 in its landing and sample mission.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's 2014 Stories ; Gunter'sHayabusa 2 ;
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Target Marker 4
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #264 ; 2014-75 ; 7,736th spacecraft.
Type: Planetary lander
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit (carry on by Hayabusa2).
Mission: Five small, beanbag-like 'Target Markers' will be ejected onto asteroid 1999 JU3’s surface to help guide Hayabusa2 in its landing and sample mission.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's 2014 Stories ; Gunter'sHayabusa 2 ;
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Target Marker 5
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #265 ; 2014-75 ; 7,737th spacecraft.
Type: Planetary lander
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: JAXA
Launch: 3 December 2014 at 4h22 UT, from Tanegashima Space Center's VLP-1, by a H-IIA 202.
Orbit: Heliocentric orbit (carry on by Hayabusa2).
Mission: Five small, beanbag-like 'Target Markers' will be ejected onto asteroid 1999 JU3’s surface to help guide Hayabusa2 in its landing and sample mission.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's 2014 Stories ; Gunter'sHayabusa 2 ;
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Orion EFT-1
Spacecraft: EFT-1 stands for Exploration Flight Test-1
Chronologies: 2014 payload #266 ; 2014-77A ; 7,738th spacecraft, 40,329th space object.
Type: Technology
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: NASA
Launch: 5 December 2014 at 12h05 UT, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's LC-37, by a Delta IV-Heavy.
Orbit: Maximum altitude: 5,809 km x 28.8° 
Mission: The Orion spacecraft is NASA's next-generation crew vehicle designed to carry astronauts on expeditions beyond low Earth orbit aboard the Space Launch System. On this two-orbit, four-hour test flight, an Orion capsule will reachee up to 5,800 km above Earth and will re-enter the atmosphere at 32,000 km/h, faster than any crewed spacecraft since the Apollo moon missions. The mission will verify the design of the capsule's heat shield, avionics, parachutes and other systems before a full-up Orion spacecraft with a life support system, cockpit displays and crew accommodations launches at the end of 2017 on a more ambitious unmanned test flight to the vicinity of the moon.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 706 ; Spaceflight Now's 2013 Stories, 2014 Stories ; NASA News Releases ; NSSDC's 2014-077A ; Gunter's Orion EFT-1 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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DirecTV 14
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #267 ; 2014-78A ; 7,739th spacecraft, 40,333rd space object.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: DirecTV
Launch: 6 December 2014 at 20h40 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostarionary at 99° West longitude.
Mission: DirecTV 14 is a 6,300-kg communications satellite equipped with 16 Ka-band transponders to deliver Ultra HD and other new consumer services to DIRECTV customers across the United States (including Hawaii and Alaska) and Puerto Rico. It also carries 18 transponders in the so-called “reverse band”, which is normally used to transmit signals from Earth to space. Regulators have freed the reverse band for use in downlink communications, opening up opportunities to use the untapped spectrum commercially.  According to DirecTV, “When the satellite begins operations in early second quarter of next year, it will be the first commercial satellite to use the Reverse Band Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS) spectrum, providing additional capacity for the delivery of more 4K Ultra HD programming and other advanced services to DIRECTV customers.” For subscribers equipped with Ultra HD televisions, broadcasts from DirecTV 14 will come with four times as many pixels as a 1080p high-definition signal. “DirecTV 14 is the first full reverse band 17 gigahertz downlink satellite on Earth that is capable of high-power direct-to-home broadcast via the new reverse band spectrum.” Designed and built by Space Systems/Loral, DirecTV 14 is based on the SSL 1300 spacecraft platform with an expected lifespan of 15 years or more.  “It takes more than a million man hours of dedication and hard work to build a complex satellite such as DIRECTV 14,” said John Celli, president of Space Systems/Loral.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 707 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Arianespace's 6 Dec 14 ; DirecTV's 6 Dec 14 ; SSL's 8 Dec 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-078B ; Gunter's DirecTV 14 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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GSat 16
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #268 ; 2014-78B ; 7,740th spacecraft, 40,332nd space object.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ISRO / Indian Space Research Organisation 
Launch: 6 December 2014 at 20h40 UT, from Kourou Space Center's ELA-3, by an Ariane 5 ECA.
Orbit: Geostationary at 55° East longitude.
Mission: GSAT 16 is a 3,180-kg communications satellite which carries 12 Ku-band and 36 C-band transponders to further augment communication services across India. The satellite, which has more capacity than any communications ever built in India, will reduce India’s reliance on leased transponders aboard foreign telecom spacecraft. Built by the Indian Space Research Organization, GSAT 16 has an expected life of 12 years. According to Indian media, it cost about $140 million, including spacecraft, launch and insurance costs.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 707 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Arianespace's 6 Dec 14 ; ISRO's 7 Dec 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-078A ; Gunter's GSat 16 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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ZY-1 04 / Ziyuan-1 04 / CBERS 4
Spacecraft: CBERS stands for Chinese-Brazilian Earth Resource Satellite.
Chronologies: 2014 payload #269 ; 2014-79A ; 7,741st spacecraft, 40,336th space object.
Type: Earth Remote Sensing
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China-Brazil
Launch: 7 December 2014 2014 at 3h26 UT,  from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zneng 4B.
Orbit: 742 km x 751 km x 98.5°
Mission: CBERS 4 is a 2.3-ton Earth remote-sensing satellite which carries four cameras to take pictures of Earth in visible and infrared wavelengths.  Its sensors included thermal and infrared imagers capable of distinguishing different types of vegetation and locations where water is stored and consumed. The cameras collects black-and-white imagery with a top resolution of about 5 meters. The satellite is jointly developed, China and Brazil each led development of two cameras, and China was responsible for the $250 million spacecraft bus. It is the fifth in the Chinese-Brazilian Earth Resource Satellite program which began in 1988. None of the previous CBERS satellites are still operational. CBERS are used in planning and land management, forestry, water conservation, environmental protection and agriculture. Brazil and China will share the satellite images with African and Latin American countries. CBERS 4 has an expected life of a least three years and CBERS-5 is expected to be launched in 2017.
Notes: Chinese media report that “it was the 200th launch of the Long March [Chang Zheng] rocket family since April 24, 1970, when a Long March-1 successfully carried China's first satellite, Dongfanghong-1, into space.” They thus forget the first launch of a Chang Zheng, which failed on 1st November 1969
     “There were seven failures in the first 100 launches,” reports Xinhua News Agency. “Since then, there have been just two, a better safety record than either the United States or Russia.”  In reality, Chang Zheng rockets failed 12 times (3 times in the last 100 launches), for a success rate of 94%, which place this family of launcher at the 11th rank
     The Chang Zheng are designed and manufactured by the China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology, a CASC subsidiary. Lei Fanpei, chairman of the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC), told Xinhua that the Long March rockets will make at least another 100 launches in the next seven years.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 707 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Xinhua's 15 Mar 14, 7 Dec 14, 7 Dec 14 ; China Daily's 1 Dec 14, 7 Dec 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-079A ; Gunter's CBERS 3, 4 / ZY-1 03, 04 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Yaogan 25
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #270 ; 2014-80A ; 7,742nd spacecraft, 40,338th space object.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China's People Libaration ARmy
Launch: 11 December 2014 at 19h33 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4C.
Orbit: 1,089 km x 1,097 km x 63.4°
Mission: According to Chinese media, Yaogan 25 is an Earth remote sensing satellite. “Yaogan satellites are mainly used for scientific experiments, natural resource surveys, crop yield estimates and disaster relief,” reports Xinhua News Agency.  Yaogan is in fact a cover name for China’s military spy satellites. Yaogan 25 is a three-some military surveillance satellites that likely track global naval activity. It follows a pattern established on four previous launches: Yaogan 9 (March 2010), Yaogan 16 (November 2012), Yaogan 17 (September 2013) and Yaogan 20 (August 2014).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 707 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Xinhua's 11 Dec 14, 11 Dec 14 ; TASS's 11 Dec 14 ; NSSDC's 2014-080A ; Gunter's Yaogan 9, 16, 17, 20, 25 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Yaogan 25A / Yaogan 25 Subsatellite
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #121 ; 2014-80B ; 7,743rd spacecraft, 40,339th space object.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China's People Libaration ARmy
Launch: 11 December 2014 at 19h33 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4C.
Orbit: 1,091 km x 1,097 km x 63.4°
Mission: According to Chinese media, Yaogan 25 is an Earth remote sensing satellite. “Yaogan satellites are mainly used for scientific experiments, natural resource surveys, crop yield estimates and disaster relief,” reports Xinhua News Agency.  Yaogan is in fact a cover name for China’s military spy satellites. Yaogan 25 is a three-some military surveillance satellites that likely track global naval activity. It follows a pattern established on four previous launches: Yaogan 9 (March 2010), Yaogan 16 (November 2012), Yaogan 17 (September 2013) and Yaogan 20 (August 2014).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 707 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Xinhua's 11 Dec 14, 11 Dec 14 NSSDC's 2014-080B ; Gunter's Yaogan 9, 16, 17, 20, 25 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Yaogan 25B / Yaogan 25 Subsatellite
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #272 ; 2014-80C ; 7,744th spacecraft, 40,340th space object.
Type: Surveillance
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: China's People Libaration ARmy
Launch: 11 December 2014 at 19h33 UT, from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, by a Chang Zheng 4C.
Orbit: 1,090 km x 1,098 km x 63.4°
Mission: According to Chinese media, Yaogan 25 is an Earth remote sensing satellite. “Yaogan satellites are mainly used for scientific experiments, natural resource surveys, crop yield estimates and disaster relief,” reports Xinhua News Agency.  Yaogan is in fact a cover name for China’s military spy satellites. Yaogan 25 is a three-some military surveillance satellites that likely track global naval activity. It follows a pattern established on four previous launches: Yaogan 9 (March 2010), Yaogan 16 (November 2012), Yaogan 17 (September 2013) and Yaogan 20 (August 2014).
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 707 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; Xinhua's 11 Dec 14, 11 Dec 14 NSSDC's 2014-080C ; Gunter's Yaogan 9, 16, 17, 20, 25 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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NROL-35 (USA 259)
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #273 ; 2014-81A ; 7,745th spacecraft.
Type: Electronic Intelligence? & Missile Early Warning, 40,344th space object?
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: U.S. National Reconnaissance Office (NRO)
Launch: 13 December 2014 at 3h19 UT, from Vandenberg Air Force Station'S SLC-3, by an Atlas V 541. (541 configuration means a 5-meter nose cone, 4 solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage.)
Orbit: 2,101 km x 37,748 km x 62.9°
Mission: The mission is known simply as NROL-35, a classified satellite-delivery flight for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office. The NRO is the secretive government agency that controls the country’s spy satellites. According to Jonahant McDowell, the payload is probably a signals intelligence satellite with an attached SBIRS-HEO early warning sensoras a secondary payload. According to Gunter Dirk, this spacecraft is probably the first of the second next-generationt of the Trumpet electronic intelligence satellites, operating in a Molniya-type orbit. As no name is known, the craft is referred to as the first "Trumpet Follow On 2". The satellite most likely use a large, unfurlable dish antenna to collect the signals, and is possibly the host for the SBIRS-HEO-3 early warning sensor. But, as Ted Molczan, a respected satellite-observing hobbyist, sais: “NRO launches have the potential for surprise, especially when there is a change of rocket and/or payload,” report Spâceflight Now
Not4s:  This launch marks the 633rd launch for the Atlas program since 1957, the 51st launch of an Atlas 5 since 2002, the 17th 500-series flight of the Atlas 5, and the 3rd Atlas 5  in the 541 configuration.  It also marks the 222nd mission for the Centaur upper stage and the 91st United Launch Alliance launch.
     This was the most powerful Atlas vehicle ever launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base; the 541 configuration of an Atlas V, with a 5-meter nose cone, 4 solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. generating 900 tons of thrust at liftoff.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 707 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-081A ; Gunter's 'Trumpet F/O-2' ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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Yamal 401
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #274 ; 2014-82A ; 7,746th spacecraft.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: Gazprom Space Systems, Russia
Launch: 15 December 2014 at 0h16 UT, from Baykonur Cosmodrome's LC-81/24, by a Proton-M/Briz-M.
Orbit: Geostationary at 90° East longitude.
Mission: Yamal 401 is a 2,976-kg communications satellite with 53 transponders and six antennas in C and Ku bands, for services in Europe and Asia. Built by ISS-Reshetnev Company, it is the third craft based on the heavy-class Express-2000 platform and it has an expected lifespan of 15 years. Thales Alenia Space of France and Italy provided the Yamal 401 satellite’s communications systems.
Notes: This mission marks the 400th launch of a Proton booster,  since its first launch in July 1965.  The laucher has succeeded 363 times, for a succss rate of 90.75%.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 707 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; TASS' 26 Nov 14, 2 Dec 14, 8 Dec 14, 15 Dec 14, 15 Dec 14 ; NSSDC's  ; Gunter's Yamal 401 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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CARE
Spacecraft: CARE stands for Crew Module Atmospheric Re-entry Experiment
Chronologies: 2014 payload n/a (sub-orbital)
Type: Technology (Launcher Test)
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: ISRO
Launch: 18 December 2014 at 4h00 UT, from Satish Dhawan Space Center's Second Pad, by a GLSV Mk.3.
Orbit: Sub-orbital
Mission: Sub-orbital test flight of India’s new launch vehicle: the LVM-3 or Geostationary Satellite Launch Vehicle Mk. 3. As the most powerull rocket ever developed by India, GSLV Mk.3 can carry up to 10 metric tons into low-Earth orbit and up to 4 metric tons into geostationary transfer orbit. For its maiden flight, the launcher did not reach orbital velocity (8 km/sec.), but a top speed of 5.3 km/sec. and a peak altitude of 126 kilometers. This launch checked the performance of the GSLV Mk. 3’s first stage and strap-on boosters, as the launcher’s cryogenic upper stage was dormant during this flight. The CARE capsule is the same size and shape of the crew module Indian engineers hope to design to carry three astronauts into orbit. Blanketed with a heat shield, il came back to Earth and deployed parachutes to splash down in the Bay of Bengal, about 1,500 kilometres southeast from the launch pad, some 21 minutes after liftoff.  Indian Coast Guard retrieved the capsule and returned it to laboratory for inspections. Started in 2002, the GSLV Mk. 3 program is projected to cost approximately $400 million by the time development is finished in two years. (This first flight cost about $24 million.)
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 707 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ;
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O3b FM9
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #275 ; 2014-83D ; 7,747th spacecraft, 40,348th space object.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: O3b Networks Ltd.
Launch: 18 December 2014 at 18h37 UT, from Kourou'Space Center's ELS, by a Soyuz-STB Fregat-MT.
Orbit: 7,835 km x 7,844 km x 0.0° x ~288 minutes.
Mission: O3b are 700-kg communications satellites carrying 12 Ka-band transponders to provide Internet services to the “other 3 billion” people living near the Equator. It was the third launch for O3b Networks, following the successful launch of the first eight satellites in June 2013 and July 2014. The O3b constellation is now fully deployed and operational. Built by Thales Alenia Space, each O3b craft has an expected lifespan of 10 years.
     The O3b constellation provides high-speed, affordable Internet access for emerging markets in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Australia and the Middle East, and thus covers nearly 180 countries which do not yet enjoy broadband Internet. The networks, which started commercial service on 1st September 2014, also provides telecom operators with trunking capacity and connectivity for mobile networks at rates and response times equal to fiber-optic networks.
Notes: The tenth Soyuz launch from the Guiana Space Center was carrying a total payload of 3,184 kg, including about 2,800 kg for the four satellites. Arianespace has now passed the mark of 500 satellites launched into orbit.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 707 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-0 ; Gunter's O3b 1 to 12 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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O3b FM10
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #276 ; 2014-83A ; 7,748th spacecraft, 40,338th space object.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: O3b Networks Ltd.
Launch: 18 December 2014 at 18h37 UT, from Kourou'Space Center's ELS, by a Soyuz-STB Fregat-MT.
Orbit: 7,832 km x 7,837 km x 0.0°  x ~288 minutes.
Mission: O3b are 700-kg communications satellites carrying 12 Ka-band transponders to provide Internet services to the “other 3 billion” people living near the Equator. It was the third launch for O3b Networks, following the successful launch of the first eight satellites in June 2013 and July 2014. The O3b constellation is now fully deployed and operational. Built by Thales Alenia Space, each O3b craft has an expected lifespan of 10 years.
     The O3b constellation provides high-speed, affordable Internet access for emerging markets in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Australia and the Middle East, and thus covers nearly 180 countries which do not yet enjoy broadband Internet. The networks, which started commercial service on 1st September 2014, also provides telecom operators with trunking capacity and connectivity for mobile networks at rates and response times equal to fiber-optic networks.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 707 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-0 ; Gunter's O3b 1 to 12 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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O3b FM11
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #277 ; 2014-83B ; 7,749th spacecraft, 40,339th space object.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: O3b Networks Ltd.
Launch: 18 December 2014 at 18h37 UT, from Kourou'Space Center's ELS, by a Soyuz-STB Fregat-MT.
Orbit: 7,816 km x 7,839 km x 0.0° x ~288 minutes.
Mission: O3b are 700-kg communications satellites carrying 12 Ka-band transponders to provide Internet services to the “other 3 billion” people living near the Equator. It was the third launch for O3b Networks, following the successful launch of the first eight satellites in June 2013 and July 2014. The O3b constellation is now fully deployed and operational. Built by Thales Alenia Space, each O3b craft has an expected lifespan of 10 years.
     The O3b constellation provides high-speed, affordable Internet access for emerging markets in Asia, Africa, Latin America, Australia and the Middle East, and thus covers nearly 180 countries which do not yet enjoy broadband Internet. The networks, which started commercial service on 1st September 2014, also provides telecom operators with trunking capacity and connectivity for mobile networks at rates and response times equal to fiber-optic networks.
Source: Jonathan Space Report No. 707 ; Spaceflight Now's Stories ; NSSDC's 2014-0 ; Gunter's O3b 1 to 12 ; CelesTrak's Search=2014 ;
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O3b FM12
Spacecraft:
Chronologies: 2014 payload #278 ; 2014-83C ; 7,750th spacecraft, 40,340th space object.
Type: Communications
Families:
Ranks:
Sponsor: O3b Networks Ltd.
Launch: 18 December 2014 at 18h37 UT, from Kourou'Space Center's ELS, by a Soyuz-STB Fregat-MT.